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Induction of plasticity in the human motor cortex by pairing an auditory stimulus with TMS.

Sowman PF, Dueholm SS, Rasmussen JH, Mrachacz-Kersting N - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Acoustic stimuli can cause a transient increase in the excitability of the motor cortex.We demonstrate that appropriately timed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the hand area, paired with auditorily mediated excitation of the motor cortex, induces an enhancement of motor cortex excitability that lasts beyond the time of stimulation.This result demonstrates for the first time that paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity within the motor cortex is applicable with auditory stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University Sydney, NSW, Australia ; Perception and Action Research Centre (PARC), Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University Sydney, NSW, Australia ; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD), Macquarie University Sydney, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Acoustic stimuli can cause a transient increase in the excitability of the motor cortex. The current study leverages this phenomenon to develop a method for testing the integrity of auditorimotor integration and the capacity for auditorimotor plasticity. We demonstrate that appropriately timed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the hand area, paired with auditorily mediated excitation of the motor cortex, induces an enhancement of motor cortex excitability that lasts beyond the time of stimulation. This result demonstrates for the first time that paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity within the motor cortex is applicable with auditory stimuli. We propose that the method developed here might provide a useful tool for future studies that measure auditory-motor connectivity in communication disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Normalized averaged MEP amplitudes (+SEM) at different times relative to the conditioning auditory stimulus. (A) MEP amplitudes for the condition “noise” for all ISIs (n = 12). (B) MEP amplitudes for the condition “speech sound”. Baseline is represented by the red horizontal line. * denotes average amplitude significantly different from baseline (p < 0.05).
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Figure 2: Normalized averaged MEP amplitudes (+SEM) at different times relative to the conditioning auditory stimulus. (A) MEP amplitudes for the condition “noise” for all ISIs (n = 12). (B) MEP amplitudes for the condition “speech sound”. Baseline is represented by the red horizontal line. * denotes average amplitude significantly different from baseline (p < 0.05).

Mentions: Results from Experiment A are shown in Figure 2. A repeated measures ANOVA showed that there was a significant effect of delay on the size of the MEP F(6,66) = 2.3, p = 0.045. There was no significant effect of condition nor significant interaction between delay and condition. Within condition comparison of mean normalized MEPs to baseline by means of a two-tailed one-sample t-test revealed that in the noise condition, MEPs were significantly increased above baseline for one ISI: 100 ms (115.5 ± 5.2% of baseline, t(11) = 3.0, p = 0.012). For the speech sound condition two ISIs had MEPs that were significantly increased above baseline: ISI = 100 ms (117.0 ± 6.5% of baseline, t(11) = 2.6, p = 0.023) and ISI = 150 ms (111.4 ± 4.7% of baseline, t(11) = 2.4, p = 0.035).


Induction of plasticity in the human motor cortex by pairing an auditory stimulus with TMS.

Sowman PF, Dueholm SS, Rasmussen JH, Mrachacz-Kersting N - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Normalized averaged MEP amplitudes (+SEM) at different times relative to the conditioning auditory stimulus. (A) MEP amplitudes for the condition “noise” for all ISIs (n = 12). (B) MEP amplitudes for the condition “speech sound”. Baseline is represented by the red horizontal line. * denotes average amplitude significantly different from baseline (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042887&req=5

Figure 2: Normalized averaged MEP amplitudes (+SEM) at different times relative to the conditioning auditory stimulus. (A) MEP amplitudes for the condition “noise” for all ISIs (n = 12). (B) MEP amplitudes for the condition “speech sound”. Baseline is represented by the red horizontal line. * denotes average amplitude significantly different from baseline (p < 0.05).
Mentions: Results from Experiment A are shown in Figure 2. A repeated measures ANOVA showed that there was a significant effect of delay on the size of the MEP F(6,66) = 2.3, p = 0.045. There was no significant effect of condition nor significant interaction between delay and condition. Within condition comparison of mean normalized MEPs to baseline by means of a two-tailed one-sample t-test revealed that in the noise condition, MEPs were significantly increased above baseline for one ISI: 100 ms (115.5 ± 5.2% of baseline, t(11) = 3.0, p = 0.012). For the speech sound condition two ISIs had MEPs that were significantly increased above baseline: ISI = 100 ms (117.0 ± 6.5% of baseline, t(11) = 2.6, p = 0.023) and ISI = 150 ms (111.4 ± 4.7% of baseline, t(11) = 2.4, p = 0.035).

Bottom Line: Acoustic stimuli can cause a transient increase in the excitability of the motor cortex.We demonstrate that appropriately timed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the hand area, paired with auditorily mediated excitation of the motor cortex, induces an enhancement of motor cortex excitability that lasts beyond the time of stimulation.This result demonstrates for the first time that paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity within the motor cortex is applicable with auditory stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University Sydney, NSW, Australia ; Perception and Action Research Centre (PARC), Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University Sydney, NSW, Australia ; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD), Macquarie University Sydney, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Acoustic stimuli can cause a transient increase in the excitability of the motor cortex. The current study leverages this phenomenon to develop a method for testing the integrity of auditorimotor integration and the capacity for auditorimotor plasticity. We demonstrate that appropriately timed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the hand area, paired with auditorily mediated excitation of the motor cortex, induces an enhancement of motor cortex excitability that lasts beyond the time of stimulation. This result demonstrates for the first time that paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity within the motor cortex is applicable with auditory stimuli. We propose that the method developed here might provide a useful tool for future studies that measure auditory-motor connectivity in communication disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus