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Realization of deep subwavelength resolution with singular media.

Xu S, Jiang Y, Xu H, Wang J, Lin S, Chen H, Zhang B - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: The record of imaging resolution has kept being refreshed in the past decades and the best resolution of hyperlenses and superlenses so far is about one out of tens in terms of wavelength.The meta-lens is made of subwavelength metal/air layers, which exhibit singular medium property over a broad band.As a proof of concept, the subwavelength imaging ability is demonstrated over a broad frequency band from 1.5-10 GHz with the resolution varying from 1/117 to 1/17 wavelength experimentally.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] The Electromagnetics Academy at Zhejiang University, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China [3] Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371, Singapore [4] Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
The record of imaging resolution has kept being refreshed in the past decades and the best resolution of hyperlenses and superlenses so far is about one out of tens in terms of wavelength. In this paper, by adopting a hybrid concept of transformation optics and singular media, we report a broadband meta-lens design methodology with ultra-high resolution. The meta-lens is made of subwavelength metal/air layers, which exhibit singular medium property over a broad band. As a proof of concept, the subwavelength imaging ability is demonstrated over a broad frequency band from 1.5-10 GHz with the resolution varying from 1/117 to 1/17 wavelength experimentally.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The results at 1.5 GHz are enclosed in the top panel (a–c) while the results at 10 GHz are enclosed in the bottom panel (d–f): the simulated field distributions (a, d) for the case without meta-lens and (b, e) for the case with meta-lens, and (c, f) the image intensity normalized by the input intensity.In the experiment, the distance between the receiver and the center is 0.6 m.
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f4: The results at 1.5 GHz are enclosed in the top panel (a–c) while the results at 10 GHz are enclosed in the bottom panel (d–f): the simulated field distributions (a, d) for the case without meta-lens and (b, e) for the case with meta-lens, and (c, f) the image intensity normalized by the input intensity.In the experiment, the distance between the receiver and the center is 0.6 m.

Mentions: Both simulations and experiments are carried out in microwave regime to verify our idea. For the case of free space (Fig. 4(a)), the field distribution of two point sources with the distance 1.7 mm is identical to the one of a single point source because the distance between two point sources is far less than half of free space wavelength at 1.5 GHz. However, for the case of sources with our meta-lens, the TM waves excited by the same pair of point sources can be efficiently separated (Fig. 4(b)). In the experiment, the distance between the receiver and the center is 0.6 m. The scanning angle ϕ varies from 0 to 180 degree. The experimental results at 1.5 GHz agree well with simulated results (Fig. 4(c)). Moreover, in order to verify the broadband property of our meta-lens design, we measured the field at different frequencies. Fig. 4(d–f) are the experimental results at 10 GHz, from which one can see that the two points can also be efficiently separated in the imaging plane, indicating that our meta-lens can overcome the diffraction limit from 1.5 GHz to 10 GHz with the resolution varying from 1/117 to 1/17 wavelength.


Realization of deep subwavelength resolution with singular media.

Xu S, Jiang Y, Xu H, Wang J, Lin S, Chen H, Zhang B - Sci Rep (2014)

The results at 1.5 GHz are enclosed in the top panel (a–c) while the results at 10 GHz are enclosed in the bottom panel (d–f): the simulated field distributions (a, d) for the case without meta-lens and (b, e) for the case with meta-lens, and (c, f) the image intensity normalized by the input intensity.In the experiment, the distance between the receiver and the center is 0.6 m.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4048882&req=5

f4: The results at 1.5 GHz are enclosed in the top panel (a–c) while the results at 10 GHz are enclosed in the bottom panel (d–f): the simulated field distributions (a, d) for the case without meta-lens and (b, e) for the case with meta-lens, and (c, f) the image intensity normalized by the input intensity.In the experiment, the distance between the receiver and the center is 0.6 m.
Mentions: Both simulations and experiments are carried out in microwave regime to verify our idea. For the case of free space (Fig. 4(a)), the field distribution of two point sources with the distance 1.7 mm is identical to the one of a single point source because the distance between two point sources is far less than half of free space wavelength at 1.5 GHz. However, for the case of sources with our meta-lens, the TM waves excited by the same pair of point sources can be efficiently separated (Fig. 4(b)). In the experiment, the distance between the receiver and the center is 0.6 m. The scanning angle ϕ varies from 0 to 180 degree. The experimental results at 1.5 GHz agree well with simulated results (Fig. 4(c)). Moreover, in order to verify the broadband property of our meta-lens design, we measured the field at different frequencies. Fig. 4(d–f) are the experimental results at 10 GHz, from which one can see that the two points can also be efficiently separated in the imaging plane, indicating that our meta-lens can overcome the diffraction limit from 1.5 GHz to 10 GHz with the resolution varying from 1/117 to 1/17 wavelength.

Bottom Line: The record of imaging resolution has kept being refreshed in the past decades and the best resolution of hyperlenses and superlenses so far is about one out of tens in terms of wavelength.The meta-lens is made of subwavelength metal/air layers, which exhibit singular medium property over a broad band.As a proof of concept, the subwavelength imaging ability is demonstrated over a broad frequency band from 1.5-10 GHz with the resolution varying from 1/117 to 1/17 wavelength experimentally.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] The Electromagnetics Academy at Zhejiang University, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China [3] Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371, Singapore [4] Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
The record of imaging resolution has kept being refreshed in the past decades and the best resolution of hyperlenses and superlenses so far is about one out of tens in terms of wavelength. In this paper, by adopting a hybrid concept of transformation optics and singular media, we report a broadband meta-lens design methodology with ultra-high resolution. The meta-lens is made of subwavelength metal/air layers, which exhibit singular medium property over a broad band. As a proof of concept, the subwavelength imaging ability is demonstrated over a broad frequency band from 1.5-10 GHz with the resolution varying from 1/117 to 1/17 wavelength experimentally.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus