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An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in high mountainous region of Chail valley (District Swat- Pakistan).

Ahmad M, Sultana S, Fazl-I-Hadi S, Ben Hadda T, Rashid S, Zafar M, Khan MA, Khan MP, Yaseen G - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Bottom Line: This paper represents the first ethnobotanical study in Chail valley of district Swat-Pakistan and provides significant information on medicinal plants use among the tribal people of the area.The present survey has documented from this valley considerable indigenous knowledge about the local medicinal plants for treating number of common diseases that is ready to be further investigated for biological, pharmacological and toxicological screening.This study also provides some socio-economic aspects which are associated to the local tribal communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Chemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed First University, Oujda 60000, Morocco. taibi.ben.hadda@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This paper represents the first ethnobotanical study in Chail valley of district Swat-Pakistan and provides significant information on medicinal plants use among the tribal people of the area. The aim of this study was to document the medicinal uses of local plants and to develop an ethnobotanical inventory of the species diversity.

Methods: In present study, semi-structured interviews with 142 inhabitants (age range between 31-75 years) were conducted. Ethnobotanical data was analyzed using relative frequency of citation (RFC) to determine the well-known and most useful species in the area.

Results: Current research work reports total of 50 plant species belonging to 48 genera of 35 families from Chail valley. Origanum vulgare, Geranium wallichianum and Skimmia laureola have the highest values of relative frequency of citation (RFC) and are widely known by the inhabitants of the valley. The majority of the documented plants were herbs (58%) followed by shrubs (28%), trees (12%) and then climbers (2%). The part of the plant most frequently used was the leaves (33%) followed by roots (17%), fruits (14%), whole plant (12%), rhizomes (9%), stems (6%), barks (5%) and seeds (4%). Decoction was the most common preparation method use in herbal recipes. The most frequently treated diseases in the valley were urinary disorders, skin infections, digestive disorders, asthma, jaundice, angina, chronic dysentery and diarrhea.

Conclusion: This study contributes an ethnobotanical inventory of medicinal plants with their frequency of citations together with the part used, disease treated and methods of application among the tribal communities of Chail valley. The present survey has documented from this valley considerable indigenous knowledge about the local medicinal plants for treating number of common diseases that is ready to be further investigated for biological, pharmacological and toxicological screening. This study also provides some socio-economic aspects which are associated to the local tribal communities.

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Life form representations of medicinal plants.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 3: Life form representations of medicinal plants.

Mentions: During the fieldwork of the present study, we collected data on 50 species belonging to 48 genera of 35 flowering plant families which have medicinal use (Table 1). The complete inventory of the ethnoflora consisting of taxon name in alphabetical order with voucher specimen number, family name, local name followed by life form, part used, preparation method, disease treated, phytochemical constituents, frequency citation (FC) and relative frequency of citation (RFC). The best represented used families in terms of the number of species were Lamiaceae (six species) and Polygonaceae (three species), while Amaranthaceae, Apiaceae, Ranunculaceaes, Rhamnaceae, Rosaceae, Rutaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Solanaceae were represented with two species each and other 25 families with one species each. The values and characteristics of Lamiaceae family as predominant in this area are similar to those of previous studied ethnoflora [27-30]. However, the predominance of Polygonaceae in our survey agreed with this statement that the more common a plant taxon in an area, the greater the probability of its popular use. The reported members of Polygonaceae in Chail valley includes Bistorta amplexicaule, Rheum australe and Rumex hastatus, those are commonly use as edible wild vegetables and to cure abdominal ailments, diarrhea and constipation by the local people. In terms of the life form, the highest number (29) of species used were herbaceous habit followed by shrubs (14), trees (6) and then climbers (1) (Figure 3). This is not surprising, that the herbaceous habit is dominant life form in our study but it is a common and widespread ecological phenomenon around the world [17,31]. The majority of documented plants in the valley are distributed generally in hilly tracts, near water bodies and in waste places as wild. However, a few common used species were found to be cultivated on small scale by the local farmers and household ladies for their use by themselves, for relatives and neighbors but not for marketing purpose. Mentha longifolia, Swertia chirayita, Plantago lanceolata, Origanum vulgare, Viola pilosa, Zanthoxylum armatum and Zizyphus jujuba were some common cultivated species in the valley. These species are used in the form of herbal teas, spices and powder drugs for the cure of ailments due to their rich and fragrant flavors. It is considered that understanding of the market potential for medicinal plants could provide rural farmers with the incentive for cultivation of high demand species in future.


An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in high mountainous region of Chail valley (District Swat- Pakistan).

Ahmad M, Sultana S, Fazl-I-Hadi S, Ben Hadda T, Rashid S, Zafar M, Khan MA, Khan MP, Yaseen G - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Life form representations of medicinal plants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4022037&req=5

Figure 3: Life form representations of medicinal plants.
Mentions: During the fieldwork of the present study, we collected data on 50 species belonging to 48 genera of 35 flowering plant families which have medicinal use (Table 1). The complete inventory of the ethnoflora consisting of taxon name in alphabetical order with voucher specimen number, family name, local name followed by life form, part used, preparation method, disease treated, phytochemical constituents, frequency citation (FC) and relative frequency of citation (RFC). The best represented used families in terms of the number of species were Lamiaceae (six species) and Polygonaceae (three species), while Amaranthaceae, Apiaceae, Ranunculaceaes, Rhamnaceae, Rosaceae, Rutaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Solanaceae were represented with two species each and other 25 families with one species each. The values and characteristics of Lamiaceae family as predominant in this area are similar to those of previous studied ethnoflora [27-30]. However, the predominance of Polygonaceae in our survey agreed with this statement that the more common a plant taxon in an area, the greater the probability of its popular use. The reported members of Polygonaceae in Chail valley includes Bistorta amplexicaule, Rheum australe and Rumex hastatus, those are commonly use as edible wild vegetables and to cure abdominal ailments, diarrhea and constipation by the local people. In terms of the life form, the highest number (29) of species used were herbaceous habit followed by shrubs (14), trees (6) and then climbers (1) (Figure 3). This is not surprising, that the herbaceous habit is dominant life form in our study but it is a common and widespread ecological phenomenon around the world [17,31]. The majority of documented plants in the valley are distributed generally in hilly tracts, near water bodies and in waste places as wild. However, a few common used species were found to be cultivated on small scale by the local farmers and household ladies for their use by themselves, for relatives and neighbors but not for marketing purpose. Mentha longifolia, Swertia chirayita, Plantago lanceolata, Origanum vulgare, Viola pilosa, Zanthoxylum armatum and Zizyphus jujuba were some common cultivated species in the valley. These species are used in the form of herbal teas, spices and powder drugs for the cure of ailments due to their rich and fragrant flavors. It is considered that understanding of the market potential for medicinal plants could provide rural farmers with the incentive for cultivation of high demand species in future.

Bottom Line: This paper represents the first ethnobotanical study in Chail valley of district Swat-Pakistan and provides significant information on medicinal plants use among the tribal people of the area.The present survey has documented from this valley considerable indigenous knowledge about the local medicinal plants for treating number of common diseases that is ready to be further investigated for biological, pharmacological and toxicological screening.This study also provides some socio-economic aspects which are associated to the local tribal communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Chemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed First University, Oujda 60000, Morocco. taibi.ben.hadda@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This paper represents the first ethnobotanical study in Chail valley of district Swat-Pakistan and provides significant information on medicinal plants use among the tribal people of the area. The aim of this study was to document the medicinal uses of local plants and to develop an ethnobotanical inventory of the species diversity.

Methods: In present study, semi-structured interviews with 142 inhabitants (age range between 31-75 years) were conducted. Ethnobotanical data was analyzed using relative frequency of citation (RFC) to determine the well-known and most useful species in the area.

Results: Current research work reports total of 50 plant species belonging to 48 genera of 35 families from Chail valley. Origanum vulgare, Geranium wallichianum and Skimmia laureola have the highest values of relative frequency of citation (RFC) and are widely known by the inhabitants of the valley. The majority of the documented plants were herbs (58%) followed by shrubs (28%), trees (12%) and then climbers (2%). The part of the plant most frequently used was the leaves (33%) followed by roots (17%), fruits (14%), whole plant (12%), rhizomes (9%), stems (6%), barks (5%) and seeds (4%). Decoction was the most common preparation method use in herbal recipes. The most frequently treated diseases in the valley were urinary disorders, skin infections, digestive disorders, asthma, jaundice, angina, chronic dysentery and diarrhea.

Conclusion: This study contributes an ethnobotanical inventory of medicinal plants with their frequency of citations together with the part used, disease treated and methods of application among the tribal communities of Chail valley. The present survey has documented from this valley considerable indigenous knowledge about the local medicinal plants for treating number of common diseases that is ready to be further investigated for biological, pharmacological and toxicological screening. This study also provides some socio-economic aspects which are associated to the local tribal communities.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus