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Back pain: the sole of presentation of sickle cell disease.

Osman S, Khan S, Hendaus MA - J Blood Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Diagnosing back pain in children and adolescents can be a challenge to health care providers.Although studies show that more than half of the cases of back pain in children are of non-organic cause, missing the right diagnosis could be detrimental.Hence, sickle cell disease with vaso-occlusive crisis should be incorporated into the list of differential diagnoses in children with back pain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.

ABSTRACT
Diagnosing back pain in children and adolescents can be a challenge to health care providers. Although studies show that more than half of the cases of back pain in children are of non-organic cause, missing the right diagnosis could be detrimental. We present a case of lower back pain in a ten-year-old male whom we eventually diagnosed with hemoglobin SE mutation, which responded well to pain management. Hence, sickle cell disease with vaso-occlusive crisis should be incorporated into the list of differential diagnoses in children with back pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Post contrast saggital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) picture of the whole spine showing multiple collapsed lumbar vertebral bodies (L3–L5) and non-enhancing areas involving vertebral bodies at dorsal and lumbar levels, suggesting infarcts.
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f1-jbm-5-049: Post contrast saggital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) picture of the whole spine showing multiple collapsed lumbar vertebral bodies (L3–L5) and non-enhancing areas involving vertebral bodies at dorsal and lumbar levels, suggesting infarcts.

Mentions: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine (Figure 1) and pelvis with contrast was requested on the second day post-admission. It showed multiple bone marrow-replacing lesions involving the thoracic, lumbar, and sacral vertebrae extending from T2 vertebral level downwards to the lower sacral segment. These displayed a predominantly low signal intensisty in T1-weighted images and high signal intensity in T12 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery-weighted images, with a patchy homogenous pattern of enhancement. There was an associated reduction of the height of the vertebral bodies, mainly in L3, L4, L5, and S1 levels.


Back pain: the sole of presentation of sickle cell disease.

Osman S, Khan S, Hendaus MA - J Blood Med (2014)

Post contrast saggital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) picture of the whole spine showing multiple collapsed lumbar vertebral bodies (L3–L5) and non-enhancing areas involving vertebral bodies at dorsal and lumbar levels, suggesting infarcts.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4020897&req=5

f1-jbm-5-049: Post contrast saggital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) picture of the whole spine showing multiple collapsed lumbar vertebral bodies (L3–L5) and non-enhancing areas involving vertebral bodies at dorsal and lumbar levels, suggesting infarcts.
Mentions: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine (Figure 1) and pelvis with contrast was requested on the second day post-admission. It showed multiple bone marrow-replacing lesions involving the thoracic, lumbar, and sacral vertebrae extending from T2 vertebral level downwards to the lower sacral segment. These displayed a predominantly low signal intensisty in T1-weighted images and high signal intensity in T12 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery-weighted images, with a patchy homogenous pattern of enhancement. There was an associated reduction of the height of the vertebral bodies, mainly in L3, L4, L5, and S1 levels.

Bottom Line: Diagnosing back pain in children and adolescents can be a challenge to health care providers.Although studies show that more than half of the cases of back pain in children are of non-organic cause, missing the right diagnosis could be detrimental.Hence, sickle cell disease with vaso-occlusive crisis should be incorporated into the list of differential diagnoses in children with back pain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.

ABSTRACT
Diagnosing back pain in children and adolescents can be a challenge to health care providers. Although studies show that more than half of the cases of back pain in children are of non-organic cause, missing the right diagnosis could be detrimental. We present a case of lower back pain in a ten-year-old male whom we eventually diagnosed with hemoglobin SE mutation, which responded well to pain management. Hence, sickle cell disease with vaso-occlusive crisis should be incorporated into the list of differential diagnoses in children with back pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus