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The relationship between the number of repetitions performed at given intensities is different in endurance and strength trained athletes.

Richens B, Cleather DJ - Biol Sport (2014)

Bottom Line: One approach is to base training prescription on the number of repetitions performed at a given percentage of repetition maximum due to the correlation found between these two measures.The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of an athlete's training background on the relationship between the load lifted (as a percentage of one repetition maximum) and the number of repetitions achieved.The endurance runners completed significantly more repetitions than the weightlifters at 70% (39.9 ± 17.6 versus 17.9 ± 2.8; p < 0.05) and 80% (19.8 ± 6.4 versus 11.8 ± 2.7; p < 0.05) of their one repetition maximum but not at 90% (10.8 ± 3.9 versus 7.0 ± 2.1; p > 0.05) of one repetition maximum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Sport, Health and Applied Sciences, St Mary's University, Waldegrave Road, Twickenham, UK.

ABSTRACT
Prescribing training intensity and volume is a key problem when designing resistance training programmes. One approach is to base training prescription on the number of repetitions performed at a given percentage of repetition maximum due to the correlation found between these two measures. However, previous research has raised questions as to the accuracy of this method, as the repetitions completed at different percentages of 1RM can differ based upon the characteristics of the athlete. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of an athlete's training background on the relationship between the load lifted (as a percentage of one repetition maximum) and the number of repetitions achieved. Eight weightlifters and eight endurance runners each completed a one repetition maximum test on the leg press and completed repetitions to fatigue at 90, 80 and 70% of their one repetition maximum. The endurance runners completed significantly more repetitions than the weightlifters at 70% (39.9 ± 17.6 versus 17.9 ± 2.8; p < 0.05) and 80% (19.8 ± 6.4 versus 11.8 ± 2.7; p < 0.05) of their one repetition maximum but not at 90% (10.8 ± 3.9 versus 7.0 ± 2.1; p > 0.05) of one repetition maximum. These differences could be explained by the contrasting training adaptations demanded by each sport. This study suggests that traditional guidelines may underestimate the potential number of repetitions that can be completed at a given percentage of 1RM, particularly for endurance trained athletes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

COMPARISON OF WEIGHTLIFTING AND ENDURANCE GROUPS WITH BAECHLE AND EARLE [3] AND MAYHEW ET AL. [18] FOR AMOUNT OF REPETITIONS COMPLETED AT SELECTED PERCENTAGES OF 1RM.
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Figure 0001: COMPARISON OF WEIGHTLIFTING AND ENDURANCE GROUPS WITH BAECHLE AND EARLE [3] AND MAYHEW ET AL. [18] FOR AMOUNT OF REPETITIONS COMPLETED AT SELECTED PERCENTAGES OF 1RM.

Mentions: Resistance training experience and 1RM of the participants are detailed in Table 2, with higher 1RM scores and weight training experience found in the WT group. In both groups (within group analysis) the amount of repetitions completed increased significantly as the percentage of 1RM decreased. Comparison of the two groups revealed that the ET group completed significantly more repetitions than the WT group at 70% 1RM and 80% 1RM, however no significant difference was found in repetitions to fatigue at 90% 1RM (Table 2 and Figure 1).


The relationship between the number of repetitions performed at given intensities is different in endurance and strength trained athletes.

Richens B, Cleather DJ - Biol Sport (2014)

COMPARISON OF WEIGHTLIFTING AND ENDURANCE GROUPS WITH BAECHLE AND EARLE [3] AND MAYHEW ET AL. [18] FOR AMOUNT OF REPETITIONS COMPLETED AT SELECTED PERCENTAGES OF 1RM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042664&req=5

Figure 0001: COMPARISON OF WEIGHTLIFTING AND ENDURANCE GROUPS WITH BAECHLE AND EARLE [3] AND MAYHEW ET AL. [18] FOR AMOUNT OF REPETITIONS COMPLETED AT SELECTED PERCENTAGES OF 1RM.
Mentions: Resistance training experience and 1RM of the participants are detailed in Table 2, with higher 1RM scores and weight training experience found in the WT group. In both groups (within group analysis) the amount of repetitions completed increased significantly as the percentage of 1RM decreased. Comparison of the two groups revealed that the ET group completed significantly more repetitions than the WT group at 70% 1RM and 80% 1RM, however no significant difference was found in repetitions to fatigue at 90% 1RM (Table 2 and Figure 1).

Bottom Line: One approach is to base training prescription on the number of repetitions performed at a given percentage of repetition maximum due to the correlation found between these two measures.The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of an athlete's training background on the relationship between the load lifted (as a percentage of one repetition maximum) and the number of repetitions achieved.The endurance runners completed significantly more repetitions than the weightlifters at 70% (39.9 ± 17.6 versus 17.9 ± 2.8; p < 0.05) and 80% (19.8 ± 6.4 versus 11.8 ± 2.7; p < 0.05) of their one repetition maximum but not at 90% (10.8 ± 3.9 versus 7.0 ± 2.1; p > 0.05) of one repetition maximum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Sport, Health and Applied Sciences, St Mary's University, Waldegrave Road, Twickenham, UK.

ABSTRACT
Prescribing training intensity and volume is a key problem when designing resistance training programmes. One approach is to base training prescription on the number of repetitions performed at a given percentage of repetition maximum due to the correlation found between these two measures. However, previous research has raised questions as to the accuracy of this method, as the repetitions completed at different percentages of 1RM can differ based upon the characteristics of the athlete. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of an athlete's training background on the relationship between the load lifted (as a percentage of one repetition maximum) and the number of repetitions achieved. Eight weightlifters and eight endurance runners each completed a one repetition maximum test on the leg press and completed repetitions to fatigue at 90, 80 and 70% of their one repetition maximum. The endurance runners completed significantly more repetitions than the weightlifters at 70% (39.9 ± 17.6 versus 17.9 ± 2.8; p < 0.05) and 80% (19.8 ± 6.4 versus 11.8 ± 2.7; p < 0.05) of their one repetition maximum but not at 90% (10.8 ± 3.9 versus 7.0 ± 2.1; p > 0.05) of one repetition maximum. These differences could be explained by the contrasting training adaptations demanded by each sport. This study suggests that traditional guidelines may underestimate the potential number of repetitions that can be completed at a given percentage of 1RM, particularly for endurance trained athletes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus