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Use of the SLW index to calculate growth function in the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.

Poot-Salazar A, Hernández-Flores Á, Ardisson PL - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW).Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index.Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Departamento de Recursos del Mar, Cinvestav, Carretera Antigua a Progreso km 6, 97310 Merida, Yucatan, Mexico [2] Centro Regional de Investigaciones Pesqueras de Yucalpeten, Instituto Nacional de Pesca, Blvd. del Pescador S/N, Puerto de Abrigo, 97320 Progreso, Yucatan, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Age and growth analysis is essential to fisheries management. Indirect methods to calculate growth are widely used; however, length frequency data analysis in sea cucumbers is complicated by high data variability caused by body wall elasticity. Here we calculated Isostichopus badionotus parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function. In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW). Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index. Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency. Slow or zero growth periods were observed during October and November, when weather conditions were adverse.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequency distributions of measurements and a compound index for sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.A total of n = 2347 sea cucumbers I. badionotus were measured during the study period in 2009 and 2010 off the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. (a) L distribution; (b) W distribution; (c) SLW distribution; (d)TW distribution; (e) GW distribution; and (f) weight loss from TW to GW of n = 1165 sea cucumbers, loss is indicated as a percentage and shown in bold. L: dorsal body length; W: dorsal body width; SLW: square root of length multiplied by width; TW: total weight; GW: gutted weight; SD: standard deviation; and CV: coefficient of variation in percentage, lowest value is shown in bold.
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f1: Frequency distributions of measurements and a compound index for sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.A total of n = 2347 sea cucumbers I. badionotus were measured during the study period in 2009 and 2010 off the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. (a) L distribution; (b) W distribution; (c) SLW distribution; (d)TW distribution; (e) GW distribution; and (f) weight loss from TW to GW of n = 1165 sea cucumbers, loss is indicated as a percentage and shown in bold. L: dorsal body length; W: dorsal body width; SLW: square root of length multiplied by width; TW: total weight; GW: gutted weight; SD: standard deviation; and CV: coefficient of variation in percentage, lowest value is shown in bold.

Mentions: A total of 2347 sea cucumbers were measured during the study period, and five frequency distributions analyzed from the body length (L), width (W), total weight (TW), muscle wet weight or gutted weight (GW) measurements, and the compound index SLW (the square root of the length-width product) (Fig. 1). Mean body length ± SD (25.3 ± 5.2 cm; Fig. 1a) was almost twice mean body width (14.2 ± 3.1 cm; Fig. 1b), with sizes ranging from 3 to 45 cm and a population mode of 23 cm. The SLW frequency distribution showed the minimum coefficient of variance (18.6%; Fig. 1c), whereas the maximum coefficient of variance (56.9%) was observed in the GW frequency distribution (Fig. 1e). The SLW distribution was multimodal and ranged from 2.4 to 28.3 cm. Both the TW and GW frequency distributions were unimodal (mode = 600 g and 400 g, respectively). The TW frequency distribution had a mean of 552 ± 263 g with weights ranging from 1 to 1800 g (Fig. 1d). Weight loss from TW to GW was 37.5% (Fig. 1f) and, contrary to expectations, coefficient of variation (CV) was higher for GW than for TW.


Use of the SLW index to calculate growth function in the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.

Poot-Salazar A, Hernández-Flores Á, Ardisson PL - Sci Rep (2014)

Frequency distributions of measurements and a compound index for sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.A total of n = 2347 sea cucumbers I. badionotus were measured during the study period in 2009 and 2010 off the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. (a) L distribution; (b) W distribution; (c) SLW distribution; (d)TW distribution; (e) GW distribution; and (f) weight loss from TW to GW of n = 1165 sea cucumbers, loss is indicated as a percentage and shown in bold. L: dorsal body length; W: dorsal body width; SLW: square root of length multiplied by width; TW: total weight; GW: gutted weight; SD: standard deviation; and CV: coefficient of variation in percentage, lowest value is shown in bold.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4048913&req=5

f1: Frequency distributions of measurements and a compound index for sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.A total of n = 2347 sea cucumbers I. badionotus were measured during the study period in 2009 and 2010 off the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. (a) L distribution; (b) W distribution; (c) SLW distribution; (d)TW distribution; (e) GW distribution; and (f) weight loss from TW to GW of n = 1165 sea cucumbers, loss is indicated as a percentage and shown in bold. L: dorsal body length; W: dorsal body width; SLW: square root of length multiplied by width; TW: total weight; GW: gutted weight; SD: standard deviation; and CV: coefficient of variation in percentage, lowest value is shown in bold.
Mentions: A total of 2347 sea cucumbers were measured during the study period, and five frequency distributions analyzed from the body length (L), width (W), total weight (TW), muscle wet weight or gutted weight (GW) measurements, and the compound index SLW (the square root of the length-width product) (Fig. 1). Mean body length ± SD (25.3 ± 5.2 cm; Fig. 1a) was almost twice mean body width (14.2 ± 3.1 cm; Fig. 1b), with sizes ranging from 3 to 45 cm and a population mode of 23 cm. The SLW frequency distribution showed the minimum coefficient of variance (18.6%; Fig. 1c), whereas the maximum coefficient of variance (56.9%) was observed in the GW frequency distribution (Fig. 1e). The SLW distribution was multimodal and ranged from 2.4 to 28.3 cm. Both the TW and GW frequency distributions were unimodal (mode = 600 g and 400 g, respectively). The TW frequency distribution had a mean of 552 ± 263 g with weights ranging from 1 to 1800 g (Fig. 1d). Weight loss from TW to GW was 37.5% (Fig. 1f) and, contrary to expectations, coefficient of variation (CV) was higher for GW than for TW.

Bottom Line: In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW).Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index.Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Departamento de Recursos del Mar, Cinvestav, Carretera Antigua a Progreso km 6, 97310 Merida, Yucatan, Mexico [2] Centro Regional de Investigaciones Pesqueras de Yucalpeten, Instituto Nacional de Pesca, Blvd. del Pescador S/N, Puerto de Abrigo, 97320 Progreso, Yucatan, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Age and growth analysis is essential to fisheries management. Indirect methods to calculate growth are widely used; however, length frequency data analysis in sea cucumbers is complicated by high data variability caused by body wall elasticity. Here we calculated Isostichopus badionotus parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function. In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW). Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index. Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency. Slow or zero growth periods were observed during October and November, when weather conditions were adverse.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus