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Liposomes versus metallic nanostructures: differences in the process of knowledge translation in cancer.

Fajardo-Ortiz D, Duran L, Moreno L, Ochoa H, Castaño VM - Int J Nanomedicine (2014)

Bottom Line: In the case of liposomes, our results identify subnetworks (invisible colleges) associated with different therapeutic strategies: nanopharmacology, hyperthermia, and gene therapy.In the case of MNs, subnetworks are not differentiated by the type of therapeutic strategy, and the content of the documents is still basic research.Research on MNs is highly focused on developing a combination of molecular imaging and photothermal therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
This research maps the knowledge translation process for two different types of nanotechnologies applied to cancer: liposomes and metallic nanostructures (MNs). We performed a structural analysis of citation networks and text mining supported in controlled vocabularies. In the case of liposomes, our results identify subnetworks (invisible colleges) associated with different therapeutic strategies: nanopharmacology, hyperthermia, and gene therapy. Only in the pharmacological strategy was an organized knowledge translation process identified, which, however, is monopolized by the liposomal doxorubicins. In the case of MNs, subnetworks are not differentiated by the type of therapeutic strategy, and the content of the documents is still basic research. Research on MNs is highly focused on developing a combination of molecular imaging and photothermal therapy.

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Network model of research papers on cancer and liposomes.Notes: Each node represents one paper of the 20% most cited papers on liposome research applied to cancer, and the edges represent the citations between the documents (nodes). The shape of the nodes indicates to which subnetwork they belong (1–9). The color of the nodes is according to a continuous scale from red to blue. This scale is a function of the clinical terms rate, so a red node could be considered a basic research paper, a purple one clinical research, and a blue node is a clinical observation article. Nodes without text are papers that did not report any address.
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f1-ijn-9-2627: Network model of research papers on cancer and liposomes.Notes: Each node represents one paper of the 20% most cited papers on liposome research applied to cancer, and the edges represent the citations between the documents (nodes). The shape of the nodes indicates to which subnetwork they belong (1–9). The color of the nodes is according to a continuous scale from red to blue. This scale is a function of the clinical terms rate, so a red node could be considered a basic research paper, a purple one clinical research, and a blue node is a clinical observation article. Nodes without text are papers that did not report any address.

Mentions: One hundred and fifty-two of the selected articles form a single network of citations. By analyzing the network model using the Clust & See software, nine subnets were identified (Figure 1). The distribution of GO and MeSH terms identified for each subnet reveals that several of these correspond to different lines of research (Figure 1). Subnet 1 is related to the development of liposomes as vehicles for drugs in general; subnet 2 is related to the clinical use of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin; subnet 3 is related to basic research into doxorubicin liposomes; subnet 4 relates to clinical research of gene therapy; subnet 5 also relates to gene therapy but at the level of basic research; subnet 7 is associated with hyperthermia therapy; and subnet 9 is related to small RNA interference.


Liposomes versus metallic nanostructures: differences in the process of knowledge translation in cancer.

Fajardo-Ortiz D, Duran L, Moreno L, Ochoa H, Castaño VM - Int J Nanomedicine (2014)

Network model of research papers on cancer and liposomes.Notes: Each node represents one paper of the 20% most cited papers on liposome research applied to cancer, and the edges represent the citations between the documents (nodes). The shape of the nodes indicates to which subnetwork they belong (1–9). The color of the nodes is according to a continuous scale from red to blue. This scale is a function of the clinical terms rate, so a red node could be considered a basic research paper, a purple one clinical research, and a blue node is a clinical observation article. Nodes without text are papers that did not report any address.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4043705&req=5

f1-ijn-9-2627: Network model of research papers on cancer and liposomes.Notes: Each node represents one paper of the 20% most cited papers on liposome research applied to cancer, and the edges represent the citations between the documents (nodes). The shape of the nodes indicates to which subnetwork they belong (1–9). The color of the nodes is according to a continuous scale from red to blue. This scale is a function of the clinical terms rate, so a red node could be considered a basic research paper, a purple one clinical research, and a blue node is a clinical observation article. Nodes without text are papers that did not report any address.
Mentions: One hundred and fifty-two of the selected articles form a single network of citations. By analyzing the network model using the Clust & See software, nine subnets were identified (Figure 1). The distribution of GO and MeSH terms identified for each subnet reveals that several of these correspond to different lines of research (Figure 1). Subnet 1 is related to the development of liposomes as vehicles for drugs in general; subnet 2 is related to the clinical use of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin; subnet 3 is related to basic research into doxorubicin liposomes; subnet 4 relates to clinical research of gene therapy; subnet 5 also relates to gene therapy but at the level of basic research; subnet 7 is associated with hyperthermia therapy; and subnet 9 is related to small RNA interference.

Bottom Line: In the case of liposomes, our results identify subnetworks (invisible colleges) associated with different therapeutic strategies: nanopharmacology, hyperthermia, and gene therapy.In the case of MNs, subnetworks are not differentiated by the type of therapeutic strategy, and the content of the documents is still basic research.Research on MNs is highly focused on developing a combination of molecular imaging and photothermal therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
This research maps the knowledge translation process for two different types of nanotechnologies applied to cancer: liposomes and metallic nanostructures (MNs). We performed a structural analysis of citation networks and text mining supported in controlled vocabularies. In the case of liposomes, our results identify subnetworks (invisible colleges) associated with different therapeutic strategies: nanopharmacology, hyperthermia, and gene therapy. Only in the pharmacological strategy was an organized knowledge translation process identified, which, however, is monopolized by the liposomal doxorubicins. In the case of MNs, subnetworks are not differentiated by the type of therapeutic strategy, and the content of the documents is still basic research. Research on MNs is highly focused on developing a combination of molecular imaging and photothermal therapy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus