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Mitochondrial metabolism and diabetes.

Kwak SH, Park KS, Lee KU, Lee HK - J Diabetes Investig (2010)

Bottom Line: In addition, mitochondrial function is an integral part of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.In addition, the pathophysiological role of mitochondrial dysfunction in insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction are discussed.We argue that mitochondrial dysfunction could be the central defect causing the abnormal glucose metabolism in the diabetic state.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Internal Medicine.

ABSTRACT
The oversupply of calories and sedentary lifestyle has resulted in a rapid increase of diabetes prevalence worldwide. During the past two decades, lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Mitochondria are vital to most of the eukaryotic cells as they provide energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate by oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, mitochondrial function is an integral part of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. In the present article, we will briefly review the major functions of mitochondria in regard to energy metabolism, and discuss the genetic and environmental factors causing mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. In addition, the pathophysiological role of mitochondrial dysfunction in insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction are discussed. We argue that mitochondrial dysfunction could be the central defect causing the abnormal glucose metabolism in the diabetic state. A deeper understanding of the role of mitochondria in diabetes will provide us with novel insights in the pathophysiology of diabetes. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.2010.00047.x, 2010).

No MeSH data available.


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Mentions: To summarize, we have reviewed the roles of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of diabetes (Figure 2). ATP production, ROS generation and apoptosis are the three main functions of mitochondria. We discussed genetic and environmental factors causing mitochondrial dysfunction and pathophysiological role of mitochondrial dysfunction in T2DM in regard to insulin resistance and β‐cell dysfunction. Although there is a growing body of evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction lies at the center of the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and T2DM, a causal relationship should be clarified by future studies. We hope that unraveling the roles of the mitochondria in diabetes will eventually lead us to discover new strategies to prevent and cure diabetes.


Mitochondrial metabolism and diabetes.

Kwak SH, Park KS, Lee KU, Lee HK - J Diabetes Investig (2010)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4020716&req=5

Mentions: To summarize, we have reviewed the roles of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of diabetes (Figure 2). ATP production, ROS generation and apoptosis are the three main functions of mitochondria. We discussed genetic and environmental factors causing mitochondrial dysfunction and pathophysiological role of mitochondrial dysfunction in T2DM in regard to insulin resistance and β‐cell dysfunction. Although there is a growing body of evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction lies at the center of the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and T2DM, a causal relationship should be clarified by future studies. We hope that unraveling the roles of the mitochondria in diabetes will eventually lead us to discover new strategies to prevent and cure diabetes.

Bottom Line: In addition, mitochondrial function is an integral part of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.In addition, the pathophysiological role of mitochondrial dysfunction in insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction are discussed.We argue that mitochondrial dysfunction could be the central defect causing the abnormal glucose metabolism in the diabetic state.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Internal Medicine.

ABSTRACT
The oversupply of calories and sedentary lifestyle has resulted in a rapid increase of diabetes prevalence worldwide. During the past two decades, lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Mitochondria are vital to most of the eukaryotic cells as they provide energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate by oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, mitochondrial function is an integral part of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. In the present article, we will briefly review the major functions of mitochondria in regard to energy metabolism, and discuss the genetic and environmental factors causing mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. In addition, the pathophysiological role of mitochondrial dysfunction in insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction are discussed. We argue that mitochondrial dysfunction could be the central defect causing the abnormal glucose metabolism in the diabetic state. A deeper understanding of the role of mitochondria in diabetes will provide us with novel insights in the pathophysiology of diabetes. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.2010.00047.x, 2010).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus