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Thermal-work strain in law enforcement personnel during chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) training.

Yokota M, Karis AJ, Tharion WJ - Int J Occup Environ Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Thermal safety standards for the use of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) ensembles have been established for various US occupations, but not for law enforcement personnel.Physiological responses were examined using unobtrusive heart rate (HR) monitors and a simple thermoregulatory model to predict core temperature (Tc) using HR and environment.The non-invasive method of using physiological monitoring and thermoregulatory modeling could improve law enforcement mission to reduce the risk of heat illness or injury.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Thermal safety standards for the use of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) ensembles have been established for various US occupations, but not for law enforcement personnel.

Objectives: We examined thermal strain levels of 30 male US law enforcement personnel who participated in CBRN field training in Arizona, Florida, and Massachusetts.

Methods: Physiological responses were examined using unobtrusive heart rate (HR) monitors and a simple thermoregulatory model to predict core temperature (Tc) using HR and environment.

Results: Thermal strain levels varied by environments, activity levels, and type of CBRN ensemble. Arizona and Florida volunteers working in hot-dry and hot-humid environment indicated high heat strain (predicted max Tc>38·5°C). The cool environment of Massachusetts reduced thermal strain although thermal strains were occasionally moderate.

Conclusions: The non-invasive method of using physiological monitoring and thermoregulatory modeling could improve law enforcement mission to reduce the risk of heat illness or injury.

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The diagram of the initial capability decision aid (ICDA) thermoregulatory model.
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oeh-20-02-126-f01: The diagram of the initial capability decision aid (ICDA) thermoregulatory model.

Mentions: The initial capability decision aid (ICDA), has been used to predict thermal strain.13 The ICDA is a mathematical model where the human body is represented as a cylinder consisting of two compartments (core and skin) surrounded by a clothing layer. Compared to other thermoregulatory models, this model is relatively simple to use and requires only a few non-invasive input variables. Model inputs include the participant’s anthropometric values (height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]), HR, environmental conditions (air temperature [Ta], relative humidity [RH], mean radiant temperature [MRT], and wind speed [WS]), and biophysical properties of the clothing/equipment worn (total insulation [clo], water vapor permeability [im]). Highlights of the ICDA model are described here and Fig. 1 provides a schematic of the model. Detailed descriptions of this model are provided elsewhere.13,14


Thermal-work strain in law enforcement personnel during chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) training.

Yokota M, Karis AJ, Tharion WJ - Int J Occup Environ Health (2014)

The diagram of the initial capability decision aid (ICDA) thermoregulatory model.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4060587&req=5

oeh-20-02-126-f01: The diagram of the initial capability decision aid (ICDA) thermoregulatory model.
Mentions: The initial capability decision aid (ICDA), has been used to predict thermal strain.13 The ICDA is a mathematical model where the human body is represented as a cylinder consisting of two compartments (core and skin) surrounded by a clothing layer. Compared to other thermoregulatory models, this model is relatively simple to use and requires only a few non-invasive input variables. Model inputs include the participant’s anthropometric values (height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]), HR, environmental conditions (air temperature [Ta], relative humidity [RH], mean radiant temperature [MRT], and wind speed [WS]), and biophysical properties of the clothing/equipment worn (total insulation [clo], water vapor permeability [im]). Highlights of the ICDA model are described here and Fig. 1 provides a schematic of the model. Detailed descriptions of this model are provided elsewhere.13,14

Bottom Line: Thermal safety standards for the use of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) ensembles have been established for various US occupations, but not for law enforcement personnel.Physiological responses were examined using unobtrusive heart rate (HR) monitors and a simple thermoregulatory model to predict core temperature (Tc) using HR and environment.The non-invasive method of using physiological monitoring and thermoregulatory modeling could improve law enforcement mission to reduce the risk of heat illness or injury.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Thermal safety standards for the use of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) ensembles have been established for various US occupations, but not for law enforcement personnel.

Objectives: We examined thermal strain levels of 30 male US law enforcement personnel who participated in CBRN field training in Arizona, Florida, and Massachusetts.

Methods: Physiological responses were examined using unobtrusive heart rate (HR) monitors and a simple thermoregulatory model to predict core temperature (Tc) using HR and environment.

Results: Thermal strain levels varied by environments, activity levels, and type of CBRN ensemble. Arizona and Florida volunteers working in hot-dry and hot-humid environment indicated high heat strain (predicted max Tc>38·5°C). The cool environment of Massachusetts reduced thermal strain although thermal strains were occasionally moderate.

Conclusions: The non-invasive method of using physiological monitoring and thermoregulatory modeling could improve law enforcement mission to reduce the risk of heat illness or injury.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus