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The Hoosier cavefish, a new and endangered species (Amblyopsidae, Amblyopsis) from the caves of southern Indiana.

Chakrabarty P, Prejean JA, Niemiller ML - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: Amblyopsidae) in the genus Amblyopsis from subterranean habitats of southern Indiana, USA.The Hoosier Cavefish, Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., is distinguished from A. spelaea, its only congener, based on genetic, geographic, and morphological evidence.This is the first new cavefish species described from the United States in 40 years and exemplifies how molecular data can alert us to the presence of otherwise cryptic biodiversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Museum of Natural Science, Ichthyology Section, 119 Foster Hall, Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA.

ABSTRACT

We describe a new species of amblyopsid cavefish (percopsiformes: Amblyopsidae) in the genus Amblyopsis from subterranean habitats of southern Indiana, USA. The Hoosier Cavefish, Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., is distinguished from A. spelaea, its only congener, based on genetic, geographic, and morphological evidence. Several morphological features distinguish the new species, including a much plumper, Bibendum-like wrinkled body with rounded fins, and the absence of a premature stop codon in the gene rhodopsin. This is the first new cavefish species described from the United States in 40 years and exemplifies how molecular data can alert us to the presence of otherwise cryptic biodiversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Plots illustrating the relationships between body depth, body width and standard length (SL). Circles in red represent specimens of Amblyopsis hoosieri, sp. n., from north of the Ohio River in Indiana; triangles in blue represent Amblyopsis spelaea from south of the Ohio River in Kentucky. (a) body depth versus standard length, (b) body width versus standard length, and (c) and body depth versus body width as proportions of standard length.
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Figure 3: Plots illustrating the relationships between body depth, body width and standard length (SL). Circles in red represent specimens of Amblyopsis hoosieri, sp. n., from north of the Ohio River in Indiana; triangles in blue represent Amblyopsis spelaea from south of the Ohio River in Kentucky. (a) body depth versus standard length, (b) body width versus standard length, and (c) and body depth versus body width as proportions of standard length.

Mentions: Forty-one specimens were examined, 30 from north of the Ohio River in Indiana, and 11 from south of the river in Kentucky. Specimens from Kentucky included the type locality of Amblyopsis spelaea, Mammoth Cave in Edmonson County. Figure 3 (A–C) shows the results of analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) comparing body depth and body width versus SL. Notably, Amblyopsis hoosieri has a deeper body compared to Amblyopsis spelaea (ANCOVA, p < 0.001; Fig. 3A, C). The body is also wider in Amblyopsis hoosieri compared to Amblyopsis spelaea (ANCOVA, p < 0.001; Fig. 3B, C). Except for juveniles (those under 50 mm), individuals of the new species are deeper and wider bodied than individuals of Amblyopsis spelaea (Fig. 3C). Given individuals of the same standard length, one would expect those of the new species to be much more robust.


The Hoosier cavefish, a new and endangered species (Amblyopsidae, Amblyopsis) from the caves of southern Indiana.

Chakrabarty P, Prejean JA, Niemiller ML - Zookeys (2014)

Plots illustrating the relationships between body depth, body width and standard length (SL). Circles in red represent specimens of Amblyopsis hoosieri, sp. n., from north of the Ohio River in Indiana; triangles in blue represent Amblyopsis spelaea from south of the Ohio River in Kentucky. (a) body depth versus standard length, (b) body width versus standard length, and (c) and body depth versus body width as proportions of standard length.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042695&req=5

Figure 3: Plots illustrating the relationships between body depth, body width and standard length (SL). Circles in red represent specimens of Amblyopsis hoosieri, sp. n., from north of the Ohio River in Indiana; triangles in blue represent Amblyopsis spelaea from south of the Ohio River in Kentucky. (a) body depth versus standard length, (b) body width versus standard length, and (c) and body depth versus body width as proportions of standard length.
Mentions: Forty-one specimens were examined, 30 from north of the Ohio River in Indiana, and 11 from south of the river in Kentucky. Specimens from Kentucky included the type locality of Amblyopsis spelaea, Mammoth Cave in Edmonson County. Figure 3 (A–C) shows the results of analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) comparing body depth and body width versus SL. Notably, Amblyopsis hoosieri has a deeper body compared to Amblyopsis spelaea (ANCOVA, p < 0.001; Fig. 3A, C). The body is also wider in Amblyopsis hoosieri compared to Amblyopsis spelaea (ANCOVA, p < 0.001; Fig. 3B, C). Except for juveniles (those under 50 mm), individuals of the new species are deeper and wider bodied than individuals of Amblyopsis spelaea (Fig. 3C). Given individuals of the same standard length, one would expect those of the new species to be much more robust.

Bottom Line: Amblyopsidae) in the genus Amblyopsis from subterranean habitats of southern Indiana, USA.The Hoosier Cavefish, Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., is distinguished from A. spelaea, its only congener, based on genetic, geographic, and morphological evidence.This is the first new cavefish species described from the United States in 40 years and exemplifies how molecular data can alert us to the presence of otherwise cryptic biodiversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Museum of Natural Science, Ichthyology Section, 119 Foster Hall, Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA.

ABSTRACT

We describe a new species of amblyopsid cavefish (percopsiformes: Amblyopsidae) in the genus Amblyopsis from subterranean habitats of southern Indiana, USA. The Hoosier Cavefish, Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., is distinguished from A. spelaea, its only congener, based on genetic, geographic, and morphological evidence. Several morphological features distinguish the new species, including a much plumper, Bibendum-like wrinkled body with rounded fins, and the absence of a premature stop codon in the gene rhodopsin. This is the first new cavefish species described from the United States in 40 years and exemplifies how molecular data can alert us to the presence of otherwise cryptic biodiversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus