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Vitamin B₁₂-containing plant food sources for vegetarians.

Watanabe F, Yabuta Y, Bito T, Teng F - Nutrients (2014)

Bottom Line: To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12.Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Applied Bioresources Chemistry, The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553, Japan. watanabe@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
The usual dietary sources of Vitamin B12 are animal-derived foods, although a few plant-based foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12. To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12. A survey of naturally occurring plant-derived food sources with high Vitamin B12 contents suggested that dried purple laver (nori) is the most suitable Vitamin B12 source presently available for vegetarians. Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups.

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Structural formula of Vitamin B12 and partial structures of Vitamin B12 compounds. The partial structures of the Vitamin B12 compounds only show the regions of the molecule that differ from Vitamin B12. (1) 5′-Deoxyadenosylcobalamin; (2) methylcobalamin; (3) hydroxocobalamin; and (4) cyanocobalamin or Vitamin B12.
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nutrients-06-01861-f001: Structural formula of Vitamin B12 and partial structures of Vitamin B12 compounds. The partial structures of the Vitamin B12 compounds only show the regions of the molecule that differ from Vitamin B12. (1) 5′-Deoxyadenosylcobalamin; (2) methylcobalamin; (3) hydroxocobalamin; and (4) cyanocobalamin or Vitamin B12.

Mentions: Vitamin B12 (molecular weight = 1355.4) belongs to the “corrinoids” group, which comprises compounds that contain a corrin macrocycle. The term “Vitamin B12” is usually restricted to cyanocobalamin, which is the most chemically stable and unnatural form of cobalamin [1], but Vitamin B12 refers to all potentially biologically active cobalamins in the present review. Cyanocobalamin is included in most human dietary supplements, and it is readily converted into the coenzyme forms of cobalamin, i.e., methylcobalamin functions as a coenzyme for methionine synthase (EC 2.1.1.13; involved in methionine biosynthesis), and 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin functions as a coenzyme for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (EC 5.4.99.2; involved in amino acid and odd-chain fatty acid metabolism in mammalian cells) [2,3] (Figure 1). Corrinoids with a base other than 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole as the lower ligand (cobalt-coordinated nucleotide) were recently found in certain foods and they are inactive in humans [4].


Vitamin B₁₂-containing plant food sources for vegetarians.

Watanabe F, Yabuta Y, Bito T, Teng F - Nutrients (2014)

Structural formula of Vitamin B12 and partial structures of Vitamin B12 compounds. The partial structures of the Vitamin B12 compounds only show the regions of the molecule that differ from Vitamin B12. (1) 5′-Deoxyadenosylcobalamin; (2) methylcobalamin; (3) hydroxocobalamin; and (4) cyanocobalamin or Vitamin B12.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042564&req=5

nutrients-06-01861-f001: Structural formula of Vitamin B12 and partial structures of Vitamin B12 compounds. The partial structures of the Vitamin B12 compounds only show the regions of the molecule that differ from Vitamin B12. (1) 5′-Deoxyadenosylcobalamin; (2) methylcobalamin; (3) hydroxocobalamin; and (4) cyanocobalamin or Vitamin B12.
Mentions: Vitamin B12 (molecular weight = 1355.4) belongs to the “corrinoids” group, which comprises compounds that contain a corrin macrocycle. The term “Vitamin B12” is usually restricted to cyanocobalamin, which is the most chemically stable and unnatural form of cobalamin [1], but Vitamin B12 refers to all potentially biologically active cobalamins in the present review. Cyanocobalamin is included in most human dietary supplements, and it is readily converted into the coenzyme forms of cobalamin, i.e., methylcobalamin functions as a coenzyme for methionine synthase (EC 2.1.1.13; involved in methionine biosynthesis), and 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin functions as a coenzyme for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (EC 5.4.99.2; involved in amino acid and odd-chain fatty acid metabolism in mammalian cells) [2,3] (Figure 1). Corrinoids with a base other than 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole as the lower ligand (cobalt-coordinated nucleotide) were recently found in certain foods and they are inactive in humans [4].

Bottom Line: To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12.Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Applied Bioresources Chemistry, The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553, Japan. watanabe@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
The usual dietary sources of Vitamin B12 are animal-derived foods, although a few plant-based foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12. To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12. A survey of naturally occurring plant-derived food sources with high Vitamin B12 contents suggested that dried purple laver (nori) is the most suitable Vitamin B12 source presently available for vegetarians. Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus