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Autoimmunity and asbestos exposure.

Pfau JC, Serve KM, Noonan CW - Autoimmune Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma.This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity.These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, 921 South 8th Avenue, Stop 8007, Pocatello, ID 83209, USA.

ABSTRACT
Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proposed relationships between asbestos exposure, autoimmunity, and fibrotic lung disease progression. Data (as mentioned in the text) support the connections indicated, but questions remain regarding (a) the types of fibers that are responsible and (b) the etiological and mechanistic bases for the outcomes.
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fig2: Proposed relationships between asbestos exposure, autoimmunity, and fibrotic lung disease progression. Data (as mentioned in the text) support the connections indicated, but questions remain regarding (a) the types of fibers that are responsible and (b) the etiological and mechanistic bases for the outcomes.

Mentions: Second, autoantibodies may not contribute significantly to pathology and may be the result of chronic damage and inflammation associated with asbestos-related pleural disease. The long, but uncertain and variable, latency of autoimmune changes further limits the epidemiological approaches that can be employed to elucidate these relationships (Figure 2). Longitudinal studies are required to disentangle this potential issue of reverse causality. To date only one study specifically addressed the temporal nature of the asbestos/autoimmune/lung pathology complex by following a cohort of workers in an asbestos plant [22, 38]. The baseline study demonstrated the presence of an increased frequency of ANA in this cohort, along with radiological changes in the workers' lungs [22]. The follow-up study demonstrated that subjects with ANA were more likely to develop radiologic abnormalities than subjects who were ANA negative [38]. These results, along with the knowledge that, in general, autoantibodies occur quite early in SLE patients, before clinical onset [62], argue against the hypothesis that autoantibodies associated with asbestos exposure occur after lung disease is already apparent clinically. A general population cohort that has been environmentally and occupationally exposed to amphibole asbestos is currently being followed to further examine the temporal relationship between autoantibodies and lung disease [63].


Autoimmunity and asbestos exposure.

Pfau JC, Serve KM, Noonan CW - Autoimmune Dis (2014)

Proposed relationships between asbestos exposure, autoimmunity, and fibrotic lung disease progression. Data (as mentioned in the text) support the connections indicated, but questions remain regarding (a) the types of fibers that are responsible and (b) the etiological and mechanistic bases for the outcomes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4022069&req=5

fig2: Proposed relationships between asbestos exposure, autoimmunity, and fibrotic lung disease progression. Data (as mentioned in the text) support the connections indicated, but questions remain regarding (a) the types of fibers that are responsible and (b) the etiological and mechanistic bases for the outcomes.
Mentions: Second, autoantibodies may not contribute significantly to pathology and may be the result of chronic damage and inflammation associated with asbestos-related pleural disease. The long, but uncertain and variable, latency of autoimmune changes further limits the epidemiological approaches that can be employed to elucidate these relationships (Figure 2). Longitudinal studies are required to disentangle this potential issue of reverse causality. To date only one study specifically addressed the temporal nature of the asbestos/autoimmune/lung pathology complex by following a cohort of workers in an asbestos plant [22, 38]. The baseline study demonstrated the presence of an increased frequency of ANA in this cohort, along with radiological changes in the workers' lungs [22]. The follow-up study demonstrated that subjects with ANA were more likely to develop radiologic abnormalities than subjects who were ANA negative [38]. These results, along with the knowledge that, in general, autoantibodies occur quite early in SLE patients, before clinical onset [62], argue against the hypothesis that autoantibodies associated with asbestos exposure occur after lung disease is already apparent clinically. A general population cohort that has been environmentally and occupationally exposed to amphibole asbestos is currently being followed to further examine the temporal relationship between autoantibodies and lung disease [63].

Bottom Line: Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma.This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity.These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, 921 South 8th Avenue, Stop 8007, Pocatello, ID 83209, USA.

ABSTRACT
Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus