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AnthWest, occurrence records for wool carder bees of the genus Anthidium (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae, Anthidiini) in the Western Hemisphere.

Griswold T, Gonzalez VH, Ikerd H - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: For a small portion of the database records, bees associated with threatened or endangered plants (~ 0.08% of total records) as well as specimens collected as part of unpublished biological inventories (~17%), georeferencing is presented only to nearest degree and the information on floral host, locality, elevation, month, and day has been withheld.This database can potentially be used in species distribution and niche modeling studies, as well as in assessments of pollinator status and pollination services.For native pollinators, this large dataset of occurrence records is the first to be simultaneously developed during a species-level systematic study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS. Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-5310, USA.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes AnthWest, a large dataset that represents one of the outcomes of a comprehensive, broadly comparative study on the diversity, biology, biogeography, and evolution of Anthidium Fabricius in the Western Hemisphere. In this dataset a total of 22,648 adult occurrence records comprising 9657 unique events are documented for 92 species of Anthidium, including the invasive range of two introduced species from Eurasia, A. oblongatum (Illiger) and A. manicatum (Linnaeus). The geospatial coverage of the dataset extends from northern Canada and Alaska to southern Argentina, and from below sea level in Death Valley, California, USA, to 4700 m a.s.l. in Tucumán, Argentina. The majority of records in the dataset correspond to information recorded from individual specimens examined by the authors during this project and deposited in 60 biodiversity collections located in Africa, Europe, North and South America. A fraction (4.8%) of the occurrence records were taken from the literature, largely California records from a taxonomic treatment with some additional records for the two introduced species. The temporal scale of the dataset represents collection events recorded between 1886 and 2012. The dataset was developed employing SQL server 2008 r2. For each specimen, the following information is generally provided: scientific name including identification qualifier when species status is uncertain (e.g. "Questionable Determination" for 0.4% of the specimens), sex, temporal and geospatial details, coordinates, data collector, host plants, associated organisms, name of identifier, historic identification, historic identifier, taxonomic value (i.e., type specimen, voucher, etc.), and repository. For a small portion of the database records, bees associated with threatened or endangered plants (~ 0.08% of total records) as well as specimens collected as part of unpublished biological inventories (~17%), georeferencing is presented only to nearest degree and the information on floral host, locality, elevation, month, and day has been withheld. This database can potentially be used in species distribution and niche modeling studies, as well as in assessments of pollinator status and pollination services. For native pollinators, this large dataset of occurrence records is the first to be simultaneously developed during a species-level systematic study.

No MeSH data available.


Location of 60 insect collections with number of specimens of Anthidium examined.
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Figure 3: Location of 60 insect collections with number of specimens of Anthidium examined.

Mentions: Design description: The purpose of this dataset is to make available data associated with bees of the genus Anthidium in the Western Hemisphere. The dataset was developed during the course of a species-level revision of the genus (Gonzalez and Griswold 2013). Most records come from specimens deposited in the first author’s host institution or acquired on loan from multiple bee depositories, primarily in North America, but some from South American and European institutions (Fig. 3). Permitting issues limited access to some South American institutions. All such specimens were identified by V.H. Gonzalez and/or T. Griswold. Additional California records from Grigarick and Stange (1968) were captured for all species whose taxonomic concept was not modified in Gonzalez and Griswold (2013). Subsequent to identification, individual specimens were processed by a team of assistants at the USDA-ARS Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory (BBSL). Individual specimens were entered into the US National Pollinating Insects Database (USNPID) using data entry forms where each specimen received a unique identifier (see below). These forms used authority files for bees, locations, collectors and plants. Where locations were not already georeferenced in the database they were georeferenced using Google Earthtm (http://earth.google.com/) or GEOlocate (http://www.museum.tulane.edu/geolocate/). Georeferencing used the form of decimal latitude and longitude in the WGS84 datum. Where georeferencing in the form of UTMs; township, range and section; or degree-minute-seconds was present on the specimen label, these were transformed, but the original label georeferencing was captured in the location authority files. Records were analyzed geospatially using ArcGIS and WWF Biotic Regions. Twenty-two records (<0.1%) were excluded from biotic regions analysis due to questionable identification and/or label data.


AnthWest, occurrence records for wool carder bees of the genus Anthidium (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae, Anthidiini) in the Western Hemisphere.

Griswold T, Gonzalez VH, Ikerd H - Zookeys (2014)

Location of 60 insect collections with number of specimens of Anthidium examined.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042824&req=5

Figure 3: Location of 60 insect collections with number of specimens of Anthidium examined.
Mentions: Design description: The purpose of this dataset is to make available data associated with bees of the genus Anthidium in the Western Hemisphere. The dataset was developed during the course of a species-level revision of the genus (Gonzalez and Griswold 2013). Most records come from specimens deposited in the first author’s host institution or acquired on loan from multiple bee depositories, primarily in North America, but some from South American and European institutions (Fig. 3). Permitting issues limited access to some South American institutions. All such specimens were identified by V.H. Gonzalez and/or T. Griswold. Additional California records from Grigarick and Stange (1968) were captured for all species whose taxonomic concept was not modified in Gonzalez and Griswold (2013). Subsequent to identification, individual specimens were processed by a team of assistants at the USDA-ARS Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory (BBSL). Individual specimens were entered into the US National Pollinating Insects Database (USNPID) using data entry forms where each specimen received a unique identifier (see below). These forms used authority files for bees, locations, collectors and plants. Where locations were not already georeferenced in the database they were georeferenced using Google Earthtm (http://earth.google.com/) or GEOlocate (http://www.museum.tulane.edu/geolocate/). Georeferencing used the form of decimal latitude and longitude in the WGS84 datum. Where georeferencing in the form of UTMs; township, range and section; or degree-minute-seconds was present on the specimen label, these were transformed, but the original label georeferencing was captured in the location authority files. Records were analyzed geospatially using ArcGIS and WWF Biotic Regions. Twenty-two records (<0.1%) were excluded from biotic regions analysis due to questionable identification and/or label data.

Bottom Line: For a small portion of the database records, bees associated with threatened or endangered plants (~ 0.08% of total records) as well as specimens collected as part of unpublished biological inventories (~17%), georeferencing is presented only to nearest degree and the information on floral host, locality, elevation, month, and day has been withheld.This database can potentially be used in species distribution and niche modeling studies, as well as in assessments of pollinator status and pollination services.For native pollinators, this large dataset of occurrence records is the first to be simultaneously developed during a species-level systematic study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS. Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-5310, USA.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes AnthWest, a large dataset that represents one of the outcomes of a comprehensive, broadly comparative study on the diversity, biology, biogeography, and evolution of Anthidium Fabricius in the Western Hemisphere. In this dataset a total of 22,648 adult occurrence records comprising 9657 unique events are documented for 92 species of Anthidium, including the invasive range of two introduced species from Eurasia, A. oblongatum (Illiger) and A. manicatum (Linnaeus). The geospatial coverage of the dataset extends from northern Canada and Alaska to southern Argentina, and from below sea level in Death Valley, California, USA, to 4700 m a.s.l. in Tucumán, Argentina. The majority of records in the dataset correspond to information recorded from individual specimens examined by the authors during this project and deposited in 60 biodiversity collections located in Africa, Europe, North and South America. A fraction (4.8%) of the occurrence records were taken from the literature, largely California records from a taxonomic treatment with some additional records for the two introduced species. The temporal scale of the dataset represents collection events recorded between 1886 and 2012. The dataset was developed employing SQL server 2008 r2. For each specimen, the following information is generally provided: scientific name including identification qualifier when species status is uncertain (e.g. "Questionable Determination" for 0.4% of the specimens), sex, temporal and geospatial details, coordinates, data collector, host plants, associated organisms, name of identifier, historic identification, historic identifier, taxonomic value (i.e., type specimen, voucher, etc.), and repository. For a small portion of the database records, bees associated with threatened or endangered plants (~ 0.08% of total records) as well as specimens collected as part of unpublished biological inventories (~17%), georeferencing is presented only to nearest degree and the information on floral host, locality, elevation, month, and day has been withheld. This database can potentially be used in species distribution and niche modeling studies, as well as in assessments of pollinator status and pollination services. For native pollinators, this large dataset of occurrence records is the first to be simultaneously developed during a species-level systematic study.

No MeSH data available.