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Morphogenesis and production of enzymes by Penicillium echinulatum in response to different carbon sources.

Schneider WD, dos Reis L, Camassola M, Dillon AJ - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work.Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae.These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Enzyme and Biomass Laboratory, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Caxias do Sul, 1130, Francisco Getúlio Vargas Street, 95070-560 Caxias do Sul, RS, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work. Among the six carbon sources studied, cellulose and sugar cane bagasse were the most suitable for the production of filter paper activity, endoglucanases, xylanases, and β-glucosidases. However, sucrose and glucose showed β -glucosidase activities similar to those obtained with the insoluble sources. The polyacrylamide gels proved the enzymatic activity, since different standards bands were detected in the media mentioned above. Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae. These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol.

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Optical microscopy images (upper panels) and scanning electron microscopy images (lower panels) of P. echinulatum S1M29 in 48 hours of submerged cultive, using cellulose (a), sugar cane bagasse (b), elephant grass (c), glucose (d), sucrose (e), and glycerol (f) as carbon sources.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig5: Optical microscopy images (upper panels) and scanning electron microscopy images (lower panels) of P. echinulatum S1M29 in 48 hours of submerged cultive, using cellulose (a), sugar cane bagasse (b), elephant grass (c), glucose (d), sucrose (e), and glycerol (f) as carbon sources.

Mentions: The medium formulated with cellulose (Figures 5(a) and 6(a)) presents a dispersed morphology, ranging from freely dispersed and aggregated (or mycelial clumps) as there are many regions with overlapping hyphae. Although it is difficult to identify the main hyphae, there is great branch thereof, which assume a morphology of hyphae elongated involving large part of the substrate surface, thereby increasing the interaction between the mold and the substrate. Ahamed and Vermette (2009) [35] found similar morphology in liquid media formulated with cellulose using T. reesei Rut-C30, whereas this morphology characterized by a highly branched hyphae elongated and has been associated with good productivity enzyme depending on the potential increase of the interaction between large amounts of branching hyphae and the substrate of the medium.


Morphogenesis and production of enzymes by Penicillium echinulatum in response to different carbon sources.

Schneider WD, dos Reis L, Camassola M, Dillon AJ - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Optical microscopy images (upper panels) and scanning electron microscopy images (lower panels) of P. echinulatum S1M29 in 48 hours of submerged cultive, using cellulose (a), sugar cane bagasse (b), elephant grass (c), glucose (d), sucrose (e), and glycerol (f) as carbon sources.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4022072&req=5

fig5: Optical microscopy images (upper panels) and scanning electron microscopy images (lower panels) of P. echinulatum S1M29 in 48 hours of submerged cultive, using cellulose (a), sugar cane bagasse (b), elephant grass (c), glucose (d), sucrose (e), and glycerol (f) as carbon sources.
Mentions: The medium formulated with cellulose (Figures 5(a) and 6(a)) presents a dispersed morphology, ranging from freely dispersed and aggregated (or mycelial clumps) as there are many regions with overlapping hyphae. Although it is difficult to identify the main hyphae, there is great branch thereof, which assume a morphology of hyphae elongated involving large part of the substrate surface, thereby increasing the interaction between the mold and the substrate. Ahamed and Vermette (2009) [35] found similar morphology in liquid media formulated with cellulose using T. reesei Rut-C30, whereas this morphology characterized by a highly branched hyphae elongated and has been associated with good productivity enzyme depending on the potential increase of the interaction between large amounts of branching hyphae and the substrate of the medium.

Bottom Line: The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work.Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae.These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Enzyme and Biomass Laboratory, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Caxias do Sul, 1130, Francisco Getúlio Vargas Street, 95070-560 Caxias do Sul, RS, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work. Among the six carbon sources studied, cellulose and sugar cane bagasse were the most suitable for the production of filter paper activity, endoglucanases, xylanases, and β-glucosidases. However, sucrose and glucose showed β -glucosidase activities similar to those obtained with the insoluble sources. The polyacrylamide gels proved the enzymatic activity, since different standards bands were detected in the media mentioned above. Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae. These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol.

Show MeSH