Limits...
Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with components of the metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

Chan TF, Lin WT, Huang HL, Lee CY, Wu PW, Chiu YW, Huang CC, Tsai S, Lin CL, Lee CH - Nutrients (2014)

Bottom Line: Male moderate and high consuming SSB drinkers exhibited triglyceride levels that were 8.0 and 8.2 mg/dL significantly higher, respectively, than those of nondrinkers.High SSB consumption was also linked to 1.9-fold (95% CIs: 1.1-3.1) and 2.7-fold (95% CIs: 1.3-5.7) higher risks of being at a greater overall metabolic risk in girls and boys, respectively.In conclusion, a high SSB intake is associated with adolescent MetS among boys but not girls in Taiwan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan. tefu.chan@msa.hinet.net.

ABSTRACT
Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are the principle source of added sugar in diets. Cardiometabolic disturbances can occur from early childhood to adulthood. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the gender-specific association of SSB intake with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components among adolescents in Taiwan. A total of 2727 adolescents aged 12 to 16 years randomly selected from three diverse economic areas in Southern Taiwan by using a multistage-sampling strategy participated in this study. Demographic, dietary, physical and anthropometric parameters were measured, and serum lipid profiles and glucose levels were determined. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) specifies that MetS requires abdominal obesity and ≥2 abnormal components, and Cook criteria for MetS require ≥3 abnormal components. We applied survey-data modules to data analyses, and used multiple regression and logistic models to adjust for covariates. An increased SSB intake was linked to a greater waist circumference in both sexes and to systolic blood pressure in boys (P for trend: ≤0.043). Male moderate and high consuming SSB drinkers exhibited triglyceride levels that were 8.0 and 8.2 mg/dL significantly higher, respectively, than those of nondrinkers. Compared with nondrinkers, boys who consumed >500 mL/day (high quantity) of SSBs exhibited 10.3-fold (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.2-90.2) and 5.1-fold (95% CIs: 1.01-25.5) risks of contracting MetS, as defined by the IDF and Cook criteria for MetS, respectively. In girls, the risk estimates for the same comparison were not significant by the IDF criteria (6.5-fold risk, 95% CIs: 0.9-∞) or Cook criteria (5.9-fold risk, 95% CIs: 0.8-43.8) for MetS. High SSB consumption was also linked to 1.9-fold (95% CIs: 1.1-3.1) and 2.7-fold (95% CIs: 1.3-5.7) higher risks of being at a greater overall metabolic risk in girls and boys, respectively. In conclusion, a high SSB intake is associated with adolescent MetS among boys but not girls in Taiwan.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Adjusted (adj.) mean and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of metabolic syndrome components associated with low (L), median (M) and high (H) metabolic risk clusters in girls (A) and in boys (B).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042561&req=5

nutrients-06-02088-f001: Adjusted (adj.) mean and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of metabolic syndrome components associated with low (L), median (M) and high (H) metabolic risk clusters in girls (A) and in boys (B).

Mentions: As shown in Figure 1, boys at a high metabolic risk exhibited greater WC and TG, FPG, SBP and DBP levels than did those at a low metabolic risk. Similarly, a higher level of these four MetS components and a lower concentration of HDL-C were observed in girls at a high metabolic risk compared with those at a low metabolic risk. These results indicated that the data-driven risk clusters were suitable for determining the risk of developing adolescent MetS.


Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with components of the metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

Chan TF, Lin WT, Huang HL, Lee CY, Wu PW, Chiu YW, Huang CC, Tsai S, Lin CL, Lee CH - Nutrients (2014)

Adjusted (adj.) mean and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of metabolic syndrome components associated with low (L), median (M) and high (H) metabolic risk clusters in girls (A) and in boys (B).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042561&req=5

nutrients-06-02088-f001: Adjusted (adj.) mean and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of metabolic syndrome components associated with low (L), median (M) and high (H) metabolic risk clusters in girls (A) and in boys (B).
Mentions: As shown in Figure 1, boys at a high metabolic risk exhibited greater WC and TG, FPG, SBP and DBP levels than did those at a low metabolic risk. Similarly, a higher level of these four MetS components and a lower concentration of HDL-C were observed in girls at a high metabolic risk compared with those at a low metabolic risk. These results indicated that the data-driven risk clusters were suitable for determining the risk of developing adolescent MetS.

Bottom Line: Male moderate and high consuming SSB drinkers exhibited triglyceride levels that were 8.0 and 8.2 mg/dL significantly higher, respectively, than those of nondrinkers.High SSB consumption was also linked to 1.9-fold (95% CIs: 1.1-3.1) and 2.7-fold (95% CIs: 1.3-5.7) higher risks of being at a greater overall metabolic risk in girls and boys, respectively.In conclusion, a high SSB intake is associated with adolescent MetS among boys but not girls in Taiwan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan. tefu.chan@msa.hinet.net.

ABSTRACT
Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are the principle source of added sugar in diets. Cardiometabolic disturbances can occur from early childhood to adulthood. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the gender-specific association of SSB intake with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components among adolescents in Taiwan. A total of 2727 adolescents aged 12 to 16 years randomly selected from three diverse economic areas in Southern Taiwan by using a multistage-sampling strategy participated in this study. Demographic, dietary, physical and anthropometric parameters were measured, and serum lipid profiles and glucose levels were determined. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) specifies that MetS requires abdominal obesity and ≥2 abnormal components, and Cook criteria for MetS require ≥3 abnormal components. We applied survey-data modules to data analyses, and used multiple regression and logistic models to adjust for covariates. An increased SSB intake was linked to a greater waist circumference in both sexes and to systolic blood pressure in boys (P for trend: ≤0.043). Male moderate and high consuming SSB drinkers exhibited triglyceride levels that were 8.0 and 8.2 mg/dL significantly higher, respectively, than those of nondrinkers. Compared with nondrinkers, boys who consumed >500 mL/day (high quantity) of SSBs exhibited 10.3-fold (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.2-90.2) and 5.1-fold (95% CIs: 1.01-25.5) risks of contracting MetS, as defined by the IDF and Cook criteria for MetS, respectively. In girls, the risk estimates for the same comparison were not significant by the IDF criteria (6.5-fold risk, 95% CIs: 0.9-∞) or Cook criteria (5.9-fold risk, 95% CIs: 0.8-43.8) for MetS. High SSB consumption was also linked to 1.9-fold (95% CIs: 1.1-3.1) and 2.7-fold (95% CIs: 1.3-5.7) higher risks of being at a greater overall metabolic risk in girls and boys, respectively. In conclusion, a high SSB intake is associated with adolescent MetS among boys but not girls in Taiwan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus