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Is a coded physical activity diary valid for assessing physical activity level and energy expenditure in stroke patients?

Vanroy C, Vanlandewijck Y, Cras P, Feys H, Truijen S, Michielsen M, Vissers D - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Data from the patients' diaries were compared with observed and measured data to determine total activity (METs*minutes), activity level and total energy expenditure.Comparisons between the patients' diaries and activity monitor data revealed a low correlation (rs 0.29) for total METs*minutes and energy expenditure.Given the poor correlation with objective measurements of physical activity, however, further research is needed to validate its use against a gold-standard measure of physical activity intensity and energy expenditure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium; Translational Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium; KU Leuven, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: to determine the concurrent validity of a physical activity diary for measuring physical activity level and total energy expenditure in hospitalized stroke patients.

Method: Sixteen stroke patients kept coded activity diaries and wore SenseWear Pro2 multi-sensor activity monitors during daytime hours for one day. A researcher observed the patients and completed a diary. Data from the patients' diaries were compared with observed and measured data to determine total activity (METs*minutes), activity level and total energy expenditure.

Results: Spearman correlations between the patients' and researchers' diaries revealed a high correlation for total METs*minutes (rs = 0.75, p<0.01) for sedentary (rs = 0.74,p<0.01) and moderate activities (rs = 0.71,p<0.01) and a very high correlation (rs = 0.92, p<0.01) for the total energy expenditure. Comparisons between the patients' diaries and activity monitor data revealed a low correlation (rs 0.29) for total METs*minutes and energy expenditure.

Conclusion: Coded self-monitoring activity diaries appear feasible as a low-tech alternative to labor-intensive observational diaries for determining sedentary, moderate, and total physical activity and for quantifying energy expenditure in hospitalized stroke patients. Given the poor correlation with objective measurements of physical activity, however, further research is needed to validate its use against a gold-standard measure of physical activity intensity and energy expenditure.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparing total Mets*minutes in 16 stroke patients: activity monitor versus patient diary.Total Mets*minutes of activity monitor was compared with diary of stroke patients. Broken horizontal lines represent percentiles 25 and 75, bold solid lines represent the median value of difference. Data analysis showed no good level of agreement between patient diary and the activity monitor (Median = 352.24; P25 = 242.44; P75 = 601.46). Visual inspection revealed no systematic bias.
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pone-0098735-g002: Comparing total Mets*minutes in 16 stroke patients: activity monitor versus patient diary.Total Mets*minutes of activity monitor was compared with diary of stroke patients. Broken horizontal lines represent percentiles 25 and 75, bold solid lines represent the median value of difference. Data analysis showed no good level of agreement between patient diary and the activity monitor (Median = 352.24; P25 = 242.44; P75 = 601.46). Visual inspection revealed no systematic bias.

Mentions: Graphic analysis indicated a good level of agreement between both diaries (median value of the difference = 85.50; P25 = 3.00; P75 = 141.75) (Figure 1). Data points were clustered around zero. Less agreement was found between the patients' diaries and the SWP2A (median value of the difference = 352.24; P25 = 242.44; P75 = 601.46) (Figure 2). Lower total METs*minutes for all patients was observed in comparison with the patients' diaries. Visual inspection revealed no systematic bias.


Is a coded physical activity diary valid for assessing physical activity level and energy expenditure in stroke patients?

Vanroy C, Vanlandewijck Y, Cras P, Feys H, Truijen S, Michielsen M, Vissers D - PLoS ONE (2014)

Comparing total Mets*minutes in 16 stroke patients: activity monitor versus patient diary.Total Mets*minutes of activity monitor was compared with diary of stroke patients. Broken horizontal lines represent percentiles 25 and 75, bold solid lines represent the median value of difference. Data analysis showed no good level of agreement between patient diary and the activity monitor (Median = 352.24; P25 = 242.44; P75 = 601.46). Visual inspection revealed no systematic bias.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4048313&req=5

pone-0098735-g002: Comparing total Mets*minutes in 16 stroke patients: activity monitor versus patient diary.Total Mets*minutes of activity monitor was compared with diary of stroke patients. Broken horizontal lines represent percentiles 25 and 75, bold solid lines represent the median value of difference. Data analysis showed no good level of agreement between patient diary and the activity monitor (Median = 352.24; P25 = 242.44; P75 = 601.46). Visual inspection revealed no systematic bias.
Mentions: Graphic analysis indicated a good level of agreement between both diaries (median value of the difference = 85.50; P25 = 3.00; P75 = 141.75) (Figure 1). Data points were clustered around zero. Less agreement was found between the patients' diaries and the SWP2A (median value of the difference = 352.24; P25 = 242.44; P75 = 601.46) (Figure 2). Lower total METs*minutes for all patients was observed in comparison with the patients' diaries. Visual inspection revealed no systematic bias.

Bottom Line: Data from the patients' diaries were compared with observed and measured data to determine total activity (METs*minutes), activity level and total energy expenditure.Comparisons between the patients' diaries and activity monitor data revealed a low correlation (rs 0.29) for total METs*minutes and energy expenditure.Given the poor correlation with objective measurements of physical activity, however, further research is needed to validate its use against a gold-standard measure of physical activity intensity and energy expenditure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium; Translational Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium; KU Leuven, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: to determine the concurrent validity of a physical activity diary for measuring physical activity level and total energy expenditure in hospitalized stroke patients.

Method: Sixteen stroke patients kept coded activity diaries and wore SenseWear Pro2 multi-sensor activity monitors during daytime hours for one day. A researcher observed the patients and completed a diary. Data from the patients' diaries were compared with observed and measured data to determine total activity (METs*minutes), activity level and total energy expenditure.

Results: Spearman correlations between the patients' and researchers' diaries revealed a high correlation for total METs*minutes (rs = 0.75, p<0.01) for sedentary (rs = 0.74,p<0.01) and moderate activities (rs = 0.71,p<0.01) and a very high correlation (rs = 0.92, p<0.01) for the total energy expenditure. Comparisons between the patients' diaries and activity monitor data revealed a low correlation (rs 0.29) for total METs*minutes and energy expenditure.

Conclusion: Coded self-monitoring activity diaries appear feasible as a low-tech alternative to labor-intensive observational diaries for determining sedentary, moderate, and total physical activity and for quantifying energy expenditure in hospitalized stroke patients. Given the poor correlation with objective measurements of physical activity, however, further research is needed to validate its use against a gold-standard measure of physical activity intensity and energy expenditure.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus