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Use of the SLW index to calculate growth function in the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.

Poot-Salazar A, Hernández-Flores Á, Ardisson PL - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW).Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index.Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Departamento de Recursos del Mar, Cinvestav, Carretera Antigua a Progreso km 6, 97310 Merida, Yucatan, Mexico [2] Centro Regional de Investigaciones Pesqueras de Yucalpeten, Instituto Nacional de Pesca, Blvd. del Pescador S/N, Puerto de Abrigo, 97320 Progreso, Yucatan, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Age and growth analysis is essential to fisheries management. Indirect methods to calculate growth are widely used; however, length frequency data analysis in sea cucumbers is complicated by high data variability caused by body wall elasticity. Here we calculated Isostichopus badionotus parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function. In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW). Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index. Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency. Slow or zero growth periods were observed during October and November, when weather conditions were adverse.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationships between estimated lengths and weights from sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.Points inside the dotted circle are data recorded during 2009. TW: total weight; GW: gutted weight; and Le: estimated length from the equation Le = 1.11 + 1.28 SLW, where SLW is square root of length multiplied by width.
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f2: Relationships between estimated lengths and weights from sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.Points inside the dotted circle are data recorded during 2009. TW: total weight; GW: gutted weight; and Le: estimated length from the equation Le = 1.11 + 1.28 SLW, where SLW is square root of length multiplied by width.

Mentions: The regression equation between L and SLW used to generate estimated length was: Le = 1.11 + 1.28 SLW (r2 = 0.75, p ≪ 0.001). The overall Student t-test showed that I. badionotus grows allometrically (β ≠ 3, p < 0.05), with negative allometric β values ranging from 1.5 to 2.7 (Fig. 2). However, the length-weight relationships by location showed β values near 3 (isometric value) at Progreso. In all cases, the relationship between body length and weight was significant (p < 0.001). The Le measurement explained almost 80% of variation in body weight and was a more effective predictor of weight than L (Table 1). This is because Le was derived from two measurements (square root of length multiplied by width) rather than one, which improved the accuracy of body weight estimates (Figs 2c and 2d). The equation (1) produced poor body weight estimates at lengths < 18 cm and >30 cm when using length alone (Figs. 2a and 2b). The L-GW relationships showed a point cloud (points inside the dotted circle in the Figs. 2b and 2d) that does not fit the general tendency of most observations. This point cloud corresponded to measurements recorded in 2009, 52% of which were taken in September.


Use of the SLW index to calculate growth function in the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.

Poot-Salazar A, Hernández-Flores Á, Ardisson PL - Sci Rep (2014)

Relationships between estimated lengths and weights from sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.Points inside the dotted circle are data recorded during 2009. TW: total weight; GW: gutted weight; and Le: estimated length from the equation Le = 1.11 + 1.28 SLW, where SLW is square root of length multiplied by width.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4048913&req=5

f2: Relationships between estimated lengths and weights from sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.Points inside the dotted circle are data recorded during 2009. TW: total weight; GW: gutted weight; and Le: estimated length from the equation Le = 1.11 + 1.28 SLW, where SLW is square root of length multiplied by width.
Mentions: The regression equation between L and SLW used to generate estimated length was: Le = 1.11 + 1.28 SLW (r2 = 0.75, p ≪ 0.001). The overall Student t-test showed that I. badionotus grows allometrically (β ≠ 3, p < 0.05), with negative allometric β values ranging from 1.5 to 2.7 (Fig. 2). However, the length-weight relationships by location showed β values near 3 (isometric value) at Progreso. In all cases, the relationship between body length and weight was significant (p < 0.001). The Le measurement explained almost 80% of variation in body weight and was a more effective predictor of weight than L (Table 1). This is because Le was derived from two measurements (square root of length multiplied by width) rather than one, which improved the accuracy of body weight estimates (Figs 2c and 2d). The equation (1) produced poor body weight estimates at lengths < 18 cm and >30 cm when using length alone (Figs. 2a and 2b). The L-GW relationships showed a point cloud (points inside the dotted circle in the Figs. 2b and 2d) that does not fit the general tendency of most observations. This point cloud corresponded to measurements recorded in 2009, 52% of which were taken in September.

Bottom Line: In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW).Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index.Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Departamento de Recursos del Mar, Cinvestav, Carretera Antigua a Progreso km 6, 97310 Merida, Yucatan, Mexico [2] Centro Regional de Investigaciones Pesqueras de Yucalpeten, Instituto Nacional de Pesca, Blvd. del Pescador S/N, Puerto de Abrigo, 97320 Progreso, Yucatan, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Age and growth analysis is essential to fisheries management. Indirect methods to calculate growth are widely used; however, length frequency data analysis in sea cucumbers is complicated by high data variability caused by body wall elasticity. Here we calculated Isostichopus badionotus parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function. In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW). Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index. Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency. Slow or zero growth periods were observed during October and November, when weather conditions were adverse.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus