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Taxonomic notes on the genus Eupoa Żabka, 1985 (Arachnida, Araneae, Salticidae).

Logunov DV, Marusik YM - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: Seven new species are diagnosed, described and illustrated: E. daklak sp. n. (♀) from Viet-Nam; E. lehtineni sp. n. (♂♀) from India, Thailand and Viet-Nam; E. lobli sp. n. (♂) from Malaysia; E. pappi sp. n. (♂) from Thailand; E. pulchella sp. n.(♂) from Thailand; E. schwendingeri sp. n. (♂♀) from Thailand; and E. thailandica sp. n. (♂♀) from Thailand.Eupoa prima Żabka, 1985 and E. yunnanensis Peng & Kim, 1997 are redescribed and illustrated on the basis of type and/or newly collected materials.The female of E. yunnanensis Peng & Kim, 1997 is found and described for the first time.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The Manchester Museum, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK.

ABSTRACT
The south-east Asian genus Eupoa is redescribed and diagnosed. Seven new species are diagnosed, described and illustrated: E. daklak sp. n. (♀) from Viet-Nam; E. lehtineni sp. n. (♂♀) from India, Thailand and Viet-Nam; E. lobli sp. n. (♂) from Malaysia; E. pappi sp. n. (♂) from Thailand; E. pulchella sp. n.(♂) from Thailand; E. schwendingeri sp. n. (♂♀) from Thailand; and E. thailandica sp. n. (♂♀) from Thailand. Eupoa prima Żabka, 1985 and E. yunnanensis Peng & Kim, 1997 are redescribed and illustrated on the basis of type and/or newly collected materials. The female of E. yunnanensis Peng & Kim, 1997 is found and described for the first time.

No MeSH data available.


Copulatory organs of Eupoa thailandica sp. n. (♂ and ♀ paratypes). 111, 113 male palp, median view 112 ditto, ventral view 114 male palp, dorsal view 115 ditto, ventral view 116 ditto, retrolateral view 117 epigyne, ventral view 118 vulva, dorsa view. Abbreviations as explained in ‘Material and methods’. Scale bars: 0.1 mm.
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Figure 18: Copulatory organs of Eupoa thailandica sp. n. (♂ and ♀ paratypes). 111, 113 male palp, median view 112 ditto, ventral view 114 male palp, dorsal view 115 ditto, ventral view 116 ditto, retrolateral view 117 epigyne, ventral view 118 vulva, dorsa view. Abbreviations as explained in ‘Material and methods’. Scale bars: 0.1 mm.

Mentions: Small to very small spiders ranging from about 1.65 to 2.45 mm in length. Sexes similar in general body form; sexual dimorphism is poorly marked and can be seen in the following characters: dorsal scutum presents in males (absent in females), body coloration in males is slightly darker or more contrastingly coloured, anterior and posterior pairs of spinnerets are of contrasting colours in males (brown/dark grey vs. yellow; e.g., Eupoa prima, Eupoa yunnanensis), and legs I and II in males are often with no spines or just with 2/3 pairs of ventral spines on metatarsi (always with spines on tibiae and metatarsi in females; e.g., Eupoa schwendingeri sp. n., Eupoa yunnanensis). Carapace: rather high, with abruptly declining, practically vertical thoracic part (Figs 6, 59, 90); sparsely covered with white elongated pinnate scales (Figs 1–3); fovea absent (Figs 73, 75); lateral sides of carapace, near ALEs, with vertical rows of skin structures (50-60 in a group) looking like either as rounded or elongated smooth bare patches, slightly risen above the surrounding skin (Figs 20, 22), or as flat elongated patches with what looks like several micro-pustules situated on them (Fig. 18); similar bare skin structures occur on leg patellae (see below; Figs 20–21). Eyes: in three rows, with large black areas around eyes (Figs 42–46, 58–59); anterior eye row wider in both sexes, so the quadrangle is as an inverted trapezium; second row midway between ALE and PLE; quadrangle length 52–66% of carapace length. Clypeus: narrow, about 17–47% of AME diameter (from frontal view; Figs 4–5), visibly backward sloping (Figs 6, 59). Chelicerae: small and vertical (Figs 4–5, 7; promargin with two small teeth; retromargin with three small teeth (Fig. 8). Maxillae: slightly convergent; usual shape. Labium: transverse-ovoid. Sternum: as inverted cone with swollen lateral sides (Figs 30, 72, 76). Pedicel: short, in live specimens not visible in dorsal view. Abdomen: elongate, covered with elongated pinnate scales (Fig. 32); dorsal scutum present in males; colour markings on dorsum simple, either consisting of a median yellow stripe (Figs 41, 43, 45) or two rows of spots with a pair of largest sports at the rear of dorsum (Figs 85–86). Book-lung covers: usual shape, not sclerotized. Spinnerets: posterior pair almost two times longer than anterior pair (Figs 31–32). Legs: subequally developed (Fig. 9); legs I in males usually with dark brown longitudinal stripes; trichobothrial bases relatively flat and striated (Fig. 14); tarsal organ as a rounded or ovoid pit (Figs 12–13); tarsal claws narrow, with poorly developed teeth (Figs 10–11); skin structures of two kinds present anteriorly on the dorsal surface of leg patellae, situated in a longitudinal row of about 20–30 pores (arrowed in Figs 19, 21, 23–24): structures of the first kind represents flat elongated and smooth bare patches with what looks like several micro-pustules situated on them (Figs 17, 24); structures of the second kind look like a rounded or elongated or circular smooth bare patch, slightly risen above the surrounding skin (Figs 21; similar bare structures occur on the carapace, see above, Figs 20, 22), these structures resemble the second kind of skin pores described in Neon (Logunov 1998: figs 7, 11). Leg formula: IV,I,III,II in both sexes, rare IV,I,II,III in females. Leg spination: in males legs I and II are often spineless (or with a few spines on Mt I: v 2–2–2ap); in females Tb I v 2–2–2ap, Tb II pr and rt 0–1–0, v 1–1/0 and Mt I and II v 2–2–2ap; in both sexes Tb III and IV usually pr and rt 0–1–0 (or 0–1). Female palp: general form; with an apical claw (arrowed in Figs 15–16). Male palp: swollen and relatively large for the size of the spiders (Figs 42–43); femur of usual shape, except for Eupoa prima (Figs 80–83), shorter than cymbium; patella swollen, with one (Figs 61, 70, 84, etc.) or two (Fig. 80) apophyses that sometimes are as long as the femur (Eupoa prima; Fig. 80) or poorly-developed and inconspicuous (Eupoa lehtineni sp. n.; Fig. 50), or sometimes bifid (Figs 96, 126); tibia shorter than patella, with one or two tibial apophyses (Figs 49, 59, 116, etc.) that sometimes are poorly-developed (Eupoa prima; Figs 81, 84) or covered with long hairs (Eupoa thailandica sp. n.; Fig. 111); cymbium well-developed, sometimes with bunches of white hairs at its basis (e.g., in Eupoa thailandica sp. n.; Figs 106–107); tegulum well-developed (sometimes on one side of the bulb only; e.g., in Eupoa pappi sp. n.; Figs 70–71) and usually with tegular apophysis (Figs 52, 60, etc.), which sometimes poorly-developed (e.g., in Eupoa schwendingeri sp. n.; Fig. 98) or even absent (e.g., in Eupoa pulchella sp. n.; Figs 91–96); median apophysis present (Figs 49, 83, etc.), but sometimes poorly-developed (e.g., in Eupoa pappi sp. n.; Figs 67–68); compound terminal apophysis present and situated inside the apical cavity of tegulum, either thin and long (Figs 52, 61) or strong, with a longitudinal groove on its anterior edge (e.g., in Eupoa pappi sp. n. or Eupoa thailandica sp. n.; Figs 66–68, 109); embolus usually very long and coiled, making 1.5–2 revolutions, with its terminal end resting on top of the cymbium (Figs 36, 51, 62), or can be short (Fig. 94) and even fingerlike and apically bifurcated in some species (Eupoa yunnanensis; Fig. 125). Female copulatory organs: simple, with a pair of copulatory openings that usually spaced up from each other and poorly visible on the epigynal plate; epigynal plate flat (Figs 29, 48, 100) or sometimes with a central shallow atrium (Eupoa yunnanensis; Fig. 127), usually covered with long light hairs (Figs 39–40); insemination ducts relatively short, directed to each other (Fig. 101; see also Żabka (1985: fig. 169) or being subparallel (Figs 53, 118); receptacles rounded or bean-shaped, usually much stronger sclerotized than insemination ducts (Figs 53, 118, 128); in most species receptacles and fertilization ducts are situated at the posterior end of the vulva (near the epigastric furrow), but sometimes lie at its anterior end (Eupoa lehtineni sp. n.; Figs 53–54).


Taxonomic notes on the genus Eupoa Żabka, 1985 (Arachnida, Araneae, Salticidae).

Logunov DV, Marusik YM - Zookeys (2014)

Copulatory organs of Eupoa thailandica sp. n. (♂ and ♀ paratypes). 111, 113 male palp, median view 112 ditto, ventral view 114 male palp, dorsal view 115 ditto, ventral view 116 ditto, retrolateral view 117 epigyne, ventral view 118 vulva, dorsa view. Abbreviations as explained in ‘Material and methods’. Scale bars: 0.1 mm.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
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Figure 18: Copulatory organs of Eupoa thailandica sp. n. (♂ and ♀ paratypes). 111, 113 male palp, median view 112 ditto, ventral view 114 male palp, dorsal view 115 ditto, ventral view 116 ditto, retrolateral view 117 epigyne, ventral view 118 vulva, dorsa view. Abbreviations as explained in ‘Material and methods’. Scale bars: 0.1 mm.
Mentions: Small to very small spiders ranging from about 1.65 to 2.45 mm in length. Sexes similar in general body form; sexual dimorphism is poorly marked and can be seen in the following characters: dorsal scutum presents in males (absent in females), body coloration in males is slightly darker or more contrastingly coloured, anterior and posterior pairs of spinnerets are of contrasting colours in males (brown/dark grey vs. yellow; e.g., Eupoa prima, Eupoa yunnanensis), and legs I and II in males are often with no spines or just with 2/3 pairs of ventral spines on metatarsi (always with spines on tibiae and metatarsi in females; e.g., Eupoa schwendingeri sp. n., Eupoa yunnanensis). Carapace: rather high, with abruptly declining, practically vertical thoracic part (Figs 6, 59, 90); sparsely covered with white elongated pinnate scales (Figs 1–3); fovea absent (Figs 73, 75); lateral sides of carapace, near ALEs, with vertical rows of skin structures (50-60 in a group) looking like either as rounded or elongated smooth bare patches, slightly risen above the surrounding skin (Figs 20, 22), or as flat elongated patches with what looks like several micro-pustules situated on them (Fig. 18); similar bare skin structures occur on leg patellae (see below; Figs 20–21). Eyes: in three rows, with large black areas around eyes (Figs 42–46, 58–59); anterior eye row wider in both sexes, so the quadrangle is as an inverted trapezium; second row midway between ALE and PLE; quadrangle length 52–66% of carapace length. Clypeus: narrow, about 17–47% of AME diameter (from frontal view; Figs 4–5), visibly backward sloping (Figs 6, 59). Chelicerae: small and vertical (Figs 4–5, 7; promargin with two small teeth; retromargin with three small teeth (Fig. 8). Maxillae: slightly convergent; usual shape. Labium: transverse-ovoid. Sternum: as inverted cone with swollen lateral sides (Figs 30, 72, 76). Pedicel: short, in live specimens not visible in dorsal view. Abdomen: elongate, covered with elongated pinnate scales (Fig. 32); dorsal scutum present in males; colour markings on dorsum simple, either consisting of a median yellow stripe (Figs 41, 43, 45) or two rows of spots with a pair of largest sports at the rear of dorsum (Figs 85–86). Book-lung covers: usual shape, not sclerotized. Spinnerets: posterior pair almost two times longer than anterior pair (Figs 31–32). Legs: subequally developed (Fig. 9); legs I in males usually with dark brown longitudinal stripes; trichobothrial bases relatively flat and striated (Fig. 14); tarsal organ as a rounded or ovoid pit (Figs 12–13); tarsal claws narrow, with poorly developed teeth (Figs 10–11); skin structures of two kinds present anteriorly on the dorsal surface of leg patellae, situated in a longitudinal row of about 20–30 pores (arrowed in Figs 19, 21, 23–24): structures of the first kind represents flat elongated and smooth bare patches with what looks like several micro-pustules situated on them (Figs 17, 24); structures of the second kind look like a rounded or elongated or circular smooth bare patch, slightly risen above the surrounding skin (Figs 21; similar bare structures occur on the carapace, see above, Figs 20, 22), these structures resemble the second kind of skin pores described in Neon (Logunov 1998: figs 7, 11). Leg formula: IV,I,III,II in both sexes, rare IV,I,II,III in females. Leg spination: in males legs I and II are often spineless (or with a few spines on Mt I: v 2–2–2ap); in females Tb I v 2–2–2ap, Tb II pr and rt 0–1–0, v 1–1/0 and Mt I and II v 2–2–2ap; in both sexes Tb III and IV usually pr and rt 0–1–0 (or 0–1). Female palp: general form; with an apical claw (arrowed in Figs 15–16). Male palp: swollen and relatively large for the size of the spiders (Figs 42–43); femur of usual shape, except for Eupoa prima (Figs 80–83), shorter than cymbium; patella swollen, with one (Figs 61, 70, 84, etc.) or two (Fig. 80) apophyses that sometimes are as long as the femur (Eupoa prima; Fig. 80) or poorly-developed and inconspicuous (Eupoa lehtineni sp. n.; Fig. 50), or sometimes bifid (Figs 96, 126); tibia shorter than patella, with one or two tibial apophyses (Figs 49, 59, 116, etc.) that sometimes are poorly-developed (Eupoa prima; Figs 81, 84) or covered with long hairs (Eupoa thailandica sp. n.; Fig. 111); cymbium well-developed, sometimes with bunches of white hairs at its basis (e.g., in Eupoa thailandica sp. n.; Figs 106–107); tegulum well-developed (sometimes on one side of the bulb only; e.g., in Eupoa pappi sp. n.; Figs 70–71) and usually with tegular apophysis (Figs 52, 60, etc.), which sometimes poorly-developed (e.g., in Eupoa schwendingeri sp. n.; Fig. 98) or even absent (e.g., in Eupoa pulchella sp. n.; Figs 91–96); median apophysis present (Figs 49, 83, etc.), but sometimes poorly-developed (e.g., in Eupoa pappi sp. n.; Figs 67–68); compound terminal apophysis present and situated inside the apical cavity of tegulum, either thin and long (Figs 52, 61) or strong, with a longitudinal groove on its anterior edge (e.g., in Eupoa pappi sp. n. or Eupoa thailandica sp. n.; Figs 66–68, 109); embolus usually very long and coiled, making 1.5–2 revolutions, with its terminal end resting on top of the cymbium (Figs 36, 51, 62), or can be short (Fig. 94) and even fingerlike and apically bifurcated in some species (Eupoa yunnanensis; Fig. 125). Female copulatory organs: simple, with a pair of copulatory openings that usually spaced up from each other and poorly visible on the epigynal plate; epigynal plate flat (Figs 29, 48, 100) or sometimes with a central shallow atrium (Eupoa yunnanensis; Fig. 127), usually covered with long light hairs (Figs 39–40); insemination ducts relatively short, directed to each other (Fig. 101; see also Żabka (1985: fig. 169) or being subparallel (Figs 53, 118); receptacles rounded or bean-shaped, usually much stronger sclerotized than insemination ducts (Figs 53, 118, 128); in most species receptacles and fertilization ducts are situated at the posterior end of the vulva (near the epigastric furrow), but sometimes lie at its anterior end (Eupoa lehtineni sp. n.; Figs 53–54).

Bottom Line: Seven new species are diagnosed, described and illustrated: E. daklak sp. n. (♀) from Viet-Nam; E. lehtineni sp. n. (♂♀) from India, Thailand and Viet-Nam; E. lobli sp. n. (♂) from Malaysia; E. pappi sp. n. (♂) from Thailand; E. pulchella sp. n.(♂) from Thailand; E. schwendingeri sp. n. (♂♀) from Thailand; and E. thailandica sp. n. (♂♀) from Thailand.Eupoa prima Żabka, 1985 and E. yunnanensis Peng & Kim, 1997 are redescribed and illustrated on the basis of type and/or newly collected materials.The female of E. yunnanensis Peng & Kim, 1997 is found and described for the first time.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The Manchester Museum, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK.

ABSTRACT
The south-east Asian genus Eupoa is redescribed and diagnosed. Seven new species are diagnosed, described and illustrated: E. daklak sp. n. (♀) from Viet-Nam; E. lehtineni sp. n. (♂♀) from India, Thailand and Viet-Nam; E. lobli sp. n. (♂) from Malaysia; E. pappi sp. n. (♂) from Thailand; E. pulchella sp. n.(♂) from Thailand; E. schwendingeri sp. n. (♂♀) from Thailand; and E. thailandica sp. n. (♂♀) from Thailand. Eupoa prima Żabka, 1985 and E. yunnanensis Peng & Kim, 1997 are redescribed and illustrated on the basis of type and/or newly collected materials. The female of E. yunnanensis Peng & Kim, 1997 is found and described for the first time.

No MeSH data available.