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The influence of obesity and ambient temperature on physiological and oxidative responses to submaximal exercise.

Ahn N, Kim K - Biol Sport (2014)

Bottom Line: Study variables were measured during a 60 min submaximal exercise test at 60% VO2max in a neutral (21±1°C) and a cold (4±1°C) environment.Heart rate, blood lactate, rectal temperature, serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured at rest, during exercise and in recovery.Heart rate of both groups was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the cold than the warm environment, but there were no significant differences between the two groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Leisure and Sports Studies, College of Physical Education, Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the effects of obesity and ambient temperature on physiological responses and markers of oxidative stress to submaximal exercise in obese and lean people. Sixteen healthy males were divided into an obese group (n=8, %fat: 27.00±3.00%) and a lean group (n=8, %fat: 13.85±2.45%). Study variables were measured during a 60 min submaximal exercise test at 60% VO2max in a neutral (21±1°C) and a cold (4±1°C) environment. Heart rate, blood lactate, rectal temperature, serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured at rest, during exercise and in recovery. Heart rate of both groups was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the cold than the warm environment, but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Serum SOD activity increased to a significantly greater extent (P<0.05) in the cold than the neutral environment, and remained elevated for longer during exercise in the obese group than the lean group. Serum MDA level during submaximal exercise was not significantly different between conditions or groups. Cold stress in exercise may challenge antioxidant defence mechanisms in obese subjects, but lipid peroxidation remains unchanged.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

COMPARISON OF RECTAL TEMPERATURE DURING SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE BETWEEN OBESE AND LEAN GROUPS.
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Figure 0003: COMPARISON OF RECTAL TEMPERATURE DURING SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE BETWEEN OBESE AND LEAN GROUPS.

Mentions: Rectal temperature also tended to be lower in the cold than the neutral conditions, but these differences were not significant between conditions or groups . However, there was a significant time×temperature×group interaction for rectal temperature (F=3.012, P<0.05). Rectal temperature was higher in the obese group than the lean group in neutral conditions, and the pattern of changes with time in the obese group was different between conditions (Figure 3).


The influence of obesity and ambient temperature on physiological and oxidative responses to submaximal exercise.

Ahn N, Kim K - Biol Sport (2014)

COMPARISON OF RECTAL TEMPERATURE DURING SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE BETWEEN OBESE AND LEAN GROUPS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042661&req=5

Figure 0003: COMPARISON OF RECTAL TEMPERATURE DURING SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE BETWEEN OBESE AND LEAN GROUPS.
Mentions: Rectal temperature also tended to be lower in the cold than the neutral conditions, but these differences were not significant between conditions or groups . However, there was a significant time×temperature×group interaction for rectal temperature (F=3.012, P<0.05). Rectal temperature was higher in the obese group than the lean group in neutral conditions, and the pattern of changes with time in the obese group was different between conditions (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Study variables were measured during a 60 min submaximal exercise test at 60% VO2max in a neutral (21±1°C) and a cold (4±1°C) environment.Heart rate, blood lactate, rectal temperature, serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured at rest, during exercise and in recovery.Heart rate of both groups was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the cold than the warm environment, but there were no significant differences between the two groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Leisure and Sports Studies, College of Physical Education, Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the effects of obesity and ambient temperature on physiological responses and markers of oxidative stress to submaximal exercise in obese and lean people. Sixteen healthy males were divided into an obese group (n=8, %fat: 27.00±3.00%) and a lean group (n=8, %fat: 13.85±2.45%). Study variables were measured during a 60 min submaximal exercise test at 60% VO2max in a neutral (21±1°C) and a cold (4±1°C) environment. Heart rate, blood lactate, rectal temperature, serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured at rest, during exercise and in recovery. Heart rate of both groups was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the cold than the warm environment, but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Serum SOD activity increased to a significantly greater extent (P<0.05) in the cold than the neutral environment, and remained elevated for longer during exercise in the obese group than the lean group. Serum MDA level during submaximal exercise was not significantly different between conditions or groups. Cold stress in exercise may challenge antioxidant defence mechanisms in obese subjects, but lipid peroxidation remains unchanged.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus