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A rat decellularized small bowel scaffold that preserves villus-crypt architecture for intestinal regeneration.

Totonelli G, Maghsoudlou P, Garriboli M, Riegler J, Orlando G, Burns AJ, Sebire NJ, Smith VV, Fishman JM, Ghionzoli M, Turmaine M, Birchall MA, Atala A, Soker S, Lythgoe MF, Seifalian A, Pierro A, Eaton S, De Coppi P - Biomaterials (2012)

Bottom Line: In this study, using a detergent-enzymatic treatment (DET), we optimize in rats a new protocol that creates a natural intestinal scaffold, as a base for developing functional intestinal tissue.After 1 cycle of DET, histological examination and SEM and TEM analyses showed removal of cellular elements with preservation of the native architecture and connective tissue components.Maintenance of biomechanical, adhesion and angiogenic properties were also demonstrated strengthen the idea that matrices obtained using DET may represent a valid support for intestinal regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Surgery Unit, Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital, University College London, London WC1N 1EH, UK.

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Pro-angiogenic properties of intestinal acellular matrix in vivo (A–C). Macroscopic quantification of converging vessels was blindly made for both intestinal decellularized samples and polyester membrane used as negative control (A). On day 6 after implantation, the number of vessels converging towards the intestinal matrices is significantly increased in comparison to the same samples at day 1 (P < 0.01) and to the polyester membrane that was used as a negative control (P < 0.05). Example of CAM at 1 day after implantation of intestinal acellular matrix: the sample of decellularized tissue is adherent to the CAM and starts to be surrounded by allantoic vessels (B). After 6 days of implantation, intestinal matrices are completely enveloped by the newly formed vessels, organized in a network (C).
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fig7: Pro-angiogenic properties of intestinal acellular matrix in vivo (A–C). Macroscopic quantification of converging vessels was blindly made for both intestinal decellularized samples and polyester membrane used as negative control (A). On day 6 after implantation, the number of vessels converging towards the intestinal matrices is significantly increased in comparison to the same samples at day 1 (P < 0.01) and to the polyester membrane that was used as a negative control (P < 0.05). Example of CAM at 1 day after implantation of intestinal acellular matrix: the sample of decellularized tissue is adherent to the CAM and starts to be surrounded by allantoic vessels (B). After 6 days of implantation, intestinal matrices are completely enveloped by the newly formed vessels, organized in a network (C).

Mentions: To test the ability of the intestinal acellular matrix to attract blood vessels we used an established in vivo system [11] where the matrix was placed on the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Samples of decellularized intestine and polyester membrane controls placed on the CAM were analyzed daily under a stereomicroscope. One day after placement on the CAM, intestinal matrices were adherent to the CAM and had started to be surrounded by allantoic vessels that grew towards the tissues. At day 6 after implantation, intestinal matrices were completely enveloped by the CAM and the vessels were organized in a network surrounding the tissue samples (Fig. 7B and C). To evaluate the pro-angiogenic effect of the intestinal acellular matrices on the CAM, vessel growth, (i.e. blood vessels converging towards the matrix) was quantified at day 1 and 6 in a blinded fashion. At day 1 after implantation no significant difference in the number of vessels growing towards the implanted tissues was observed. However, 6 days after implantation, the number of allantoic vessels converging towards the intestinal matrices was increased significantly compared to the same samples at day 1 (P < 0.01) and to the polyester membranes at the same time-point (P < 0.05; Fig. 7A).


A rat decellularized small bowel scaffold that preserves villus-crypt architecture for intestinal regeneration.

Totonelli G, Maghsoudlou P, Garriboli M, Riegler J, Orlando G, Burns AJ, Sebire NJ, Smith VV, Fishman JM, Ghionzoli M, Turmaine M, Birchall MA, Atala A, Soker S, Lythgoe MF, Seifalian A, Pierro A, Eaton S, De Coppi P - Biomaterials (2012)

Pro-angiogenic properties of intestinal acellular matrix in vivo (A–C). Macroscopic quantification of converging vessels was blindly made for both intestinal decellularized samples and polyester membrane used as negative control (A). On day 6 after implantation, the number of vessels converging towards the intestinal matrices is significantly increased in comparison to the same samples at day 1 (P < 0.01) and to the polyester membrane that was used as a negative control (P < 0.05). Example of CAM at 1 day after implantation of intestinal acellular matrix: the sample of decellularized tissue is adherent to the CAM and starts to be surrounded by allantoic vessels (B). After 6 days of implantation, intestinal matrices are completely enveloped by the newly formed vessels, organized in a network (C).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4022101&req=5

fig7: Pro-angiogenic properties of intestinal acellular matrix in vivo (A–C). Macroscopic quantification of converging vessels was blindly made for both intestinal decellularized samples and polyester membrane used as negative control (A). On day 6 after implantation, the number of vessels converging towards the intestinal matrices is significantly increased in comparison to the same samples at day 1 (P < 0.01) and to the polyester membrane that was used as a negative control (P < 0.05). Example of CAM at 1 day after implantation of intestinal acellular matrix: the sample of decellularized tissue is adherent to the CAM and starts to be surrounded by allantoic vessels (B). After 6 days of implantation, intestinal matrices are completely enveloped by the newly formed vessels, organized in a network (C).
Mentions: To test the ability of the intestinal acellular matrix to attract blood vessels we used an established in vivo system [11] where the matrix was placed on the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Samples of decellularized intestine and polyester membrane controls placed on the CAM were analyzed daily under a stereomicroscope. One day after placement on the CAM, intestinal matrices were adherent to the CAM and had started to be surrounded by allantoic vessels that grew towards the tissues. At day 6 after implantation, intestinal matrices were completely enveloped by the CAM and the vessels were organized in a network surrounding the tissue samples (Fig. 7B and C). To evaluate the pro-angiogenic effect of the intestinal acellular matrices on the CAM, vessel growth, (i.e. blood vessels converging towards the matrix) was quantified at day 1 and 6 in a blinded fashion. At day 1 after implantation no significant difference in the number of vessels growing towards the implanted tissues was observed. However, 6 days after implantation, the number of allantoic vessels converging towards the intestinal matrices was increased significantly compared to the same samples at day 1 (P < 0.01) and to the polyester membranes at the same time-point (P < 0.05; Fig. 7A).

Bottom Line: In this study, using a detergent-enzymatic treatment (DET), we optimize in rats a new protocol that creates a natural intestinal scaffold, as a base for developing functional intestinal tissue.After 1 cycle of DET, histological examination and SEM and TEM analyses showed removal of cellular elements with preservation of the native architecture and connective tissue components.Maintenance of biomechanical, adhesion and angiogenic properties were also demonstrated strengthen the idea that matrices obtained using DET may represent a valid support for intestinal regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Surgery Unit, Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital, University College London, London WC1N 1EH, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus