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Nonlinear photoacoustic signal amplification from single targets in absorption background.

Sarimollaoglu M, Nedosekin DA, Menyaev YA, Juratli MA, Zharov VP - Photoacoustics (2014)

Bottom Line: This approach was demonstrated by using nonlinear PA flow cytometry platform for label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells in blood background in vitro and in vivo.Nonlinearly amplified PA signals from overheated melanin nanoclusters in melanoma cells became detectable above still linear blood background.Nonlinear nanobubble-based photoacoustics provide new opportunities to significantly (5-20-fold) increase PA contrast of single nanoparticles, cells, viruses and bacteria in complex biological environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham St., Little Rock, AR USA 72205.

ABSTRACT
Photoacoustic (PA) detection of single absorbing targets such as nanoparticles or cells can be limited by absorption background. We show here that this problem can be overcome by using the nonlinear photoacoustics based on the differences in PA signal dependences on the laser energy from targets and background. Among different nonlinear phenomena, we focused on laser generation of nanobubbles as more efficient PA signal amplifiers from strongly absorbing, highly localized targets in the presence of spatially homogenous absorption background generating linear signals only. This approach was demonstrated by using nonlinear PA flow cytometry platform for label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells in blood background in vitro and in vivo. Nonlinearly amplified PA signals from overheated melanin nanoclusters in melanoma cells became detectable above still linear blood background. Nonlinear nanobubble-based photoacoustics provide new opportunities to significantly (5-20-fold) increase PA contrast of single nanoparticles, cells, viruses and bacteria in complex biological environments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PA signal amplitudes from melanoma cells as function of laser energy fluence. PA signals from cells in PBS (a and b) and in blood (c and d) were acquired using single laser pulses (a and c), and by averaging 100 consecutive signals (b and d). Bars are mean ± SEM. Lines represent the linear or nonlinear (first order exponential for the top three [high, medium, low] pigmentation groups and first order polynomial model for the rest of the subjects [very-low pigmented cells, PBS, and blood]) regression fit of the data. Dashed lines indicate the points that were excluded from regression.
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fig0025: PA signal amplitudes from melanoma cells as function of laser energy fluence. PA signals from cells in PBS (a and b) and in blood (c and d) were acquired using single laser pulses (a and c), and by averaging 100 consecutive signals (b and d). Bars are mean ± SEM. Lines represent the linear or nonlinear (first order exponential for the top three [high, medium, low] pigmentation groups and first order polynomial model for the rest of the subjects [very-low pigmented cells, PBS, and blood]) regression fit of the data. Dashed lines indicate the points that were excluded from regression.

Mentions: Within the relatively high energy range (0–800 mJ/cm2) used, PA signals of very low-pigmented cells and blood exhibited linear dependence, while most pigmented cells revealed nonlinear behavior (Fig. 5). Due to the role of laser-induced nanobubbles as nonlinear PT-PA signal amplifiers, we observed significant (5–20-fold) PA signal amplification from melanoma cells with heterogeneous melanin distribution (Fig. 5c and Supplementary Fig. 5a). Blood, on the other hand, exhibited linear signals because of the relatively homogeneous spatial distribution of Hb in RBCs, which prevented overheating and bubble formation.


Nonlinear photoacoustic signal amplification from single targets in absorption background.

Sarimollaoglu M, Nedosekin DA, Menyaev YA, Juratli MA, Zharov VP - Photoacoustics (2014)

PA signal amplitudes from melanoma cells as function of laser energy fluence. PA signals from cells in PBS (a and b) and in blood (c and d) were acquired using single laser pulses (a and c), and by averaging 100 consecutive signals (b and d). Bars are mean ± SEM. Lines represent the linear or nonlinear (first order exponential for the top three [high, medium, low] pigmentation groups and first order polynomial model for the rest of the subjects [very-low pigmented cells, PBS, and blood]) regression fit of the data. Dashed lines indicate the points that were excluded from regression.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4048727&req=5

fig0025: PA signal amplitudes from melanoma cells as function of laser energy fluence. PA signals from cells in PBS (a and b) and in blood (c and d) were acquired using single laser pulses (a and c), and by averaging 100 consecutive signals (b and d). Bars are mean ± SEM. Lines represent the linear or nonlinear (first order exponential for the top three [high, medium, low] pigmentation groups and first order polynomial model for the rest of the subjects [very-low pigmented cells, PBS, and blood]) regression fit of the data. Dashed lines indicate the points that were excluded from regression.
Mentions: Within the relatively high energy range (0–800 mJ/cm2) used, PA signals of very low-pigmented cells and blood exhibited linear dependence, while most pigmented cells revealed nonlinear behavior (Fig. 5). Due to the role of laser-induced nanobubbles as nonlinear PT-PA signal amplifiers, we observed significant (5–20-fold) PA signal amplification from melanoma cells with heterogeneous melanin distribution (Fig. 5c and Supplementary Fig. 5a). Blood, on the other hand, exhibited linear signals because of the relatively homogeneous spatial distribution of Hb in RBCs, which prevented overheating and bubble formation.

Bottom Line: This approach was demonstrated by using nonlinear PA flow cytometry platform for label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells in blood background in vitro and in vivo.Nonlinearly amplified PA signals from overheated melanin nanoclusters in melanoma cells became detectable above still linear blood background.Nonlinear nanobubble-based photoacoustics provide new opportunities to significantly (5-20-fold) increase PA contrast of single nanoparticles, cells, viruses and bacteria in complex biological environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham St., Little Rock, AR USA 72205.

ABSTRACT
Photoacoustic (PA) detection of single absorbing targets such as nanoparticles or cells can be limited by absorption background. We show here that this problem can be overcome by using the nonlinear photoacoustics based on the differences in PA signal dependences on the laser energy from targets and background. Among different nonlinear phenomena, we focused on laser generation of nanobubbles as more efficient PA signal amplifiers from strongly absorbing, highly localized targets in the presence of spatially homogenous absorption background generating linear signals only. This approach was demonstrated by using nonlinear PA flow cytometry platform for label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells in blood background in vitro and in vivo. Nonlinearly amplified PA signals from overheated melanin nanoclusters in melanoma cells became detectable above still linear blood background. Nonlinear nanobubble-based photoacoustics provide new opportunities to significantly (5-20-fold) increase PA contrast of single nanoparticles, cells, viruses and bacteria in complex biological environments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus