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A new species of Alopoglossus lizard (Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae) from the tropical Andes, with a molecular phylogeny of the genus.

Torres-Carvajal O, Lobos SE - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: Cis-Andean [east of the Andes] and Trans-Andean [west of the Andes] species are nested in two separate clades, suggesting that the uplift of these mountains had an important effect in the diversification of Alopoglossus.In addition, we present an updated key to the species of Alopoglossus.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Escuela de Biología, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Avenida 12 de Octubre y Roca, Apartado 17-01-2184, Quito, Ecuador.

ABSTRACT
We describe a new species of Alopoglossus from the Pacific slopes of the Andes in northern Ecuador based on morphological and molecular evidence. The new species differs most significantly from all other congeners in having a double longitudinal row of widened gular scales, lanceolate dorsal scales in transverse rows, 29-32 dorsal scales in a transverse row at midbody, and 4 longitudinal rows of ventrals at midbody. It is most similar in morphology to A. festae, the only species of Alopoglossus currently recognized in western Ecuador. We analyze the phylogenetic relationships among species of Alopoglossus based on the mitochondrial gene ND4. Cis-Andean [east of the Andes] and Trans-Andean [west of the Andes] species are nested in two separate clades, suggesting that the uplift of these mountains had an important effect in the diversification of Alopoglossus. In addition, we present an updated key to the species of Alopoglossus.

No MeSH data available.


Distribution of Alopoglossus viridiceps sp. n. (triangles) and its sister species Alopoglossus festae (circles) in Ecuador. Locality data for Alopoglossus festae was taken both from the literature (blue circles; Almendáriz and Carr 2012; Köhler et al. 2012) and museum specimens (green circles; see Appendix).
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Figure 4: Distribution of Alopoglossus viridiceps sp. n. (triangles) and its sister species Alopoglossus festae (circles) in Ecuador. Locality data for Alopoglossus festae was taken both from the literature (blue circles; Almendáriz and Carr 2012; Köhler et al. 2012) and museum specimens (green circles; see Appendix).

Mentions: Alopoglossus viridiceps sp. n. inhabits cloud forests on the Pacific slopes of the Andes in northwestern Ecuador (Fig. 4). It occurs at elevations of 1246–1911 m in the province of Pichincha. Most type specimens were collected at Santa Lucía Cloud Forest Reserve, which extends between 1400–2560 m and has an area of 756 ha; annual precipitation ranges from 1500 to 2800 mm, and average annual temperature is recorded at 16 °C (Rivas-Martínez and Navarro 1995). Specimens of Alopoglossus viridiceps sp. n. were found active between 9h30–11h30 on leaf litter in primary forest, or on the border of sugar cane plantations. Other species of small ground lizards collected in the same area include the sphaerodactylid gecko Lepidoblepharis conolepis, the gymnophthalmids Cercosaura vertebralis and Echinosaura brachycephala, as well as an undescribed species of the gymnophthalmid genus Riama.


A new species of Alopoglossus lizard (Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae) from the tropical Andes, with a molecular phylogeny of the genus.

Torres-Carvajal O, Lobos SE - Zookeys (2014)

Distribution of Alopoglossus viridiceps sp. n. (triangles) and its sister species Alopoglossus festae (circles) in Ecuador. Locality data for Alopoglossus festae was taken both from the literature (blue circles; Almendáriz and Carr 2012; Köhler et al. 2012) and museum specimens (green circles; see Appendix).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042710&req=5

Figure 4: Distribution of Alopoglossus viridiceps sp. n. (triangles) and its sister species Alopoglossus festae (circles) in Ecuador. Locality data for Alopoglossus festae was taken both from the literature (blue circles; Almendáriz and Carr 2012; Köhler et al. 2012) and museum specimens (green circles; see Appendix).
Mentions: Alopoglossus viridiceps sp. n. inhabits cloud forests on the Pacific slopes of the Andes in northwestern Ecuador (Fig. 4). It occurs at elevations of 1246–1911 m in the province of Pichincha. Most type specimens were collected at Santa Lucía Cloud Forest Reserve, which extends between 1400–2560 m and has an area of 756 ha; annual precipitation ranges from 1500 to 2800 mm, and average annual temperature is recorded at 16 °C (Rivas-Martínez and Navarro 1995). Specimens of Alopoglossus viridiceps sp. n. were found active between 9h30–11h30 on leaf litter in primary forest, or on the border of sugar cane plantations. Other species of small ground lizards collected in the same area include the sphaerodactylid gecko Lepidoblepharis conolepis, the gymnophthalmids Cercosaura vertebralis and Echinosaura brachycephala, as well as an undescribed species of the gymnophthalmid genus Riama.

Bottom Line: Cis-Andean [east of the Andes] and Trans-Andean [west of the Andes] species are nested in two separate clades, suggesting that the uplift of these mountains had an important effect in the diversification of Alopoglossus.In addition, we present an updated key to the species of Alopoglossus.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Escuela de Biología, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Avenida 12 de Octubre y Roca, Apartado 17-01-2184, Quito, Ecuador.

ABSTRACT
We describe a new species of Alopoglossus from the Pacific slopes of the Andes in northern Ecuador based on morphological and molecular evidence. The new species differs most significantly from all other congeners in having a double longitudinal row of widened gular scales, lanceolate dorsal scales in transverse rows, 29-32 dorsal scales in a transverse row at midbody, and 4 longitudinal rows of ventrals at midbody. It is most similar in morphology to A. festae, the only species of Alopoglossus currently recognized in western Ecuador. We analyze the phylogenetic relationships among species of Alopoglossus based on the mitochondrial gene ND4. Cis-Andean [east of the Andes] and Trans-Andean [west of the Andes] species are nested in two separate clades, suggesting that the uplift of these mountains had an important effect in the diversification of Alopoglossus. In addition, we present an updated key to the species of Alopoglossus.

No MeSH data available.