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Wind speed during migration influences the survival, timing of breeding, and productivity of a neotropical migrant, Setophaga petechia.

Drake A, Rock CA, Quinlan SP, Martin M, Green DJ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: We demonstrate that wind conditions during spring migration are the best predictor of apparent annual adult survival, male arrival date, female clutch initiation date and, via these timing effects, annual productivity.We find little evidence that conditions during the wintering period influence breeding phenology and apparent annual survival.Our study emphasizes the importance of climatic conditions experienced by migrants during the migratory period and indicates that geography may play a role in which period most strongly impacts migrant populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Wildlife Ecology, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Over the course of the annual cycle, migratory bird populations can be impacted by environmental conditions in regions separated by thousands of kilometers. We examine how climatic conditions during discrete periods of the annual cycle influence the demography of a nearctic-neotropical migrant population of yellow warblers (Setophaga petechia), that breed in western Canada and overwinter in Mexico. We demonstrate that wind conditions during spring migration are the best predictor of apparent annual adult survival, male arrival date, female clutch initiation date and, via these timing effects, annual productivity. We find little evidence that conditions during the wintering period influence breeding phenology and apparent annual survival. Our study emphasizes the importance of climatic conditions experienced by migrants during the migratory period and indicates that geography may play a role in which period most strongly impacts migrant populations.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Male arrival date (squares) and female clutch initiation date (circles) for yellow warblers as a function of westerly wind speed during migration.Points represent mean dates ± SE for young (1 yr, open points) and older (≥2 yrs, filled points) birds in 2005–2006 and 2008–2012.
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pone-0097152-g003: Male arrival date (squares) and female clutch initiation date (circles) for yellow warblers as a function of westerly wind speed during migration.Points represent mean dates ± SE for young (1 yr, open points) and older (≥2 yrs, filled points) birds in 2005–2006 and 2008–2012.

Mentions: Annual variation in male arrival and female clutch initiation dates was also best described by models including migration wind speed (table 2). Wind speed models describing male arrival date received 66% of the total model support and wind speed models describing female clutch initiation date received 88% of total model support (table S2). The top model in both candidate model sets was (3b) which included westerly wind speed, age and a ‘wind speed×age’ interaction (table 2). The arrival of older males was delayed as westerly wind speed on migration increased, whereas the arrival of young males – who arrived later than older males – did not vary with wind speed (figure 3). Females of both age classes were delayed in initiating their first clutch in years with stronger westerly winds on migration but older females were less sensitive to variation in wind speed than younger females (figure 3).


Wind speed during migration influences the survival, timing of breeding, and productivity of a neotropical migrant, Setophaga petechia.

Drake A, Rock CA, Quinlan SP, Martin M, Green DJ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Male arrival date (squares) and female clutch initiation date (circles) for yellow warblers as a function of westerly wind speed during migration.Points represent mean dates ± SE for young (1 yr, open points) and older (≥2 yrs, filled points) birds in 2005–2006 and 2008–2012.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4020938&req=5

pone-0097152-g003: Male arrival date (squares) and female clutch initiation date (circles) for yellow warblers as a function of westerly wind speed during migration.Points represent mean dates ± SE for young (1 yr, open points) and older (≥2 yrs, filled points) birds in 2005–2006 and 2008–2012.
Mentions: Annual variation in male arrival and female clutch initiation dates was also best described by models including migration wind speed (table 2). Wind speed models describing male arrival date received 66% of the total model support and wind speed models describing female clutch initiation date received 88% of total model support (table S2). The top model in both candidate model sets was (3b) which included westerly wind speed, age and a ‘wind speed×age’ interaction (table 2). The arrival of older males was delayed as westerly wind speed on migration increased, whereas the arrival of young males – who arrived later than older males – did not vary with wind speed (figure 3). Females of both age classes were delayed in initiating their first clutch in years with stronger westerly winds on migration but older females were less sensitive to variation in wind speed than younger females (figure 3).

Bottom Line: We demonstrate that wind conditions during spring migration are the best predictor of apparent annual adult survival, male arrival date, female clutch initiation date and, via these timing effects, annual productivity.We find little evidence that conditions during the wintering period influence breeding phenology and apparent annual survival.Our study emphasizes the importance of climatic conditions experienced by migrants during the migratory period and indicates that geography may play a role in which period most strongly impacts migrant populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Wildlife Ecology, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Over the course of the annual cycle, migratory bird populations can be impacted by environmental conditions in regions separated by thousands of kilometers. We examine how climatic conditions during discrete periods of the annual cycle influence the demography of a nearctic-neotropical migrant population of yellow warblers (Setophaga petechia), that breed in western Canada and overwinter in Mexico. We demonstrate that wind conditions during spring migration are the best predictor of apparent annual adult survival, male arrival date, female clutch initiation date and, via these timing effects, annual productivity. We find little evidence that conditions during the wintering period influence breeding phenology and apparent annual survival. Our study emphasizes the importance of climatic conditions experienced by migrants during the migratory period and indicates that geography may play a role in which period most strongly impacts migrant populations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus