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The content of soyasaponin and soyasapogenol in soy foods and their estimated intake in the Japanese.

Kamo S, Suzuki S, Sato T - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

Bottom Line: The majority of the soyasapogenol detected was soyasapogenol B rather than soyasapogenol A, resulting in speculation that further steps are required to liberate aglycones from glycoside-conjugated soyasaponins in soyasapogenol A.The soyasapogenol content and the soyasapogenol to total soyasaponin ratio was considerably low in most soy products, except for long-term maturated miso.The major source of the daily intake of soyasaponins and soyasapogenols were tofu and miso, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fine Chemical Laboratory, J-OIL MILLS, Inc. 1746, Nakashinden, Fukuroi-shi, Shizuoka, 437-1111, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Soyasaponins have been reported to promote various health functions. However, the total soyasaponin and soyasapogenol content in soy products and the daily intake remain to be fully elucidated. We developed a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometric (HPLC-MS/MS) method to evaluate the content of group A and B soyasaponins and soyasapogenols. The total soyasaponin content was measured after pretreatment converted soyasaponins to soyasapogenols. The total soyasaponin content in soy foods was 200-1800 nmol g(-1), although that of soy sauce was 2-7 nmol g(-1). The soyasapogenol to total soyasaponin ratio was 30-50% in long-term matured miso. The majority of the soyasapogenol detected was soyasapogenol B rather than soyasapogenol A, resulting in speculation that further steps are required to liberate aglycones from glycoside-conjugated soyasaponins in soyasapogenol A. We estimated the daily intake of total soyasaponins and soyasapogenols by the Japanese, which was 50.3 and 0.59 μmol, respectively. The soyasapogenol content and the soyasapogenol to total soyasaponin ratio was considerably low in most soy products, except for long-term maturated miso. The major source of the daily intake of soyasaponins and soyasapogenols were tofu and miso, respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Average daily intake of soyasaponins and soyasapogenols in the Japanese. The daily intake of soyasaponins (left axis) and the daily intake of soyasapogenols (right axis). The daily intake of soy foods is derived from The National Health and Nutrition Survey, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (2005)
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fig02: Average daily intake of soyasaponins and soyasapogenols in the Japanese. The daily intake of soyasaponins (left axis) and the daily intake of soyasapogenols (right axis). The daily intake of soy foods is derived from The National Health and Nutrition Survey, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (2005)

Mentions: The daily average soy foods consumption levels in the Japanese were as follows: tofu = 36.3 g, natto = 6.5 g, miso = 12.5 g, deep-fried tofu = 7.4 g, soy sauce = 17.4 g, toasted soybean flour = 1.9 g, and others (including soy milk and tempeh) = 1.4 g. As shown in Figure 2, the intakes of group A soyasaponins, group B soyasaponins, and total soyasaponins were estimated to be 13.9 μmol day−1 (20.0 mg day−1 soyasaponin A1 equivalent), 39.1 μmol day−1 (36.8 mg day−1 soyasaponin I equivalent), and 53.0 μmol day−1 (56.8 mg day−1 soyasaponin A1 and I equivalent combined), respectively. The types and amounts of soy foods consumed varied among individuals. Several surveys of soy isoflavone intake from soy foods have been conducted. The average intake of soy isoflavones was found to be 39.46 mg (7.8–87.7 mg) (Kimira et al. 1998). Japanese government research has shown that the variation in soy foods intake is quite high. The estimated intake value for the 95th percentile was 2.8 times higher than the average intake (Ishimi 2001). The variation in the soyasaponin intake appeared to be at the same degree to that of soy isoflavone.


The content of soyasaponin and soyasapogenol in soy foods and their estimated intake in the Japanese.

Kamo S, Suzuki S, Sato T - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

Average daily intake of soyasaponins and soyasapogenols in the Japanese. The daily intake of soyasaponins (left axis) and the daily intake of soyasapogenols (right axis). The daily intake of soy foods is derived from The National Health and Nutrition Survey, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (2005)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4048615&req=5

fig02: Average daily intake of soyasaponins and soyasapogenols in the Japanese. The daily intake of soyasaponins (left axis) and the daily intake of soyasapogenols (right axis). The daily intake of soy foods is derived from The National Health and Nutrition Survey, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (2005)
Mentions: The daily average soy foods consumption levels in the Japanese were as follows: tofu = 36.3 g, natto = 6.5 g, miso = 12.5 g, deep-fried tofu = 7.4 g, soy sauce = 17.4 g, toasted soybean flour = 1.9 g, and others (including soy milk and tempeh) = 1.4 g. As shown in Figure 2, the intakes of group A soyasaponins, group B soyasaponins, and total soyasaponins were estimated to be 13.9 μmol day−1 (20.0 mg day−1 soyasaponin A1 equivalent), 39.1 μmol day−1 (36.8 mg day−1 soyasaponin I equivalent), and 53.0 μmol day−1 (56.8 mg day−1 soyasaponin A1 and I equivalent combined), respectively. The types and amounts of soy foods consumed varied among individuals. Several surveys of soy isoflavone intake from soy foods have been conducted. The average intake of soy isoflavones was found to be 39.46 mg (7.8–87.7 mg) (Kimira et al. 1998). Japanese government research has shown that the variation in soy foods intake is quite high. The estimated intake value for the 95th percentile was 2.8 times higher than the average intake (Ishimi 2001). The variation in the soyasaponin intake appeared to be at the same degree to that of soy isoflavone.

Bottom Line: The majority of the soyasapogenol detected was soyasapogenol B rather than soyasapogenol A, resulting in speculation that further steps are required to liberate aglycones from glycoside-conjugated soyasaponins in soyasapogenol A.The soyasapogenol content and the soyasapogenol to total soyasaponin ratio was considerably low in most soy products, except for long-term maturated miso.The major source of the daily intake of soyasaponins and soyasapogenols were tofu and miso, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fine Chemical Laboratory, J-OIL MILLS, Inc. 1746, Nakashinden, Fukuroi-shi, Shizuoka, 437-1111, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Soyasaponins have been reported to promote various health functions. However, the total soyasaponin and soyasapogenol content in soy products and the daily intake remain to be fully elucidated. We developed a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometric (HPLC-MS/MS) method to evaluate the content of group A and B soyasaponins and soyasapogenols. The total soyasaponin content was measured after pretreatment converted soyasaponins to soyasapogenols. The total soyasaponin content in soy foods was 200-1800 nmol g(-1), although that of soy sauce was 2-7 nmol g(-1). The soyasapogenol to total soyasaponin ratio was 30-50% in long-term matured miso. The majority of the soyasapogenol detected was soyasapogenol B rather than soyasapogenol A, resulting in speculation that further steps are required to liberate aglycones from glycoside-conjugated soyasaponins in soyasapogenol A. We estimated the daily intake of total soyasaponins and soyasapogenols by the Japanese, which was 50.3 and 0.59 μmol, respectively. The soyasapogenol content and the soyasapogenol to total soyasaponin ratio was considerably low in most soy products, except for long-term maturated miso. The major source of the daily intake of soyasaponins and soyasapogenols were tofu and miso, respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus