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Birds of Antioquia: Georeferenced database of specimens from the Colección de Ciencias Naturales del Museo Universitario de la Universidad de Antioquia (MUA).

Rozo AM, Valencia F, Acosta A, Parra JL - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: We curated all the information associated with the bird specimens, including the georeferences and taxonomy, and published the database through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility network.The collection holds specimens from three endemic and endangered species (Coeligena orina, Diglossa gloriossisima, and Hypopirrhus pyrohipogaster), and includes localities poorly represented in other collections.The information contained in the collection has been used for biodiversity modeling, conservation planning and management, and we expect to further facilitate these activities by making it publicly available.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Biología, Grupo de Ecología y Evolución de Vertebrados, Universidad de Antioquia, calle 67 No 53-108, Medellín, Colombia.

ABSTRACT
The department of Antioquia, Colombia, lies in the northwestern corner of South America and provides a biogeographical link among divergent faunas, including Caribbean, Andean, Pacific and Amazonian. Information about the distribution of biodiversity in this area is of relevance for academic, practical and social purposes. This data paper describes the dataset containing all bird specimens deposited in the Colección de Ciencias Naturales del Museo Universitario de la Universidad de Antioquia (MUA). We curated all the information associated with the bird specimens, including the georeferences and taxonomy, and published the database through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility network. During this process we checked the species identification and existing georeferences and completed the information when possible. The collection holds 663 bird specimens collected between 1940 and 2011. Even though most specimens are from Antioquia (70%), the collection includes material from several other departments and one specimen from the United States. The collection holds specimens from three endemic and endangered species (Coeligena orina, Diglossa gloriossisima, and Hypopirrhus pyrohipogaster), and includes localities poorly represented in other collections. The information contained in the collection has been used for biodiversity modeling, conservation planning and management, and we expect to further facilitate these activities by making it publicly available.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic flowchart of the steps taken to format the collection database according to the Darwin Core and submitting it for public access through GBIF.
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Figure 2: Schematic flowchart of the steps taken to format the collection database according to the Darwin Core and submitting it for public access through GBIF.

Mentions: Method step description: The database of bird specimens was developed with the aim of determining the current distribution of avian richness along major river banks. Birds are a particularly useful taxon for conservation assessments since they are easy to identify and are one of the best-known groups in terms of their distribution and abundance (Blair 1999). Many bird species concentrate along river banks and other water bodies and can be used as indicators of ecosystem health (Péron et al. 2013). To obtain a georeferenced database for all specimens in the collection, we followed the procedure represented in Figure 3. We initiated by organizing the information present in the original collection database according to the biodiversity information standards established in Darwin Core 2.0. Each specimen was identified by AMR and all localities specified in the specimen labels were georeferenced using gazeteers (Paynter 1997), maps from the National Institute of Geography (IGAC), Google Earth (URL: http://www.google.com/earth/) and Geonames (URL: http://www.geonames.org/). Finally, we published the database to the GBIF network through the Humboldt Institute, the Colombian GBIF node (Fig. 2). After we finished data collection and validation, we mapped the specimen localities and compared them to other museums (Fig. 1).


Birds of Antioquia: Georeferenced database of specimens from the Colección de Ciencias Naturales del Museo Universitario de la Universidad de Antioquia (MUA).

Rozo AM, Valencia F, Acosta A, Parra JL - Zookeys (2014)

Schematic flowchart of the steps taken to format the collection database according to the Darwin Core and submitting it for public access through GBIF.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042709&req=5

Figure 2: Schematic flowchart of the steps taken to format the collection database according to the Darwin Core and submitting it for public access through GBIF.
Mentions: Method step description: The database of bird specimens was developed with the aim of determining the current distribution of avian richness along major river banks. Birds are a particularly useful taxon for conservation assessments since they are easy to identify and are one of the best-known groups in terms of their distribution and abundance (Blair 1999). Many bird species concentrate along river banks and other water bodies and can be used as indicators of ecosystem health (Péron et al. 2013). To obtain a georeferenced database for all specimens in the collection, we followed the procedure represented in Figure 3. We initiated by organizing the information present in the original collection database according to the biodiversity information standards established in Darwin Core 2.0. Each specimen was identified by AMR and all localities specified in the specimen labels were georeferenced using gazeteers (Paynter 1997), maps from the National Institute of Geography (IGAC), Google Earth (URL: http://www.google.com/earth/) and Geonames (URL: http://www.geonames.org/). Finally, we published the database to the GBIF network through the Humboldt Institute, the Colombian GBIF node (Fig. 2). After we finished data collection and validation, we mapped the specimen localities and compared them to other museums (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: We curated all the information associated with the bird specimens, including the georeferences and taxonomy, and published the database through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility network.The collection holds specimens from three endemic and endangered species (Coeligena orina, Diglossa gloriossisima, and Hypopirrhus pyrohipogaster), and includes localities poorly represented in other collections.The information contained in the collection has been used for biodiversity modeling, conservation planning and management, and we expect to further facilitate these activities by making it publicly available.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Biología, Grupo de Ecología y Evolución de Vertebrados, Universidad de Antioquia, calle 67 No 53-108, Medellín, Colombia.

ABSTRACT
The department of Antioquia, Colombia, lies in the northwestern corner of South America and provides a biogeographical link among divergent faunas, including Caribbean, Andean, Pacific and Amazonian. Information about the distribution of biodiversity in this area is of relevance for academic, practical and social purposes. This data paper describes the dataset containing all bird specimens deposited in the Colección de Ciencias Naturales del Museo Universitario de la Universidad de Antioquia (MUA). We curated all the information associated with the bird specimens, including the georeferences and taxonomy, and published the database through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility network. During this process we checked the species identification and existing georeferences and completed the information when possible. The collection holds 663 bird specimens collected between 1940 and 2011. Even though most specimens are from Antioquia (70%), the collection includes material from several other departments and one specimen from the United States. The collection holds specimens from three endemic and endangered species (Coeligena orina, Diglossa gloriossisima, and Hypopirrhus pyrohipogaster), and includes localities poorly represented in other collections. The information contained in the collection has been used for biodiversity modeling, conservation planning and management, and we expect to further facilitate these activities by making it publicly available.

No MeSH data available.