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Heart rate adaptive maximal resolution cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial stress perfusion imaging at 3.0T

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Myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with vasodilator stress has high diagnostic accuracy for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD)... Current CMR perfusion pulse sequences use largely fixed acquisition parameters designed to acquire at least three slices every heart beat, optimized for the heart rates that typically occur during pharmacological stress... In patients with lower heart rates there can be a significant amount of unused potential imaging time [Figure 1]... In those with higher heart rates, acquisition with fixed parameters may not be possible at every heart beat... We aimed to assess the feasibility of a perfusion pulse sequence which adapts to the heart rate, maximizing imaging time and acquired spatial resolution... Mean stress heart rate (HR) was 89 ± 11 in the fixed resolution group and 90 ± 18 in the adaptive resolution group... There was no statistical difference in the haemodynamic data between the two groups... In two cases the stress HR was too high for alternate R-R interval imaging with the fixed resolution sequence resulting in alternate heart beat imaging... The mean DRA width was 3.0 ± 0.6 mm (95% CI: 2.57-3.51) with the standard perfusion sequence and 2.1 ± 0.6 mm (95% CI: 1.65-2.57) with the adaptive sequence (p < 0.001)[Figure 2]... There was no statistical difference in median image quality score... Optimising the use of available imaging time during CMR myocardial perfusion imaging with heart rate adaptive shot acquisition duration is feasible and improves the acquired resolution and reduces dark rim artifact whilst maintaining image quality.

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Example perfusion first pass perfusion mid-slice images A: standard optimised fixed resolution protocol with acquired resolution of 2.42 × 2.42 mm 2 and B: adaptive resolution protocol maximising imaging time with acquired resolution of 1.74 × 1.74 mm 2 revealing less dark rim artefact.
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Figure 2: Example perfusion first pass perfusion mid-slice images A: standard optimised fixed resolution protocol with acquired resolution of 2.42 × 2.42 mm 2 and B: adaptive resolution protocol maximising imaging time with acquired resolution of 1.74 × 1.74 mm 2 revealing less dark rim artefact.

Mentions: Adaptive perfusion CMR was feasible in all subjects. Mean stress heart rate (HR) was 89 ± 11 in the fixed resolution group and 90 ± 18 in the adaptive resolution group. There was no statistical difference in the haemodynamic data between the two groups. The standard perfusion sequence acquired in-plane resolution was 2.42 × 2.42 mm and the mean HR adaptive sequence resolution was 1.91 × 1.91 mm ± 0.41 (range 1.53-2.89)(p = 0.001). In two cases the stress HR was too high for alternate R-R interval imaging with the fixed resolution sequence resulting in alternate heart beat imaging. This did not occur with the adaptive sequence which adjusted the resolution was adapted (to 2.84 × 2.84 and 2.89 × 2.89 mm respectively). The mean DRA width was 3.0 ± 0.6 mm (95% CI: 2.57-3.51) with the standard perfusion sequence and 2.1 ± 0.6 mm (95% CI: 1.65-2.57) with the adaptive sequence (p < 0.001)[Figure 2]. There was no statistical difference in median image quality score.


Heart rate adaptive maximal resolution cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial stress perfusion imaging at 3.0T
Example perfusion first pass perfusion mid-slice images A: standard optimised fixed resolution protocol with acquired resolution of 2.42 × 2.42 mm 2 and B: adaptive resolution protocol maximising imaging time with acquired resolution of 1.74 × 1.74 mm 2 revealing less dark rim artefact.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4043194&req=5

Figure 2: Example perfusion first pass perfusion mid-slice images A: standard optimised fixed resolution protocol with acquired resolution of 2.42 × 2.42 mm 2 and B: adaptive resolution protocol maximising imaging time with acquired resolution of 1.74 × 1.74 mm 2 revealing less dark rim artefact.
Mentions: Adaptive perfusion CMR was feasible in all subjects. Mean stress heart rate (HR) was 89 ± 11 in the fixed resolution group and 90 ± 18 in the adaptive resolution group. There was no statistical difference in the haemodynamic data between the two groups. The standard perfusion sequence acquired in-plane resolution was 2.42 × 2.42 mm and the mean HR adaptive sequence resolution was 1.91 × 1.91 mm ± 0.41 (range 1.53-2.89)(p = 0.001). In two cases the stress HR was too high for alternate R-R interval imaging with the fixed resolution sequence resulting in alternate heart beat imaging. This did not occur with the adaptive sequence which adjusted the resolution was adapted (to 2.84 × 2.84 and 2.89 × 2.89 mm respectively). The mean DRA width was 3.0 ± 0.6 mm (95% CI: 2.57-3.51) with the standard perfusion sequence and 2.1 ± 0.6 mm (95% CI: 1.65-2.57) with the adaptive sequence (p < 0.001)[Figure 2]. There was no statistical difference in median image quality score.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with vasodilator stress has high diagnostic accuracy for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD)... Current CMR perfusion pulse sequences use largely fixed acquisition parameters designed to acquire at least three slices every heart beat, optimized for the heart rates that typically occur during pharmacological stress... In patients with lower heart rates there can be a significant amount of unused potential imaging time [Figure 1]... In those with higher heart rates, acquisition with fixed parameters may not be possible at every heart beat... We aimed to assess the feasibility of a perfusion pulse sequence which adapts to the heart rate, maximizing imaging time and acquired spatial resolution... Mean stress heart rate (HR) was 89 ± 11 in the fixed resolution group and 90 ± 18 in the adaptive resolution group... There was no statistical difference in the haemodynamic data between the two groups... In two cases the stress HR was too high for alternate R-R interval imaging with the fixed resolution sequence resulting in alternate heart beat imaging... The mean DRA width was 3.0 ± 0.6 mm (95% CI: 2.57-3.51) with the standard perfusion sequence and 2.1 ± 0.6 mm (95% CI: 1.65-2.57) with the adaptive sequence (p < 0.001)[Figure 2]... There was no statistical difference in median image quality score... Optimising the use of available imaging time during CMR myocardial perfusion imaging with heart rate adaptive shot acquisition duration is feasible and improves the acquired resolution and reduces dark rim artifact whilst maintaining image quality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus