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EMG and heart rate responses decline within 5 days of daily whole-body vibration training with squatting.

Rosenberger A, Liphardt AM, Bargmann A, Müller K, Beck L, Mester J, Zange J - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The heart rate (HR) response was significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE on all training days, but showed a constant decline throughout the training days.On training day 1, blood lactate increased significantly more after SE+V than after SE (P<0.05).On the following training days, this difference became much smaller but remained significantly different.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Aerospace Medicine, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Cologne, Germany; Institute of Training Science and Sport Informatics, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we examined the acute effects of a 5-day daily whole-body vibration (WBV) training on electromyography (EMG) responses of the m. rectus femoris and m. gastrocnemius lateralis, heart rate (HR, continuously recorded), and blood lactate levels. The purpose of the study was to investigate the adaptation of muscle activity, heart rate and blood lactate levels during 5 days of daily training. Two groups of healthy male subjects performed either squat exercises with vibration at 20 Hz on a side alternating platform (SE+V, n = 20, age  = 31.9±7.5 yrs., height  = 178.8±6.2 cm, body mass  = 79.2±11.4 kg) or squat exercises alone (SE, n = 21, age  = 28.4±7.3 years, height  = 178.9±7.4 cm, body mass  = 77.2±9.7 kg). On training day 1, EMG amplitudes of the m. rectus femoris were significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE. However, this difference was no longer statistically significant on training days 3 and 5. The heart rate (HR) response was significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE on all training days, but showed a constant decline throughout the training days. On training day 1, blood lactate increased significantly more after SE+V than after SE (P<0.05). On the following training days, this difference became much smaller but remained significantly different. The specific physiological responses to WBV were largest on the initial training day and most of them declined during subsequent training days, showing a rapid neuromuscular and cardiovascular adaptation to the vibration stimulus.

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Heart rate changes during squat exercises.The changes from the baseline values (means ±SD) of all of the subjects in the heart rate (HR, min−1) during squat exercises in SE+V (○, n = 19) and SE (•, n = 20) on training days 1, 2, 4, and 5. P-values were calculated for intervention group effects by repeated measures ANOVA.
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pone-0099060-g005: Heart rate changes during squat exercises.The changes from the baseline values (means ±SD) of all of the subjects in the heart rate (HR, min−1) during squat exercises in SE+V (○, n = 19) and SE (•, n = 20) on training days 1, 2, 4, and 5. P-values were calculated for intervention group effects by repeated measures ANOVA.

Mentions: In the SE group, squatting alone caused significant changes in HR compared with the baseline values (Figure 5). On training day 1, HR increased by 16±7 min−1 during series 1 and increased further to reach a delta value of 29±12 min−1 during series 10 (Figure 5). On the following training days, the HR response to SE was similar during each training session. Between the training days, HR response to training was not significantly different in the SE group.


EMG and heart rate responses decline within 5 days of daily whole-body vibration training with squatting.

Rosenberger A, Liphardt AM, Bargmann A, Müller K, Beck L, Mester J, Zange J - PLoS ONE (2014)

Heart rate changes during squat exercises.The changes from the baseline values (means ±SD) of all of the subjects in the heart rate (HR, min−1) during squat exercises in SE+V (○, n = 19) and SE (•, n = 20) on training days 1, 2, 4, and 5. P-values were calculated for intervention group effects by repeated measures ANOVA.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4048290&req=5

pone-0099060-g005: Heart rate changes during squat exercises.The changes from the baseline values (means ±SD) of all of the subjects in the heart rate (HR, min−1) during squat exercises in SE+V (○, n = 19) and SE (•, n = 20) on training days 1, 2, 4, and 5. P-values were calculated for intervention group effects by repeated measures ANOVA.
Mentions: In the SE group, squatting alone caused significant changes in HR compared with the baseline values (Figure 5). On training day 1, HR increased by 16±7 min−1 during series 1 and increased further to reach a delta value of 29±12 min−1 during series 10 (Figure 5). On the following training days, the HR response to SE was similar during each training session. Between the training days, HR response to training was not significantly different in the SE group.

Bottom Line: The heart rate (HR) response was significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE on all training days, but showed a constant decline throughout the training days.On training day 1, blood lactate increased significantly more after SE+V than after SE (P<0.05).On the following training days, this difference became much smaller but remained significantly different.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Aerospace Medicine, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Cologne, Germany; Institute of Training Science and Sport Informatics, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we examined the acute effects of a 5-day daily whole-body vibration (WBV) training on electromyography (EMG) responses of the m. rectus femoris and m. gastrocnemius lateralis, heart rate (HR, continuously recorded), and blood lactate levels. The purpose of the study was to investigate the adaptation of muscle activity, heart rate and blood lactate levels during 5 days of daily training. Two groups of healthy male subjects performed either squat exercises with vibration at 20 Hz on a side alternating platform (SE+V, n = 20, age  = 31.9±7.5 yrs., height  = 178.8±6.2 cm, body mass  = 79.2±11.4 kg) or squat exercises alone (SE, n = 21, age  = 28.4±7.3 years, height  = 178.9±7.4 cm, body mass  = 77.2±9.7 kg). On training day 1, EMG amplitudes of the m. rectus femoris were significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE. However, this difference was no longer statistically significant on training days 3 and 5. The heart rate (HR) response was significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE on all training days, but showed a constant decline throughout the training days. On training day 1, blood lactate increased significantly more after SE+V than after SE (P<0.05). On the following training days, this difference became much smaller but remained significantly different. The specific physiological responses to WBV were largest on the initial training day and most of them declined during subsequent training days, showing a rapid neuromuscular and cardiovascular adaptation to the vibration stimulus.

Show MeSH