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Oxidative stress in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: is it affected by a single bout of prolonged exercise?

Francescato MP, Stel G, Geat M, Cauci S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Patients showed higher oxidative stress values as compared to controls (95.9±9.7 vs. 74.1±12.2 mg·L(-1) H2O2; p<0.001).Oxidative stress was positively correlated to HbA1c (p<0.005) and negatively related with uric acid (p<0.005).Specifically, we found that the oxidative stress was not exacerbated due to a single bout of prolonged moderate intensity aerobic exercise, a condition simulating several outdoor leisure time physical activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Udine, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Presently, no clear-cut guidelines are available to suggest the more appropriate physical activity for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus due to paucity of experimental data obtained under patients' usual life conditions. Accordingly, we explored the oxidative stress levels associated with a prolonged moderate intensity, but fatiguing, exercise performed under usual therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and matched healthy controls. Eight patients (4 men, 4 women; 49±11 years; Body Mass Index 25.0±3.2 kg·m(-2); HbA1c 57±10 mmol·mol(-1)) and 14 controls (8 men, 6 women; 47±11 years; Body Mass Index 24.3±3.3 kg·m(-2)) performed a 3-h walk at 30% of their heart rate reserve. Venous blood samples were obtained before and at the end of the exercise for clinical chemistry analysis and antioxidant capacity. Capillary blood samples were taken at the start and thereafter every 30 min to determine lipid peroxidation. Patients showed higher oxidative stress values as compared to controls (95.9±9.7 vs. 74.1±12.2 mg·L(-1) H2O2; p<0.001). In both groups, oxidative stress remained constant throughout the exercise (p = NS), while oxidative defence increased significantly at the end of exercise (p<0.02) from 1.16±0.13 to 1.19±0.10 mmol·L(-1) Trolox in patients and from 1.09±0.21 to 1.22±0.14 mmol·L(-1) Trolox in controls, without any significant difference between the two groups. Oxidative stress was positively correlated to HbA1c (p<0.005) and negatively related with uric acid (p<0.005). In conclusion, we were the first to evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with type 1 diabetes exercising under their usual life conditions (i.e. usual therapy and diet). Specifically, we found that the oxidative stress was not exacerbated due to a single bout of prolonged moderate intensity aerobic exercise, a condition simulating several outdoor leisure time physical activities. Oxidative defence increased in both patients and controls, suggesting beneficial effects of prolonged aerobic fatiguing exercise.

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Glycemia and insulin concentration before and at the end of the 3-h exercises.Panel A. Glycemia (mmol·L−1) was significantly higher in patients both before and at the end of the exercise (p<0.01) and decreased significantly in patients with type 1 DM at the end of the trial (p<0.05). Panel B. Insulin concentration (pmol·L−1) was significantly higher in patients both before and at the end of the exercise (p<0.001) and decreased significantly in both groups at the end of the trial (p<0.005). In both panels: shaded boxes = patients, open boxes = healthy control subjects.
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pone-0099062-g001: Glycemia and insulin concentration before and at the end of the 3-h exercises.Panel A. Glycemia (mmol·L−1) was significantly higher in patients both before and at the end of the exercise (p<0.01) and decreased significantly in patients with type 1 DM at the end of the trial (p<0.05). Panel B. Insulin concentration (pmol·L−1) was significantly higher in patients both before and at the end of the exercise (p<0.001) and decreased significantly in both groups at the end of the trial (p<0.005). In both panels: shaded boxes = patients, open boxes = healthy control subjects.

Mentions: Both at the start and the end of exercise, glycemia was significantly higher in patients than in controls (Figure 1, panel A; group effect, F = 19.04, p<0.001). Glycemia followed a different behavior in the two groups (group × time effect, F = 11.22, p<0.005); in controls glycemia did not change significantly throughout the exercises (time effect, F = 0.01, p = NS) amounting on average to 4.6±0.5 mmol·L−1, whereas in patients glycemia fell significantly from 8.0±2.7 mmol·L−1 at the start to 5.9±1.6 mmol·L−1 at the end of the exercise (time effect, F = 7.21, p<0.05).


Oxidative stress in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: is it affected by a single bout of prolonged exercise?

Francescato MP, Stel G, Geat M, Cauci S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Glycemia and insulin concentration before and at the end of the 3-h exercises.Panel A. Glycemia (mmol·L−1) was significantly higher in patients both before and at the end of the exercise (p<0.01) and decreased significantly in patients with type 1 DM at the end of the trial (p<0.05). Panel B. Insulin concentration (pmol·L−1) was significantly higher in patients both before and at the end of the exercise (p<0.001) and decreased significantly in both groups at the end of the trial (p<0.005). In both panels: shaded boxes = patients, open boxes = healthy control subjects.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4048225&req=5

pone-0099062-g001: Glycemia and insulin concentration before and at the end of the 3-h exercises.Panel A. Glycemia (mmol·L−1) was significantly higher in patients both before and at the end of the exercise (p<0.01) and decreased significantly in patients with type 1 DM at the end of the trial (p<0.05). Panel B. Insulin concentration (pmol·L−1) was significantly higher in patients both before and at the end of the exercise (p<0.001) and decreased significantly in both groups at the end of the trial (p<0.005). In both panels: shaded boxes = patients, open boxes = healthy control subjects.
Mentions: Both at the start and the end of exercise, glycemia was significantly higher in patients than in controls (Figure 1, panel A; group effect, F = 19.04, p<0.001). Glycemia followed a different behavior in the two groups (group × time effect, F = 11.22, p<0.005); in controls glycemia did not change significantly throughout the exercises (time effect, F = 0.01, p = NS) amounting on average to 4.6±0.5 mmol·L−1, whereas in patients glycemia fell significantly from 8.0±2.7 mmol·L−1 at the start to 5.9±1.6 mmol·L−1 at the end of the exercise (time effect, F = 7.21, p<0.05).

Bottom Line: Patients showed higher oxidative stress values as compared to controls (95.9±9.7 vs. 74.1±12.2 mg·L(-1) H2O2; p<0.001).Oxidative stress was positively correlated to HbA1c (p<0.005) and negatively related with uric acid (p<0.005).Specifically, we found that the oxidative stress was not exacerbated due to a single bout of prolonged moderate intensity aerobic exercise, a condition simulating several outdoor leisure time physical activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Udine, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Presently, no clear-cut guidelines are available to suggest the more appropriate physical activity for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus due to paucity of experimental data obtained under patients' usual life conditions. Accordingly, we explored the oxidative stress levels associated with a prolonged moderate intensity, but fatiguing, exercise performed under usual therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and matched healthy controls. Eight patients (4 men, 4 women; 49±11 years; Body Mass Index 25.0±3.2 kg·m(-2); HbA1c 57±10 mmol·mol(-1)) and 14 controls (8 men, 6 women; 47±11 years; Body Mass Index 24.3±3.3 kg·m(-2)) performed a 3-h walk at 30% of their heart rate reserve. Venous blood samples were obtained before and at the end of the exercise for clinical chemistry analysis and antioxidant capacity. Capillary blood samples were taken at the start and thereafter every 30 min to determine lipid peroxidation. Patients showed higher oxidative stress values as compared to controls (95.9±9.7 vs. 74.1±12.2 mg·L(-1) H2O2; p<0.001). In both groups, oxidative stress remained constant throughout the exercise (p = NS), while oxidative defence increased significantly at the end of exercise (p<0.02) from 1.16±0.13 to 1.19±0.10 mmol·L(-1) Trolox in patients and from 1.09±0.21 to 1.22±0.14 mmol·L(-1) Trolox in controls, without any significant difference between the two groups. Oxidative stress was positively correlated to HbA1c (p<0.005) and negatively related with uric acid (p<0.005). In conclusion, we were the first to evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with type 1 diabetes exercising under their usual life conditions (i.e. usual therapy and diet). Specifically, we found that the oxidative stress was not exacerbated due to a single bout of prolonged moderate intensity aerobic exercise, a condition simulating several outdoor leisure time physical activities. Oxidative defence increased in both patients and controls, suggesting beneficial effects of prolonged aerobic fatiguing exercise.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus