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Suboptimal vitamin D status in a population-based study of Asian children: prevalence and relation to allergic diseases and atopy.

Yao TC, Tu YL, Chang SW, Tsai HJ, Gu PW, Ning HC, Hua MC, Liao SL, Tsai MH, Chiu CY, Lai SH, Yeh KW, Huang JL, PATCH study groupHuang JL - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: After adjusting for potential confounders, serum 25(OH)D status had no association with asthma, rhinitis, eczema, atopy, or total serum IgE (all P>0.05).Low serum 25(OH)D levels are remarkably common in this population sample of Asian children, suggesting that millions of children living in Taiwan may have suboptimal levels of vitamin D, which should be a matter of public health concern.Our results provides epidemiological evidence against the association of vitamin D status with various allergic diseases and atopy in Asian children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Community Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: New evidence shows high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in many countries and some studies suggest a possible link between vitamin D status and allergic diseases. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of suboptimal vitamin D status in a population sample of Asian children and to investigate the relationship of vitamin D status with allergic diseases and atopy.

Methods: Children aged 5-18 years (N = 1315) in the Prediction of Allergies in Taiwanese CHildren (PATCH) study were evaluated using questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and total and specific immunoglobulin E (IgE).

Results: The mean concentration of serum 25(OH)D was 20.4 ng/mL (SD: 7.1 ng/mL). Vitamin D deficiency (defined as serum 25(OH)D<20 ng/mL) was present in 670 subjects (51.0%), while vitamin D insufficiency (defined as serum 25(OH)D<30 ng/mL) was observed in 1187 subjects (90.3%). Older age (P<0.001), female gender (P<0.001), higher body mass index (P = 0.001), winter and spring seasons (compared to summer; P both<0.001), and passive smoking (P = 0.011) were independently associated with low serum 25(OH)D levels. After adjusting for potential confounders, serum 25(OH)D status had no association with asthma, rhinitis, eczema, atopy, or total serum IgE (all P>0.05).

Conclusions: Low serum 25(OH)D levels are remarkably common in this population sample of Asian children, suggesting that millions of children living in Taiwan may have suboptimal levels of vitamin D, which should be a matter of public health concern. Our results provides epidemiological evidence against the association of vitamin D status with various allergic diseases and atopy in Asian children.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Serum 25(OH)D levels by (a) age (r = −0.273, P<0.001), (b) body mass index (r = −0.179, P<0.001), and (c) gender (P<0.001), season of sampling (P<0.001), and passive smoking (P = 0.003).
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pone-0099105-g003: Serum 25(OH)D levels by (a) age (r = −0.273, P<0.001), (b) body mass index (r = −0.179, P<0.001), and (c) gender (P<0.001), season of sampling (P<0.001), and passive smoking (P = 0.003).

Mentions: Univariate analysis revealed that age (P<0.001), gender (P<0.001), BMI (P<0.001), season (P<0.001), and passive smoking (P = 0.005) were associated with serum 25(OH)D status (Table 1). Serum 25(OH)D levels significantly decreased with age (r = −0.273, P<0.001; Figure 3a). BMI significantly and negatively correlated to serum 25(OH)D (r = −0.179, P<0.001; Figure 3b). Girls had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D than boys (mean ± SD, 19.2±6.9 vs. 21.6±7.2 ng/mL, P<0.001; Figure 3c). Subjects sampled in the winter (19.7±7.4 ng/mL) or spring (19.1±6.8 ng/mL) had lower serum 25(OH)D levels than did subjects sampled in the summer (24.4±6.3 ng/mL) (both P<0.001; Figure 3c). Subjects exposed to passive smoke at home had lower serum 25(OH)D levels than those did not (19.9±7.0 vs. 21.1±7.3 ng/mL, P = 0.003; Figure 3c).


Suboptimal vitamin D status in a population-based study of Asian children: prevalence and relation to allergic diseases and atopy.

Yao TC, Tu YL, Chang SW, Tsai HJ, Gu PW, Ning HC, Hua MC, Liao SL, Tsai MH, Chiu CY, Lai SH, Yeh KW, Huang JL, PATCH study groupHuang JL - PLoS ONE (2014)

Serum 25(OH)D levels by (a) age (r = −0.273, P<0.001), (b) body mass index (r = −0.179, P<0.001), and (c) gender (P<0.001), season of sampling (P<0.001), and passive smoking (P = 0.003).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4043968&req=5

pone-0099105-g003: Serum 25(OH)D levels by (a) age (r = −0.273, P<0.001), (b) body mass index (r = −0.179, P<0.001), and (c) gender (P<0.001), season of sampling (P<0.001), and passive smoking (P = 0.003).
Mentions: Univariate analysis revealed that age (P<0.001), gender (P<0.001), BMI (P<0.001), season (P<0.001), and passive smoking (P = 0.005) were associated with serum 25(OH)D status (Table 1). Serum 25(OH)D levels significantly decreased with age (r = −0.273, P<0.001; Figure 3a). BMI significantly and negatively correlated to serum 25(OH)D (r = −0.179, P<0.001; Figure 3b). Girls had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D than boys (mean ± SD, 19.2±6.9 vs. 21.6±7.2 ng/mL, P<0.001; Figure 3c). Subjects sampled in the winter (19.7±7.4 ng/mL) or spring (19.1±6.8 ng/mL) had lower serum 25(OH)D levels than did subjects sampled in the summer (24.4±6.3 ng/mL) (both P<0.001; Figure 3c). Subjects exposed to passive smoke at home had lower serum 25(OH)D levels than those did not (19.9±7.0 vs. 21.1±7.3 ng/mL, P = 0.003; Figure 3c).

Bottom Line: After adjusting for potential confounders, serum 25(OH)D status had no association with asthma, rhinitis, eczema, atopy, or total serum IgE (all P>0.05).Low serum 25(OH)D levels are remarkably common in this population sample of Asian children, suggesting that millions of children living in Taiwan may have suboptimal levels of vitamin D, which should be a matter of public health concern.Our results provides epidemiological evidence against the association of vitamin D status with various allergic diseases and atopy in Asian children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Community Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: New evidence shows high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in many countries and some studies suggest a possible link between vitamin D status and allergic diseases. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of suboptimal vitamin D status in a population sample of Asian children and to investigate the relationship of vitamin D status with allergic diseases and atopy.

Methods: Children aged 5-18 years (N = 1315) in the Prediction of Allergies in Taiwanese CHildren (PATCH) study were evaluated using questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and total and specific immunoglobulin E (IgE).

Results: The mean concentration of serum 25(OH)D was 20.4 ng/mL (SD: 7.1 ng/mL). Vitamin D deficiency (defined as serum 25(OH)D<20 ng/mL) was present in 670 subjects (51.0%), while vitamin D insufficiency (defined as serum 25(OH)D<30 ng/mL) was observed in 1187 subjects (90.3%). Older age (P<0.001), female gender (P<0.001), higher body mass index (P = 0.001), winter and spring seasons (compared to summer; P both<0.001), and passive smoking (P = 0.011) were independently associated with low serum 25(OH)D levels. After adjusting for potential confounders, serum 25(OH)D status had no association with asthma, rhinitis, eczema, atopy, or total serum IgE (all P>0.05).

Conclusions: Low serum 25(OH)D levels are remarkably common in this population sample of Asian children, suggesting that millions of children living in Taiwan may have suboptimal levels of vitamin D, which should be a matter of public health concern. Our results provides epidemiological evidence against the association of vitamin D status with various allergic diseases and atopy in Asian children.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus