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Prevalence and relationship between major depressive disorder and lung cancer: a cross-sectional study.

Maneeton B, Maneeton N, Reungyos J, Intaprasert S, Leelarphat S, Thongprasert S - Onco Targets Ther (2014)

Bottom Line: Based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, 14.4% of them were defined as having MDD.In addition, fatigue, poor quality of life, and sleep disturbance may increase associated MDD.Because of the small sample size, further studies should be conducted to confirm these results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence and examine the factors associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) in lung cancer patients.

Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out in the oncology clinic of the University Hospital, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. Patients with all stages of lung cancer were included in this study. Demographic data of eligible patients were gathered. The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Thai version 5.0.0 was used to identify MDD. The Thai version of the Personal Health Questionnaire Depression Scale was used to assess depression severity.

Results: A total of 146 lung cancer patients from the outpatient clinic from July to December 2012 were approached. The 104 patients were included and analyzed in this study. Based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, 14.4% of them were defined as having MDD. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that Chalder Fatigue Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Lung, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores were significantly correlated with MDD in lung cancer patients.

Conclusion: The results suggest that MDD is more prevalent in lung cancer patients. In addition, fatigue, poor quality of life, and sleep disturbance may increase associated MDD. Because of the small sample size, further studies should be conducted to confirm these results.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of study enrollment and completion for lung cancer patients.
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f1-ott-7-815: Flow diagram of study enrollment and completion for lung cancer patients.

Mentions: This study was cross-sectional. All lung cancer patients followed up in the oncology clinic of University Hospital, Chiang Mai University, Thailand were assessed and screened for eligibility to enter the study (July 2012–December 2012). Patients with all stages of lung cancer, aged 18 years or more, receiving any treatment (including specific anticancer, symptomatic and/or supportive therapies), and verbally communicating were included in this study. In the case of uneducated patients, we collected the data by interviewing them, and also gathered those details from their relatives. However, patients who did not cooperate due to impairment of consciousness or severe psychiatric symptoms were excluded from the study. Additionally, patients with disorders of the central nervous system were excluded. Eligible patients were provided details about the assessment procedure (see Figure 1). This study was approved by the medical ethical committee of Chiang Mai University, and all subjects provided informed consent.


Prevalence and relationship between major depressive disorder and lung cancer: a cross-sectional study.

Maneeton B, Maneeton N, Reungyos J, Intaprasert S, Leelarphat S, Thongprasert S - Onco Targets Ther (2014)

Flow diagram of study enrollment and completion for lung cancer patients.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4043796&req=5

f1-ott-7-815: Flow diagram of study enrollment and completion for lung cancer patients.
Mentions: This study was cross-sectional. All lung cancer patients followed up in the oncology clinic of University Hospital, Chiang Mai University, Thailand were assessed and screened for eligibility to enter the study (July 2012–December 2012). Patients with all stages of lung cancer, aged 18 years or more, receiving any treatment (including specific anticancer, symptomatic and/or supportive therapies), and verbally communicating were included in this study. In the case of uneducated patients, we collected the data by interviewing them, and also gathered those details from their relatives. However, patients who did not cooperate due to impairment of consciousness or severe psychiatric symptoms were excluded from the study. Additionally, patients with disorders of the central nervous system were excluded. Eligible patients were provided details about the assessment procedure (see Figure 1). This study was approved by the medical ethical committee of Chiang Mai University, and all subjects provided informed consent.

Bottom Line: Based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, 14.4% of them were defined as having MDD.In addition, fatigue, poor quality of life, and sleep disturbance may increase associated MDD.Because of the small sample size, further studies should be conducted to confirm these results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence and examine the factors associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) in lung cancer patients.

Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out in the oncology clinic of the University Hospital, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. Patients with all stages of lung cancer were included in this study. Demographic data of eligible patients were gathered. The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Thai version 5.0.0 was used to identify MDD. The Thai version of the Personal Health Questionnaire Depression Scale was used to assess depression severity.

Results: A total of 146 lung cancer patients from the outpatient clinic from July to December 2012 were approached. The 104 patients were included and analyzed in this study. Based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, 14.4% of them were defined as having MDD. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that Chalder Fatigue Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Lung, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores were significantly correlated with MDD in lung cancer patients.

Conclusion: The results suggest that MDD is more prevalent in lung cancer patients. In addition, fatigue, poor quality of life, and sleep disturbance may increase associated MDD. Because of the small sample size, further studies should be conducted to confirm these results.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus