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Information Needs Priorities in Patients Diagnosed With Cancer: A Systematic Review.

Tariman JD, Doorenbos A, Schepp KG, Singhal S, Berry DL - J Adv Pract Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: Thirty studies involving patients with breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, gynecologic, hematologic, and other cancers revealed patients' information needs priorities.The top three patient information priorities were related to prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment options.Being able to prioritize the most-needed information can make patient encounters more meaningful and useful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing/College of Science and Health at De Paul University, Chicago, Illinois.

ABSTRACT
Information-sharing is an integral part of cancer care. Several studies have examined the information needs of patients with various types of cancer. However, the priorities of information needs among patients with cancer have not been reported. A systematic review was performed to identify published studies that examined priorities of information needs in patients with cancer. PubMed (1966 to February 2012), PsycINFO (1967 to February 2012), and CINAHL (1982 to February 2012) databases were searched to access relevant medical, psychological, and nursing literature. Thirty studies involving patients with breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, gynecologic, hematologic, and other cancers revealed patients' information needs priorities. The top three patient information priorities were related to prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment options. The top information priorities reported in this systematic review could serve as a start to elicit patients' information needs and guide patient education across the cancer care continuum. Being able to prioritize the most-needed information can make patient encounters more meaningful and useful.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Table 1. Summary of Information Needs Priorities in Cancer Patients
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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T2: Table 1. Summary of Information Needs Priorities in Cancer Patients


Information Needs Priorities in Patients Diagnosed With Cancer: A Systematic Review.

Tariman JD, Doorenbos A, Schepp KG, Singhal S, Berry DL - J Adv Pract Oncol (2014)

Table 1. Summary of Information Needs Priorities in Cancer Patients
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042668&req=5

T2: Table 1. Summary of Information Needs Priorities in Cancer Patients
Bottom Line: Thirty studies involving patients with breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, gynecologic, hematologic, and other cancers revealed patients' information needs priorities.The top three patient information priorities were related to prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment options.Being able to prioritize the most-needed information can make patient encounters more meaningful and useful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing/College of Science and Health at De Paul University, Chicago, Illinois.

ABSTRACT
Information-sharing is an integral part of cancer care. Several studies have examined the information needs of patients with various types of cancer. However, the priorities of information needs among patients with cancer have not been reported. A systematic review was performed to identify published studies that examined priorities of information needs in patients with cancer. PubMed (1966 to February 2012), PsycINFO (1967 to February 2012), and CINAHL (1982 to February 2012) databases were searched to access relevant medical, psychological, and nursing literature. Thirty studies involving patients with breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, gynecologic, hematologic, and other cancers revealed patients' information needs priorities. The top three patient information priorities were related to prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment options. The top information priorities reported in this systematic review could serve as a start to elicit patients' information needs and guide patient education across the cancer care continuum. Being able to prioritize the most-needed information can make patient encounters more meaningful and useful.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus