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Ultrasound exfoliation of inorganic analogues of graphene.

Stengl V, Henych J, Slušná M, Ecorchard P - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: The monolayer slices could potentially be prepared with a high yield (up to 100%) in a few minutes.Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were employed to verify the quality of the exfoliation.Herein, this new method of exfoliation with ultrasound assistance for application to mono- and bilayered materials in hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments is presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Chemistry Department, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR, v,v,i,, ŘeŽ 250 68, Czech Republic. stengl@iic.cas.cz.

ABSTRACT
High-intensity ultrasound exfoliation of a bulk-layered material is an attractive route for large-scale preparation of monolayers. The monolayer slices could potentially be prepared with a high yield (up to 100%) in a few minutes. Exfoliation of natural minerals (such as tungstenite and molybdenite) or bulk synthetic materials (including hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), hexagonal boron carbon nitride (h-BCN), and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4)) in liquids leads to the breakdown of the 3D graphitic structure into a 2D structure; the efficiency of this process is highly dependent upon the physical effects of the ultrasound. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were employed to verify the quality of the exfoliation. Herein, this new method of exfoliation with ultrasound assistance for application to mono- and bilayered materials in hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments is presented.

No MeSH data available.


XRD patterns of bulk synthetic samples of h-BN, h-BCN, and g-C3N4. The inset shows the patterns of the ultrasound-exfoliated samples.
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Figure 3: XRD patterns of bulk synthetic samples of h-BN, h-BCN, and g-C3N4. The inset shows the patterns of the ultrasound-exfoliated samples.

Mentions: The raw samples of molybdenite and tungstenite correspond to the card numbers 96-900-9145 and 96-901-2192 of the crystallography open database (COD), as seen in Figure 2. The inset presents the XRD spectra of the exfoliated MoS2 and WS2, recorded in a water suspension between two Mylar foils to avoid drying and restacking. Figure 3 shows the XRD patterns of the synthesized bulk h-BN, h-BCN, and g-C3N4 used for exfoliation. The bulk h-BN showed a diffraction line with 2Θ at 25.5° (002) and one line with a lower intensity at 42.7° (100), which are indexed on JC PDF card number 85-1068. The h-BCN sample corresponds to the JC PDF card number 52-0233, and the diffraction pattern consisted of three weak peaks at 26.4° (002), 42.3° (100), and 54.8° (004). The g-C3N4 possesses two diffraction lines, and it is widely accepted that g-C3N4 is based on tri-s-triazine building blocks [40]. The strongest peak at 27.65° is a characteristic interlayer stacking peak of aromatic systems, indexed for graphitic materials as the (002) peak. The small angle peak at 13.01°, corresponding to an interplanar distance of 0.676 nm, is indexed as (100), which is associated with interlayer stacking [35].


Ultrasound exfoliation of inorganic analogues of graphene.

Stengl V, Henych J, Slušná M, Ecorchard P - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

XRD patterns of bulk synthetic samples of h-BN, h-BCN, and g-C3N4. The inset shows the patterns of the ultrasound-exfoliated samples.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4022084&req=5

Figure 3: XRD patterns of bulk synthetic samples of h-BN, h-BCN, and g-C3N4. The inset shows the patterns of the ultrasound-exfoliated samples.
Mentions: The raw samples of molybdenite and tungstenite correspond to the card numbers 96-900-9145 and 96-901-2192 of the crystallography open database (COD), as seen in Figure 2. The inset presents the XRD spectra of the exfoliated MoS2 and WS2, recorded in a water suspension between two Mylar foils to avoid drying and restacking. Figure 3 shows the XRD patterns of the synthesized bulk h-BN, h-BCN, and g-C3N4 used for exfoliation. The bulk h-BN showed a diffraction line with 2Θ at 25.5° (002) and one line with a lower intensity at 42.7° (100), which are indexed on JC PDF card number 85-1068. The h-BCN sample corresponds to the JC PDF card number 52-0233, and the diffraction pattern consisted of three weak peaks at 26.4° (002), 42.3° (100), and 54.8° (004). The g-C3N4 possesses two diffraction lines, and it is widely accepted that g-C3N4 is based on tri-s-triazine building blocks [40]. The strongest peak at 27.65° is a characteristic interlayer stacking peak of aromatic systems, indexed for graphitic materials as the (002) peak. The small angle peak at 13.01°, corresponding to an interplanar distance of 0.676 nm, is indexed as (100), which is associated with interlayer stacking [35].

Bottom Line: The monolayer slices could potentially be prepared with a high yield (up to 100%) in a few minutes.Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were employed to verify the quality of the exfoliation.Herein, this new method of exfoliation with ultrasound assistance for application to mono- and bilayered materials in hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments is presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Chemistry Department, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR, v,v,i,, ŘeŽ 250 68, Czech Republic. stengl@iic.cas.cz.

ABSTRACT
High-intensity ultrasound exfoliation of a bulk-layered material is an attractive route for large-scale preparation of monolayers. The monolayer slices could potentially be prepared with a high yield (up to 100%) in a few minutes. Exfoliation of natural minerals (such as tungstenite and molybdenite) or bulk synthetic materials (including hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), hexagonal boron carbon nitride (h-BCN), and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4)) in liquids leads to the breakdown of the 3D graphitic structure into a 2D structure; the efficiency of this process is highly dependent upon the physical effects of the ultrasound. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were employed to verify the quality of the exfoliation. Herein, this new method of exfoliation with ultrasound assistance for application to mono- and bilayered materials in hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments is presented.

No MeSH data available.