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Variation in seed germination of 134 common species on the eastern Tibetan Plateau: phylogenetic, life history and environmental correlates.

Xu J, Li W, Zhang C, Liu W, Du G - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: In this study, we examined the effects of phylogenetic, life history and environmental factors on seed germination of 134 common species from an alpine/subalpine meadow on the eastern Tibetan Plateau.Our results demonstrated that elevated temperature would lead to a significant increase in germination percentage and an accelerated germination.Therefore, germination variation are constrained mainly by phylogenetic inertia in a community, and seed germination variation correlated with phylogeny is also associated with life history attributes, suggesting a role of niche adaptation in the conservation of germination variation within lineages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Grassland and Agroecosystems, School of Life Science, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Seed germination is a crucial stage in the life history of a species because it represents the pathway from adult to offspring, and it can affect the distribution and abundance of species in communities. In this study, we examined the effects of phylogenetic, life history and environmental factors on seed germination of 134 common species from an alpine/subalpine meadow on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. In one-way ANOVAs, phylogenetic groups (at or above order) explained 13.0% and 25.9% of the variance in germination percentage and mean germination time, respectively; life history attributes, such as seed size, dispersal mode, explained 3.7%, 2.1% of the variance in germination percentage and 6.3%, 8.7% of the variance in mean germination time, respectively; the environmental factors temperature and habitat explained 4.7%, 1.0% of the variance in germination percentage and 13.5%, 1.7% of the variance in mean germination time, respectively. Our results demonstrated that elevated temperature would lead to a significant increase in germination percentage and an accelerated germination. Multi-factorial ANOVAs showed that the three major factors contributing to differences in germination percentage and mean germination time in this alpine/subalpine meadow were phylogenetic attributes, temperature and seed size (explained 10.5%, 4.7% and 1.4% of the variance in germination percentage independently, respectively; and explained 14.9%, 13.5% and 2.7% of the variance in mean germination time independently, respectively). In addition, there were strong associations between phylogenetic group and life history attributes, and between life history attributes and environmental factors. Therefore, germination variation are constrained mainly by phylogenetic inertia in a community, and seed germination variation correlated with phylogeny is also associated with life history attributes, suggesting a role of niche adaptation in the conservation of germination variation within lineages. Meanwhile, selection can maintain the association between germination behavior and the environmental conditions within a lineage.

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Effects of temperature treatments on seed mortality during germination.Bars (mean±SE) that do not share a letter represent significantly different values at P<0.05 level (Turkey multiple comparison test).
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pone-0098601-g004: Effects of temperature treatments on seed mortality during germination.Bars (mean±SE) that do not share a letter represent significantly different values at P<0.05 level (Turkey multiple comparison test).

Mentions: Generally, the earliest GT occurred in 10/20°C (10.15±0.47 days), and the highest GP occurred in 5/25°C (59.50±2.81%), whereas the most delayed (17.75±0.68 days) and the poorest germination (38.16±2.82%) occurred in 5/15°C (Figure 3). Tetrazolium tests revealed that most ungerminated seeds were still alive at the end of the experiments. The percentage of ungerminated but viable seeds was 51.32%, 32.43%, 26.33%, 24.46% and 22.63% at 5/15°C, 5/20°C, 5/25°C, 10/20°C and 10/25°C respectively, and the temperature treatments significantly affected the mortality of the seeds (Figure 4).


Variation in seed germination of 134 common species on the eastern Tibetan Plateau: phylogenetic, life history and environmental correlates.

Xu J, Li W, Zhang C, Liu W, Du G - PLoS ONE (2014)

Effects of temperature treatments on seed mortality during germination.Bars (mean±SE) that do not share a letter represent significantly different values at P<0.05 level (Turkey multiple comparison test).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4043731&req=5

pone-0098601-g004: Effects of temperature treatments on seed mortality during germination.Bars (mean±SE) that do not share a letter represent significantly different values at P<0.05 level (Turkey multiple comparison test).
Mentions: Generally, the earliest GT occurred in 10/20°C (10.15±0.47 days), and the highest GP occurred in 5/25°C (59.50±2.81%), whereas the most delayed (17.75±0.68 days) and the poorest germination (38.16±2.82%) occurred in 5/15°C (Figure 3). Tetrazolium tests revealed that most ungerminated seeds were still alive at the end of the experiments. The percentage of ungerminated but viable seeds was 51.32%, 32.43%, 26.33%, 24.46% and 22.63% at 5/15°C, 5/20°C, 5/25°C, 10/20°C and 10/25°C respectively, and the temperature treatments significantly affected the mortality of the seeds (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: In this study, we examined the effects of phylogenetic, life history and environmental factors on seed germination of 134 common species from an alpine/subalpine meadow on the eastern Tibetan Plateau.Our results demonstrated that elevated temperature would lead to a significant increase in germination percentage and an accelerated germination.Therefore, germination variation are constrained mainly by phylogenetic inertia in a community, and seed germination variation correlated with phylogeny is also associated with life history attributes, suggesting a role of niche adaptation in the conservation of germination variation within lineages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Grassland and Agroecosystems, School of Life Science, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Seed germination is a crucial stage in the life history of a species because it represents the pathway from adult to offspring, and it can affect the distribution and abundance of species in communities. In this study, we examined the effects of phylogenetic, life history and environmental factors on seed germination of 134 common species from an alpine/subalpine meadow on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. In one-way ANOVAs, phylogenetic groups (at or above order) explained 13.0% and 25.9% of the variance in germination percentage and mean germination time, respectively; life history attributes, such as seed size, dispersal mode, explained 3.7%, 2.1% of the variance in germination percentage and 6.3%, 8.7% of the variance in mean germination time, respectively; the environmental factors temperature and habitat explained 4.7%, 1.0% of the variance in germination percentage and 13.5%, 1.7% of the variance in mean germination time, respectively. Our results demonstrated that elevated temperature would lead to a significant increase in germination percentage and an accelerated germination. Multi-factorial ANOVAs showed that the three major factors contributing to differences in germination percentage and mean germination time in this alpine/subalpine meadow were phylogenetic attributes, temperature and seed size (explained 10.5%, 4.7% and 1.4% of the variance in germination percentage independently, respectively; and explained 14.9%, 13.5% and 2.7% of the variance in mean germination time independently, respectively). In addition, there were strong associations between phylogenetic group and life history attributes, and between life history attributes and environmental factors. Therefore, germination variation are constrained mainly by phylogenetic inertia in a community, and seed germination variation correlated with phylogeny is also associated with life history attributes, suggesting a role of niche adaptation in the conservation of germination variation within lineages. Meanwhile, selection can maintain the association between germination behavior and the environmental conditions within a lineage.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus