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A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest.

Nakashima Y, Kenzaka T, Okayama M, Kajii E - Int Med Case Rep J (2014)

Bottom Line: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging.On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity.Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Shimotsuke, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Electrocardiogram at the time of transfer to the hospital. There was pulseless electrical activity.
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f1-imcrj-7-089: Electrocardiogram at the time of transfer to the hospital. There was pulseless electrical activity.

Mentions: At the time of transfer to the hospital, the blood pressure of the subject could not be measured. An electrocardiogram (ECG) monitor indicated that his heart rate was 30 bpm (pulseless electrical activity) (Figure 1). In addition, his body temperature was 37.3°C and he had a Glasgow coma scale score of E1M1V1 (no eye opening, no verbal response, no motor response). Physical examination revealed swelling of the thyroid gland on the anterior side of the neck; however, there were no signs of jaundice or peripheral edema. In addition, there were no signs of exophthalmos, finger tremor, loss of hair, or nail lesions. Because of pulseless electrical activity, cardiac arrest was diagnosed using an ECG, and administration of medication (epinephrine and atropine) led to ventricular fibrillation (Figures 2 and 3). As a result, defibrillation was administered using a direct current (DC) type 360-J monophasic defibrillator (Nihon Kohden Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and the sinus rhythm was restored. Nonetheless, heart rate and breathing sounds were normal.


A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest.

Nakashima Y, Kenzaka T, Okayama M, Kajii E - Int Med Case Rep J (2014)

Electrocardiogram at the time of transfer to the hospital. There was pulseless electrical activity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4020898&req=5

f1-imcrj-7-089: Electrocardiogram at the time of transfer to the hospital. There was pulseless electrical activity.
Mentions: At the time of transfer to the hospital, the blood pressure of the subject could not be measured. An electrocardiogram (ECG) monitor indicated that his heart rate was 30 bpm (pulseless electrical activity) (Figure 1). In addition, his body temperature was 37.3°C and he had a Glasgow coma scale score of E1M1V1 (no eye opening, no verbal response, no motor response). Physical examination revealed swelling of the thyroid gland on the anterior side of the neck; however, there were no signs of jaundice or peripheral edema. In addition, there were no signs of exophthalmos, finger tremor, loss of hair, or nail lesions. Because of pulseless electrical activity, cardiac arrest was diagnosed using an ECG, and administration of medication (epinephrine and atropine) led to ventricular fibrillation (Figures 2 and 3). As a result, defibrillation was administered using a direct current (DC) type 360-J monophasic defibrillator (Nihon Kohden Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and the sinus rhythm was restored. Nonetheless, heart rate and breathing sounds were normal.

Bottom Line: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging.On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity.Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Shimotsuke, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus