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Embodied mental rotation: a special link between egocentric transformation and the bodily self.

Kaltner S, Riecke BE, Jansen P - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: In line with this, we expected that images of the own body are solved faster than another person's body stimuli.Results showed a benefit of motor expertise and representations of another person's body, but only for the object-based transformation task.Regarding stimulus material, the other-advantage ascribed to increased self-awareness-consciousness distracting attention-demanding resources, disappeared in the egocentric condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Sport Science, University of Regensburg Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This experiment investigated the influence of motor expertise on object-based versus egocentric transformations in a chronometric mental rotation task using images of either the own or another person's body as stimulus material. According to the embodied cognition viewpoint, we hypothesized motor-experts to outperform non-motor experts specifically in the egocentric condition because of higher kinesthetic representation and motor simulations compared to object-based transformations. In line with this, we expected that images of the own body are solved faster than another person's body stimuli. Results showed a benefit of motor expertise and representations of another person's body, but only for the object-based transformation task. That is, this other-advantage diminishes in egocentric transformations. Since motor experts did not show any specific expertise in rotational movements, we concluded that using human bodies as stimulus material elicits embodied spatial transformations, which facilitates performance exclusively for egocentric transformations. Regarding stimulus material, the other-advantage ascribed to increased self-awareness-consciousness distracting attention-demanding resources, disappeared in the egocentric condition. This result may be due to the stronger link between the bodily self and motor representations compared to that emerging in object-based transformations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of the stimuli used for the different conditions. Top stimuli show pictures of participants’ own body, whereas bottom stimuli depict gender-matched other’s body. Left: sample stimuli used in the same–different object-based transformation task, for disparities of 45° (top) and 90° (bottom). Right: stimuli used in the egocentric transformation task, where participants were asked to judge whether the depicted figure has their left or right arm outstretched.
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Figure 1: Examples of the stimuli used for the different conditions. Top stimuli show pictures of participants’ own body, whereas bottom stimuli depict gender-matched other’s body. Left: sample stimuli used in the same–different object-based transformation task, for disparities of 45° (top) and 90° (bottom). Right: stimuli used in the egocentric transformation task, where participants were asked to judge whether the depicted figure has their left or right arm outstretched.

Mentions: For the mental rotation task the experiment was run on a laptop with a 17″ monitor located approximately 60 cm in front of the participants using the software “Presentation” (Neurobehavioral Systems) for presenting the stimuli. Regarding the experimental stimuli, there were four conditions, two object-based and two egocentric ones which were in turn split into two further categories, specifically “self” and “other”: (1) object-based-other, (2) object-based-self, (3) egocentric-other, (4) egocentric-self, presented in four separate blocks, as illustrated in Figure 1.


Embodied mental rotation: a special link between egocentric transformation and the bodily self.

Kaltner S, Riecke BE, Jansen P - Front Psychol (2014)

Examples of the stimuli used for the different conditions. Top stimuli show pictures of participants’ own body, whereas bottom stimuli depict gender-matched other’s body. Left: sample stimuli used in the same–different object-based transformation task, for disparities of 45° (top) and 90° (bottom). Right: stimuli used in the egocentric transformation task, where participants were asked to judge whether the depicted figure has their left or right arm outstretched.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4042493&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of the stimuli used for the different conditions. Top stimuli show pictures of participants’ own body, whereas bottom stimuli depict gender-matched other’s body. Left: sample stimuli used in the same–different object-based transformation task, for disparities of 45° (top) and 90° (bottom). Right: stimuli used in the egocentric transformation task, where participants were asked to judge whether the depicted figure has their left or right arm outstretched.
Mentions: For the mental rotation task the experiment was run on a laptop with a 17″ monitor located approximately 60 cm in front of the participants using the software “Presentation” (Neurobehavioral Systems) for presenting the stimuli. Regarding the experimental stimuli, there were four conditions, two object-based and two egocentric ones which were in turn split into two further categories, specifically “self” and “other”: (1) object-based-other, (2) object-based-self, (3) egocentric-other, (4) egocentric-self, presented in four separate blocks, as illustrated in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: In line with this, we expected that images of the own body are solved faster than another person's body stimuli.Results showed a benefit of motor expertise and representations of another person's body, but only for the object-based transformation task.Regarding stimulus material, the other-advantage ascribed to increased self-awareness-consciousness distracting attention-demanding resources, disappeared in the egocentric condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Sport Science, University of Regensburg Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This experiment investigated the influence of motor expertise on object-based versus egocentric transformations in a chronometric mental rotation task using images of either the own or another person's body as stimulus material. According to the embodied cognition viewpoint, we hypothesized motor-experts to outperform non-motor experts specifically in the egocentric condition because of higher kinesthetic representation and motor simulations compared to object-based transformations. In line with this, we expected that images of the own body are solved faster than another person's body stimuli. Results showed a benefit of motor expertise and representations of another person's body, but only for the object-based transformation task. That is, this other-advantage diminishes in egocentric transformations. Since motor experts did not show any specific expertise in rotational movements, we concluded that using human bodies as stimulus material elicits embodied spatial transformations, which facilitates performance exclusively for egocentric transformations. Regarding stimulus material, the other-advantage ascribed to increased self-awareness-consciousness distracting attention-demanding resources, disappeared in the egocentric condition. This result may be due to the stronger link between the bodily self and motor representations compared to that emerging in object-based transformations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus