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Two-dimensional estimates of left ventricular strains are significantly affected by through-plane motion

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Advanced measures of cardiac mechanics such as left ventricular (LV) strains can be used in conjunction with classical biomarkers to gauge cardiovascular health and improve prediction of patient outcomes... Short-axis slices with 2.8 mm in-plane resolution and an 8 mm slice thickness were acquired to span the entire LV... Displacements were encoded in both through-plane and in-plane directions with an effective temporal resolution of 34 ms... Endocardial and epicardial boundaries were delineated on the magnitude image of all short axis DENSE images... Radial and circumferential strains were computed based upon the deformation of the myocardium relative to the end-diastolic frame... The resulting radial and circumferential strain values were compared directly between the 2D and 3D analyses using a two-tailed paired t-test... Two dimensional processing consistently overestimated radial strain and underestimated circumferential strain... Peak radial strain decreased from the base to the apex in both 2D and 3D analyses; however, 2D significantly overestimated radial strain at the mid-ventricular and apical slices compared to 3D (p = 0.002)... Global peak radial and circumferential strains from 3D were 30 ± 5% and -20 ± 2%, respectively, compared to 36 ± 5% and -18 ± 2% for 2D (both p < 0.001)... This limitation of two-dimensional imaging is likely due to the through-plane motion of the heart, which is ignored in two-dimensional techniques but easily accounted for when using three-dimensional techniques... Future research needs to determine the clinical and prognostic significance of this difference.

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Average (n = 8) peak radial (top) and circumferential (bottom) left ventricular strains computed with (3D) and without (2D) accounting for through-plane motion. Bars indicate standard deviations. * denotes p < 0.05 for 3D vs 2D.
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Figure 1: Average (n = 8) peak radial (top) and circumferential (bottom) left ventricular strains computed with (3D) and without (2D) accounting for through-plane motion. Bars indicate standard deviations. * denotes p < 0.05 for 3D vs 2D.


Two-dimensional estimates of left ventricular strains are significantly affected by through-plane motion
Average (n = 8) peak radial (top) and circumferential (bottom) left ventricular strains computed with (3D) and without (2D) accounting for through-plane motion. Bars indicate standard deviations. * denotes p < 0.05 for 3D vs 2D.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4043838&req=5

Figure 1: Average (n = 8) peak radial (top) and circumferential (bottom) left ventricular strains computed with (3D) and without (2D) accounting for through-plane motion. Bars indicate standard deviations. * denotes p < 0.05 for 3D vs 2D.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Advanced measures of cardiac mechanics such as left ventricular (LV) strains can be used in conjunction with classical biomarkers to gauge cardiovascular health and improve prediction of patient outcomes... Short-axis slices with 2.8 mm in-plane resolution and an 8 mm slice thickness were acquired to span the entire LV... Displacements were encoded in both through-plane and in-plane directions with an effective temporal resolution of 34 ms... Endocardial and epicardial boundaries were delineated on the magnitude image of all short axis DENSE images... Radial and circumferential strains were computed based upon the deformation of the myocardium relative to the end-diastolic frame... The resulting radial and circumferential strain values were compared directly between the 2D and 3D analyses using a two-tailed paired t-test... Two dimensional processing consistently overestimated radial strain and underestimated circumferential strain... Peak radial strain decreased from the base to the apex in both 2D and 3D analyses; however, 2D significantly overestimated radial strain at the mid-ventricular and apical slices compared to 3D (p = 0.002)... Global peak radial and circumferential strains from 3D were 30 ± 5% and -20 ± 2%, respectively, compared to 36 ± 5% and -18 ± 2% for 2D (both p < 0.001)... This limitation of two-dimensional imaging is likely due to the through-plane motion of the heart, which is ignored in two-dimensional techniques but easily accounted for when using three-dimensional techniques... Future research needs to determine the clinical and prognostic significance of this difference.

No MeSH data available.