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Art in time and space: context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing time.

Brieber D, Nadal M, Leder H, Rosenberg R - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Here we examined the effect of context on the relation between the experience of art and viewing time, the most basic indicator of viewing behavior.Analyses with mixed effects models revealed that aesthetic appreciation (compounding liking and interest), understanding, and ambiguity predicted viewing time for artworks and for their corresponding labels.Our results suggest that art museums foster an enduring and focused aesthetic experience and demonstrate that context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Vienna, Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods, Faculty of Psychology, Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT
The experience of art emerges from the interaction of various cognitive and affective processes. The unfolding of these processes in time and their relation with viewing behavior, however, is still poorly understood. Here we examined the effect of context on the relation between the experience of art and viewing time, the most basic indicator of viewing behavior. Two groups of participants viewed an art exhibition in one of two contexts: one in the museum, the other in the laboratory. In both cases viewing time was recorded with a mobile eye tracking system. After freely viewing the exhibition, participants rated each artwork on liking, interest, understanding, and ambiguity scales. Our results show that participants in the museum context liked artworks more, found them more interesting, and viewed them longer than those in the laboratory. Analyses with mixed effects models revealed that aesthetic appreciation (compounding liking and interest), understanding, and ambiguity predicted viewing time for artworks and for their corresponding labels. The effect of aesthetic appreciation and ambiguity on viewing time was modulated by context: Whereas art appreciation tended to predict viewing time better in the laboratory than in museum context, the relation between ambiguity and viewing time was positive in the museum and negative in the laboratory context. Our results suggest that art museums foster an enduring and focused aesthetic experience and demonstrate that context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing behavior.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between viewing time for labels and art appreciation by context.Relationship according to mixed effects model analysis between log(x+1) transformed viewing time for labels and art appreciation ratings. Lab  =  Laboratory. Slopes for the museum (solid) and laboratory (dashed) context are significantly different (p<.05).
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pone-0099019-g004: Relationship between viewing time for labels and art appreciation by context.Relationship according to mixed effects model analysis between log(x+1) transformed viewing time for labels and art appreciation ratings. Lab  =  Laboratory. Slopes for the museum (solid) and laboratory (dashed) context are significantly different (p<.05).

Mentions: In the final model, viewing time for artwork labels was predicted by appreciation, the number of words on the labels, and the order of artworks. The effect of all of these predictors, however, differed between contexts. In both contexts, people spent more time reading labels for artworks they appreciated more (museum: b = 0.089, SE = 0.043, t(533)  = 2.10, p = .036; laboratory: b = 0.288, SE = 0.037, t(533)  = 7.71, p<.001; Figure 4). Similarly to viewing time for artworks, this impact of appreciation on viewing time for labels was stronger in the laboratory than in the museum context (b = 0.199, SE = 0.054, t(533)  = 3.66, p<.001; for the interaction between appreciation and viewing time for labels with museum context as reference group). Other factors such as the number of words on the label (b = 0.005, SE = 0.002, t(533)  = 2.49, p = .024) or the order of artworks (b = −0.089, SE = 0.026, t(533)  = −3.39, p = .003) were only significant in the museum but not in the laboratory context (ps>.17).


Art in time and space: context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing time.

Brieber D, Nadal M, Leder H, Rosenberg R - PLoS ONE (2014)

Relationship between viewing time for labels and art appreciation by context.Relationship according to mixed effects model analysis between log(x+1) transformed viewing time for labels and art appreciation ratings. Lab  =  Laboratory. Slopes for the museum (solid) and laboratory (dashed) context are significantly different (p<.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4043844&req=5

pone-0099019-g004: Relationship between viewing time for labels and art appreciation by context.Relationship according to mixed effects model analysis between log(x+1) transformed viewing time for labels and art appreciation ratings. Lab  =  Laboratory. Slopes for the museum (solid) and laboratory (dashed) context are significantly different (p<.05).
Mentions: In the final model, viewing time for artwork labels was predicted by appreciation, the number of words on the labels, and the order of artworks. The effect of all of these predictors, however, differed between contexts. In both contexts, people spent more time reading labels for artworks they appreciated more (museum: b = 0.089, SE = 0.043, t(533)  = 2.10, p = .036; laboratory: b = 0.288, SE = 0.037, t(533)  = 7.71, p<.001; Figure 4). Similarly to viewing time for artworks, this impact of appreciation on viewing time for labels was stronger in the laboratory than in the museum context (b = 0.199, SE = 0.054, t(533)  = 3.66, p<.001; for the interaction between appreciation and viewing time for labels with museum context as reference group). Other factors such as the number of words on the label (b = 0.005, SE = 0.002, t(533)  = 2.49, p = .024) or the order of artworks (b = −0.089, SE = 0.026, t(533)  = −3.39, p = .003) were only significant in the museum but not in the laboratory context (ps>.17).

Bottom Line: Here we examined the effect of context on the relation between the experience of art and viewing time, the most basic indicator of viewing behavior.Analyses with mixed effects models revealed that aesthetic appreciation (compounding liking and interest), understanding, and ambiguity predicted viewing time for artworks and for their corresponding labels.Our results suggest that art museums foster an enduring and focused aesthetic experience and demonstrate that context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Vienna, Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods, Faculty of Psychology, Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT
The experience of art emerges from the interaction of various cognitive and affective processes. The unfolding of these processes in time and their relation with viewing behavior, however, is still poorly understood. Here we examined the effect of context on the relation between the experience of art and viewing time, the most basic indicator of viewing behavior. Two groups of participants viewed an art exhibition in one of two contexts: one in the museum, the other in the laboratory. In both cases viewing time was recorded with a mobile eye tracking system. After freely viewing the exhibition, participants rated each artwork on liking, interest, understanding, and ambiguity scales. Our results show that participants in the museum context liked artworks more, found them more interesting, and viewed them longer than those in the laboratory. Analyses with mixed effects models revealed that aesthetic appreciation (compounding liking and interest), understanding, and ambiguity predicted viewing time for artworks and for their corresponding labels. The effect of aesthetic appreciation and ambiguity on viewing time was modulated by context: Whereas art appreciation tended to predict viewing time better in the laboratory than in museum context, the relation between ambiguity and viewing time was positive in the museum and negative in the laboratory context. Our results suggest that art museums foster an enduring and focused aesthetic experience and demonstrate that context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing behavior.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus