Limits...
Age-related effects on event-related brain potentials in a congruence/incongruence judgment color-word Stroop task.

Zurrón M, Lindín M, Galdo-Alvarez S, Díaz F - Front Aging Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: The Stroop effect occurred in both age groups, with longer reaction times in the older group than in the young group for both types of stimuli, but no difference in the number of errors made by either group.Furthermore, the P3b amplitude was maximal at frontal locations in older participants and at parietal locations in young participants.The age-related increase in perceptual resources and the posterior-to-anterior shift in older adults support adaptive reorganization of the neural networks involved in the processing of this Stroop-type task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, University of Santiago de Compostela Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We examined the event-related brain potentials elicited by color-word stimuli in a Stroop task in which healthy participants (young and old) had to judge whether the meaning and the color of the stimulus were congruent or incongruent. The Stroop effect occurred in both age groups, with longer reaction times in the older group than in the young group for both types of stimuli, but no difference in the number of errors made by either group. Although the N2 and P3b latencies were longer in the older than in the younger group, there were no differences between groups in the latencies of earlier event-related potential components, and therefore the age-related processing slowing is not generalized. The frontal P150 amplitude was larger, and the parietal P3b amplitude was smaller, in the older than in the younger group. Furthermore, the P3b amplitude was maximal at frontal locations in older participants and at parietal locations in young participants. The age-related increase in perceptual resources and the posterior-to-anterior shift in older adults support adaptive reorganization of the neural networks involved in the processing of this Stroop-type task.

No MeSH data available.


Grand average ERP waveforms, at Fz, Cz, Pz, and Oz electrode sites, elicited by congruent color words and incongruent color words in the young and old participants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4060640&req=5

Figure 1: Grand average ERP waveforms, at Fz, Cz, Pz, and Oz electrode sites, elicited by congruent color words and incongruent color words in the young and old participants.

Mentions: After visual inspection of the grand averages, we identified the frontal P150-occipital N170 complex in the 120–180 ms post-stimulus time interval (see Joyce and Rossion, 2005, for a demonstration that both waves comprise a single component). The P150 peak latency and amplitude were measured at Fz, whereas N170 parameters were measured at Oz (see Figure 1).


Age-related effects on event-related brain potentials in a congruence/incongruence judgment color-word Stroop task.

Zurrón M, Lindín M, Galdo-Alvarez S, Díaz F - Front Aging Neurosci (2014)

Grand average ERP waveforms, at Fz, Cz, Pz, and Oz electrode sites, elicited by congruent color words and incongruent color words in the young and old participants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4060640&req=5

Figure 1: Grand average ERP waveforms, at Fz, Cz, Pz, and Oz electrode sites, elicited by congruent color words and incongruent color words in the young and old participants.
Mentions: After visual inspection of the grand averages, we identified the frontal P150-occipital N170 complex in the 120–180 ms post-stimulus time interval (see Joyce and Rossion, 2005, for a demonstration that both waves comprise a single component). The P150 peak latency and amplitude were measured at Fz, whereas N170 parameters were measured at Oz (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The Stroop effect occurred in both age groups, with longer reaction times in the older group than in the young group for both types of stimuli, but no difference in the number of errors made by either group.Furthermore, the P3b amplitude was maximal at frontal locations in older participants and at parietal locations in young participants.The age-related increase in perceptual resources and the posterior-to-anterior shift in older adults support adaptive reorganization of the neural networks involved in the processing of this Stroop-type task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, University of Santiago de Compostela Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We examined the event-related brain potentials elicited by color-word stimuli in a Stroop task in which healthy participants (young and old) had to judge whether the meaning and the color of the stimulus were congruent or incongruent. The Stroop effect occurred in both age groups, with longer reaction times in the older group than in the young group for both types of stimuli, but no difference in the number of errors made by either group. Although the N2 and P3b latencies were longer in the older than in the younger group, there were no differences between groups in the latencies of earlier event-related potential components, and therefore the age-related processing slowing is not generalized. The frontal P150 amplitude was larger, and the parietal P3b amplitude was smaller, in the older than in the younger group. Furthermore, the P3b amplitude was maximal at frontal locations in older participants and at parietal locations in young participants. The age-related increase in perceptual resources and the posterior-to-anterior shift in older adults support adaptive reorganization of the neural networks involved in the processing of this Stroop-type task.

No MeSH data available.