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Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style.

Ticini LF, Rachman L, Pelletier J, Dubal S - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: To what extent is art appreciation divorced from that activity and to what extent is it linked to it?That is the question which we set out to answer.We show that action priming, when congruent with the artist's painting style, enhanced aesthetic preference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière, ICM, Social and Affective Neuroscience (SAN) Laboratory Paris, France ; Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR S 1127 Paris, France ; Inserm, U 1127 Paris, France ; CNRS, UMR 7225 Paris, France ; Institut Jean Nicod, CNRS-EHESS-ENS UMR 8129 Paris, France ; The Italian Society for Neuroaesthetics 'Semir Zeki' Trieste, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The creation of an artwork requires motor activity. To what extent is art appreciation divorced from that activity and to what extent is it linked to it? That is the question which we set out to answer. We presented participants with pointillist-style paintings featuring discernible brushstrokes and asked them to rate their liking of each canvas when it was preceded by images priming a motor act either compatible or incompatible with the simulation of the artist's movements. We show that action priming, when congruent with the artist's painting style, enhanced aesthetic preference. These results support the hypothesis that involuntary covert painting simulation contributes to aesthetic appreciation during passive observation of artwork.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Images of a gloved-hand holding a paintbrush were used as supraliminal priming before the display of each pointillist-style painting. The images consisted of either a precision or a power grip, or of a rested palm down hand and they created three conditions. Compatible (precision grip) or Incompatible (power grip) with the drawing of pointillist-style paintings. The palm down image served as Control. (B) The preference expressed when the paintings were preceded by priming images activating motor programs Compatible with the production of pointillist-style brushstrokes was higher than that expressed for the Incompatible (*p < 0.05) and the Control (marginally significant §p = 0.067) conditions. The liking ratings in the Incompatible and Control conditions did not differ from each other (p = 0.567). Mean liking ratings in the three conditions are depicted (error bars represent s.e.m.).
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Figure 2: (A) Images of a gloved-hand holding a paintbrush were used as supraliminal priming before the display of each pointillist-style painting. The images consisted of either a precision or a power grip, or of a rested palm down hand and they created three conditions. Compatible (precision grip) or Incompatible (power grip) with the drawing of pointillist-style paintings. The palm down image served as Control. (B) The preference expressed when the paintings were preceded by priming images activating motor programs Compatible with the production of pointillist-style brushstrokes was higher than that expressed for the Incompatible (*p < 0.05) and the Control (marginally significant §p = 0.067) conditions. The liking ratings in the Incompatible and Control conditions did not differ from each other (p = 0.567). Mean liking ratings in the three conditions are depicted (error bars represent s.e.m.).

Mentions: After the visuomotor training, participants observed the 90 pointillist-style paintings preceded by one of the three images (700–1000 ms, randomly presented) depicting a right gloved-hand holding a paintbrush with a grip that supraliminally primed actions (for studies investigating how hand images prime actions see Borghi et al., 2007) that were either Compatible (precision grip) or Incompatible (power grip) with the drawing of pointillist-style paintings (Figure 2A). A palm down image served as Control. Each painting was presented three times, in nine randomized blocks (of 30 trials each) preceded by a different priming image. After 500 ms, the participants rated the paintings by moving a dot along a 9-point Likert-type scale displayed below the painting for 2500 ms (from “I like it very much” to “I do not like it at all,” direction counterbalanced across subjects) by left ring and index finger key-presses. Choices were confirmed by middle finger key-presses. A 1000 ms blank screen completed each trial. Due to the numerous unconfirmed ratings (≥10%) two participants were excluded from further analysis. In the remaining 18, a total of 3.25% of unconfirmed ratings was excluded.


Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style.

Ticini LF, Rachman L, Pelletier J, Dubal S - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

(A) Images of a gloved-hand holding a paintbrush were used as supraliminal priming before the display of each pointillist-style painting. The images consisted of either a precision or a power grip, or of a rested palm down hand and they created three conditions. Compatible (precision grip) or Incompatible (power grip) with the drawing of pointillist-style paintings. The palm down image served as Control. (B) The preference expressed when the paintings were preceded by priming images activating motor programs Compatible with the production of pointillist-style brushstrokes was higher than that expressed for the Incompatible (*p < 0.05) and the Control (marginally significant §p = 0.067) conditions. The liking ratings in the Incompatible and Control conditions did not differ from each other (p = 0.567). Mean liking ratings in the three conditions are depicted (error bars represent s.e.m.).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4043134&req=5

Figure 2: (A) Images of a gloved-hand holding a paintbrush were used as supraliminal priming before the display of each pointillist-style painting. The images consisted of either a precision or a power grip, or of a rested palm down hand and they created three conditions. Compatible (precision grip) or Incompatible (power grip) with the drawing of pointillist-style paintings. The palm down image served as Control. (B) The preference expressed when the paintings were preceded by priming images activating motor programs Compatible with the production of pointillist-style brushstrokes was higher than that expressed for the Incompatible (*p < 0.05) and the Control (marginally significant §p = 0.067) conditions. The liking ratings in the Incompatible and Control conditions did not differ from each other (p = 0.567). Mean liking ratings in the three conditions are depicted (error bars represent s.e.m.).
Mentions: After the visuomotor training, participants observed the 90 pointillist-style paintings preceded by one of the three images (700–1000 ms, randomly presented) depicting a right gloved-hand holding a paintbrush with a grip that supraliminally primed actions (for studies investigating how hand images prime actions see Borghi et al., 2007) that were either Compatible (precision grip) or Incompatible (power grip) with the drawing of pointillist-style paintings (Figure 2A). A palm down image served as Control. Each painting was presented three times, in nine randomized blocks (of 30 trials each) preceded by a different priming image. After 500 ms, the participants rated the paintings by moving a dot along a 9-point Likert-type scale displayed below the painting for 2500 ms (from “I like it very much” to “I do not like it at all,” direction counterbalanced across subjects) by left ring and index finger key-presses. Choices were confirmed by middle finger key-presses. A 1000 ms blank screen completed each trial. Due to the numerous unconfirmed ratings (≥10%) two participants were excluded from further analysis. In the remaining 18, a total of 3.25% of unconfirmed ratings was excluded.

Bottom Line: To what extent is art appreciation divorced from that activity and to what extent is it linked to it?That is the question which we set out to answer.We show that action priming, when congruent with the artist's painting style, enhanced aesthetic preference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière, ICM, Social and Affective Neuroscience (SAN) Laboratory Paris, France ; Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR S 1127 Paris, France ; Inserm, U 1127 Paris, France ; CNRS, UMR 7225 Paris, France ; Institut Jean Nicod, CNRS-EHESS-ENS UMR 8129 Paris, France ; The Italian Society for Neuroaesthetics 'Semir Zeki' Trieste, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The creation of an artwork requires motor activity. To what extent is art appreciation divorced from that activity and to what extent is it linked to it? That is the question which we set out to answer. We presented participants with pointillist-style paintings featuring discernible brushstrokes and asked them to rate their liking of each canvas when it was preceded by images priming a motor act either compatible or incompatible with the simulation of the artist's movements. We show that action priming, when congruent with the artist's painting style, enhanced aesthetic preference. These results support the hypothesis that involuntary covert painting simulation contributes to aesthetic appreciation during passive observation of artwork.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus