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The Hoosier cavefish, a new and endangered species (Amblyopsidae, Amblyopsis) from the caves of southern Indiana.

Chakrabarty P, Prejean JA, Niemiller ML - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: Amblyopsidae) in the genus Amblyopsis from subterranean habitats of southern Indiana, USA.The Hoosier Cavefish, Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., is distinguished from A. spelaea, its only congener, based on genetic, geographic, and morphological evidence.This is the first new cavefish species described from the United States in 40 years and exemplifies how molecular data can alert us to the presence of otherwise cryptic biodiversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Museum of Natural Science, Ichthyology Section, 119 Foster Hall, Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA.

ABSTRACT

We describe a new species of amblyopsid cavefish (percopsiformes: Amblyopsidae) in the genus Amblyopsis from subterranean habitats of southern Indiana, USA. The Hoosier Cavefish, Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., is distinguished from A. spelaea, its only congener, based on genetic, geographic, and morphological evidence. Several morphological features distinguish the new species, including a much plumper, Bibendum-like wrinkled body with rounded fins, and the absence of a premature stop codon in the gene rhodopsin. This is the first new cavefish species described from the United States in 40 years and exemplifies how molecular data can alert us to the presence of otherwise cryptic biodiversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of Amblyopsis spp., Amblyopsis spelaea and Amblyopsis hoosieri, in the Mitchell Plain and Crawford-Mammoth Uplands of Indiana and Kentucky.
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Figure 2: Distribution of Amblyopsis spp., Amblyopsis spelaea and Amblyopsis hoosieri, in the Mitchell Plain and Crawford-Mammoth Uplands of Indiana and Kentucky.

Mentions: The results of Niemiller et al. (2013d) strongly implicate the Ohio River as a significant barrier to dispersal and, consequently, an isolating mechanism facilitating divergence between populations located north and south of the river (Fig. 2). Poulson (1960) examined variation in morphology throughout much the northern distribution of Amblyopsis spelaea and found subtle differences in pigmentation and rudimentary eye size; however, he only examined specimens from the Mammoth Cave region for the southern range of the species. Therefore, it is unclear whether phenotypic differences exist between phylogenetic lineages identified by Niemiller et al. (2013d). In this study, we examined morphological variation from individuals of the northern and southern lineages of Amblyopsis identified by Niemiller et al. (2013d), and included specimens from populations for which material for DNA sequencing were previously unavailable. Based on our results, we describe the northern lineage as Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., from subterranean waters of southern Indiana.


The Hoosier cavefish, a new and endangered species (Amblyopsidae, Amblyopsis) from the caves of southern Indiana.

Chakrabarty P, Prejean JA, Niemiller ML - Zookeys (2014)

Distribution of Amblyopsis spp., Amblyopsis spelaea and Amblyopsis hoosieri, in the Mitchell Plain and Crawford-Mammoth Uplands of Indiana and Kentucky.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042695&req=5

Figure 2: Distribution of Amblyopsis spp., Amblyopsis spelaea and Amblyopsis hoosieri, in the Mitchell Plain and Crawford-Mammoth Uplands of Indiana and Kentucky.
Mentions: The results of Niemiller et al. (2013d) strongly implicate the Ohio River as a significant barrier to dispersal and, consequently, an isolating mechanism facilitating divergence between populations located north and south of the river (Fig. 2). Poulson (1960) examined variation in morphology throughout much the northern distribution of Amblyopsis spelaea and found subtle differences in pigmentation and rudimentary eye size; however, he only examined specimens from the Mammoth Cave region for the southern range of the species. Therefore, it is unclear whether phenotypic differences exist between phylogenetic lineages identified by Niemiller et al. (2013d). In this study, we examined morphological variation from individuals of the northern and southern lineages of Amblyopsis identified by Niemiller et al. (2013d), and included specimens from populations for which material for DNA sequencing were previously unavailable. Based on our results, we describe the northern lineage as Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., from subterranean waters of southern Indiana.

Bottom Line: Amblyopsidae) in the genus Amblyopsis from subterranean habitats of southern Indiana, USA.The Hoosier Cavefish, Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., is distinguished from A. spelaea, its only congener, based on genetic, geographic, and morphological evidence.This is the first new cavefish species described from the United States in 40 years and exemplifies how molecular data can alert us to the presence of otherwise cryptic biodiversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Museum of Natural Science, Ichthyology Section, 119 Foster Hall, Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA.

ABSTRACT

We describe a new species of amblyopsid cavefish (percopsiformes: Amblyopsidae) in the genus Amblyopsis from subterranean habitats of southern Indiana, USA. The Hoosier Cavefish, Amblyopsis hoosieri sp. n., is distinguished from A. spelaea, its only congener, based on genetic, geographic, and morphological evidence. Several morphological features distinguish the new species, including a much plumper, Bibendum-like wrinkled body with rounded fins, and the absence of a premature stop codon in the gene rhodopsin. This is the first new cavefish species described from the United States in 40 years and exemplifies how molecular data can alert us to the presence of otherwise cryptic biodiversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus