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Energy requirements of US Army Special Operation Forces during military training.

Margolis LM, Crombie AP, McClung HL, McGraw SM, Rood JC, Montain SJ, Young AJ - Nutrients (2014)

Bottom Line: Overall energy expenditure adjusted for body composition was 17,606 ± 2326 kJ·day(-1).Energy expenditure was 19,110 ± 1468 kJ·day(-1) during CDQC and 16,334 ± 2180 kJ·day(-1) during PMT, with physical activity levels of 2.6 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.3 during CDQC and PMT, respectively.Compared to the Military Dietary Reference Intakes for energy (13,598 kJ·day(-1)), these data are in agreement with previous reports that energy requirement for SOF Soldiers exceed that of the average soldier.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Military Nutrition Division, United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, 15 Kansas Street, Building 42, Natick, MA 01760, USA. lee.m.margolis.ctr@mail.mil.

ABSTRACT
Special Operations Forces (SOF) regularly engage in physically demanding combat operations and field training exercises, resulting in high daily energy expenditure, and thus increased energy requirements. However, the majority of studies assessing energy requirements of SOF have been conducted on soldiers going through intense SOF initiation training. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the energy expenditure of SOF conducting military training operations. Thirty-one soldiers taking part in Pre-Mission Training (PMT n = 15) and Combat Diver Qualification Courses (CDQC n = 16) volunteered to participate in this observational study. Energy expenditure was determined using doubly labeled water. Body weight (83 ± 7 kg) remained stable during both training periods. Overall energy expenditure adjusted for body composition was 17,606 ± 2326 kJ·day(-1). Energy expenditure was 19,110 ± 1468 kJ·day(-1) during CDQC and 16,334 ± 2180 kJ·day(-1) during PMT, with physical activity levels of 2.6 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.3 during CDQC and PMT, respectively. Compared to the Military Dietary Reference Intakes for energy (13,598 kJ·day(-1)), these data are in agreement with previous reports that energy requirement for SOF Soldiers exceed that of the average soldier.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Total daily energy expenditure. Values are mean ± SD. (□) resting metabolic rate, () diet-induced thermogenesis, (■) activity-induced energy expenditure. + Total daily energy expenditure different from MDRI, P < 0.05; † MDRI; military dietary reference intakes 13,598 kJ·day−1.
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nutrients-06-01945-f002: Total daily energy expenditure. Values are mean ± SD. (□) resting metabolic rate, () diet-induced thermogenesis, (■) activity-induced energy expenditure. + Total daily energy expenditure different from MDRI, P < 0.05; † MDRI; military dietary reference intakes 13,598 kJ·day−1.

Mentions: Compared to the MDRI for energy both CDQC and PMT elicited energy expenditure exceeding (P < 0.05) energy needs (13,598 kJ·day−1) for the average male soldier. Overall, adjusted total daily energy expenditure for the two training periods was 17,606 ± 2326 kJ·day−1. Background enrichments of 2H and 18O for placebo control participants during PMT and CDQC remained constant throughout the training period. Energy expenditure during CDQC was 19,110 ± 1468 kJ·day−1, while observed energy expenditure during PMT was of 16,334 ± 2180 kJ·day−1 (Figure 2). This range in energy expenditure between PMT and CDQC was maintained after adjusting for fat mass and fat-free mass as covariates. Resting metabolic rate was 7313 ± 473 kJ·day−1 for soldiers taking part in CDQC and 7524 ± 420 kJ·day−1 for soldiers conducting PMT. Physical activity levels were 2.6 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.3 during CDQC and PMT, respectively, with activity-induced energy expenditure accounting for 52% (9886 ± 1068 kJ·day−1) of total daily energy expenditure during CDQC and 44% (7177 ± 1843 kJ·day−1) of total daily energy expenditure during PMT.


Energy requirements of US Army Special Operation Forces during military training.

Margolis LM, Crombie AP, McClung HL, McGraw SM, Rood JC, Montain SJ, Young AJ - Nutrients (2014)

Total daily energy expenditure. Values are mean ± SD. (□) resting metabolic rate, () diet-induced thermogenesis, (■) activity-induced energy expenditure. + Total daily energy expenditure different from MDRI, P < 0.05; † MDRI; military dietary reference intakes 13,598 kJ·day−1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042567&req=5

nutrients-06-01945-f002: Total daily energy expenditure. Values are mean ± SD. (□) resting metabolic rate, () diet-induced thermogenesis, (■) activity-induced energy expenditure. + Total daily energy expenditure different from MDRI, P < 0.05; † MDRI; military dietary reference intakes 13,598 kJ·day−1.
Mentions: Compared to the MDRI for energy both CDQC and PMT elicited energy expenditure exceeding (P < 0.05) energy needs (13,598 kJ·day−1) for the average male soldier. Overall, adjusted total daily energy expenditure for the two training periods was 17,606 ± 2326 kJ·day−1. Background enrichments of 2H and 18O for placebo control participants during PMT and CDQC remained constant throughout the training period. Energy expenditure during CDQC was 19,110 ± 1468 kJ·day−1, while observed energy expenditure during PMT was of 16,334 ± 2180 kJ·day−1 (Figure 2). This range in energy expenditure between PMT and CDQC was maintained after adjusting for fat mass and fat-free mass as covariates. Resting metabolic rate was 7313 ± 473 kJ·day−1 for soldiers taking part in CDQC and 7524 ± 420 kJ·day−1 for soldiers conducting PMT. Physical activity levels were 2.6 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.3 during CDQC and PMT, respectively, with activity-induced energy expenditure accounting for 52% (9886 ± 1068 kJ·day−1) of total daily energy expenditure during CDQC and 44% (7177 ± 1843 kJ·day−1) of total daily energy expenditure during PMT.

Bottom Line: Overall energy expenditure adjusted for body composition was 17,606 ± 2326 kJ·day(-1).Energy expenditure was 19,110 ± 1468 kJ·day(-1) during CDQC and 16,334 ± 2180 kJ·day(-1) during PMT, with physical activity levels of 2.6 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.3 during CDQC and PMT, respectively.Compared to the Military Dietary Reference Intakes for energy (13,598 kJ·day(-1)), these data are in agreement with previous reports that energy requirement for SOF Soldiers exceed that of the average soldier.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Military Nutrition Division, United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, 15 Kansas Street, Building 42, Natick, MA 01760, USA. lee.m.margolis.ctr@mail.mil.

ABSTRACT
Special Operations Forces (SOF) regularly engage in physically demanding combat operations and field training exercises, resulting in high daily energy expenditure, and thus increased energy requirements. However, the majority of studies assessing energy requirements of SOF have been conducted on soldiers going through intense SOF initiation training. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the energy expenditure of SOF conducting military training operations. Thirty-one soldiers taking part in Pre-Mission Training (PMT n = 15) and Combat Diver Qualification Courses (CDQC n = 16) volunteered to participate in this observational study. Energy expenditure was determined using doubly labeled water. Body weight (83 ± 7 kg) remained stable during both training periods. Overall energy expenditure adjusted for body composition was 17,606 ± 2326 kJ·day(-1). Energy expenditure was 19,110 ± 1468 kJ·day(-1) during CDQC and 16,334 ± 2180 kJ·day(-1) during PMT, with physical activity levels of 2.6 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.3 during CDQC and PMT, respectively. Compared to the Military Dietary Reference Intakes for energy (13,598 kJ·day(-1)), these data are in agreement with previous reports that energy requirement for SOF Soldiers exceed that of the average soldier.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus