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One step forward: contrasting the effects of Toe clipping and PIT tagging on frog survival and recapture probability.

Guimarães M, Corrêa DT, Filho SS, Oliveira TA, Doherty PF, Sawaya RJ - Ecol Evol (2014)

Bottom Line: Potential negative effects of both techniques may include reduced locomotion and high stress levels.Accounting for the effect of the technique on the results should be considered, because most techniques may reduce survival.Based on our results, but also on logistical and cost issues associated with PIT tagging, we suggest the use of toe clipping with anurans like the blacksmith tree frog.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas CP 6109, Campinas, SP, cep 13083-970, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Amphibians have been declining worldwide and the comprehension of the threats that they face could be improved by using mark-recapture models to estimate vital rates of natural populations. Recently, the consequences of marking amphibians have been under discussion and the effects of toe clipping on survival are debatable, although it is still the most common technique for individually identifying amphibians. The passive integrated transponder (PIT tag) is an alternative technique, but comparisons among marking techniques in free-ranging populations are still lacking. We compared these two marking techniques using mark-recapture models to estimate apparent survival and recapture probability of a neotropical population of the blacksmith tree frog, Hypsiboas faber. We tested the effects of marking technique and number of toe pads removed while controlling for sex. Survival was similar among groups, although slightly decreased from individuals with one toe pad removed, to individuals with two and three toe pads removed, and finally to PIT-tagged individuals. No sex differences were detected. Recapture probability slightly increased with the number of toe pads removed and was the lowest for PIT-tagged individuals. Sex was an important predictor for recapture probability, with males being nearly five times more likely to be recaptured. Potential negative effects of both techniques may include reduced locomotion and high stress levels. We recommend the use of covariates in models to better understand the effects of marking techniques on frogs. Accounting for the effect of the technique on the results should be considered, because most techniques may reduce survival. Based on our results, but also on logistical and cost issues associated with PIT tagging, we suggest the use of toe clipping with anurans like the blacksmith tree frog.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An adult male Hypsiboas faber. Photo credit: D. T. Corrêa.
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fig03: An adult male Hypsiboas faber. Photo credit: D. T. Corrêa.

Mentions: We sampled an adult population of the blacksmith tree frog Hypsiboas faber (Anura, Hylidae, Appendix A), a large tree frog (snout-vent length = 92.3 ± 4.8 mm, N = 305; this population) distributed from northern Argentina to eastern Brazil (Martins 1993). As in most amphibian species behavior is sexually divergent, and males H. faber occupy a pond and build nests at the beginning of the breeding season, generally from October to March (pers. obs. D.T.C.), then begin to vocalize until a female approaches to inspect the nest (Martins and Haddad 1988).


One step forward: contrasting the effects of Toe clipping and PIT tagging on frog survival and recapture probability.

Guimarães M, Corrêa DT, Filho SS, Oliveira TA, Doherty PF, Sawaya RJ - Ecol Evol (2014)

An adult male Hypsiboas faber. Photo credit: D. T. Corrêa.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4020705&req=5

fig03: An adult male Hypsiboas faber. Photo credit: D. T. Corrêa.
Mentions: We sampled an adult population of the blacksmith tree frog Hypsiboas faber (Anura, Hylidae, Appendix A), a large tree frog (snout-vent length = 92.3 ± 4.8 mm, N = 305; this population) distributed from northern Argentina to eastern Brazil (Martins 1993). As in most amphibian species behavior is sexually divergent, and males H. faber occupy a pond and build nests at the beginning of the breeding season, generally from October to March (pers. obs. D.T.C.), then begin to vocalize until a female approaches to inspect the nest (Martins and Haddad 1988).

Bottom Line: Potential negative effects of both techniques may include reduced locomotion and high stress levels.Accounting for the effect of the technique on the results should be considered, because most techniques may reduce survival.Based on our results, but also on logistical and cost issues associated with PIT tagging, we suggest the use of toe clipping with anurans like the blacksmith tree frog.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas CP 6109, Campinas, SP, cep 13083-970, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Amphibians have been declining worldwide and the comprehension of the threats that they face could be improved by using mark-recapture models to estimate vital rates of natural populations. Recently, the consequences of marking amphibians have been under discussion and the effects of toe clipping on survival are debatable, although it is still the most common technique for individually identifying amphibians. The passive integrated transponder (PIT tag) is an alternative technique, but comparisons among marking techniques in free-ranging populations are still lacking. We compared these two marking techniques using mark-recapture models to estimate apparent survival and recapture probability of a neotropical population of the blacksmith tree frog, Hypsiboas faber. We tested the effects of marking technique and number of toe pads removed while controlling for sex. Survival was similar among groups, although slightly decreased from individuals with one toe pad removed, to individuals with two and three toe pads removed, and finally to PIT-tagged individuals. No sex differences were detected. Recapture probability slightly increased with the number of toe pads removed and was the lowest for PIT-tagged individuals. Sex was an important predictor for recapture probability, with males being nearly five times more likely to be recaptured. Potential negative effects of both techniques may include reduced locomotion and high stress levels. We recommend the use of covariates in models to better understand the effects of marking techniques on frogs. Accounting for the effect of the technique on the results should be considered, because most techniques may reduce survival. Based on our results, but also on logistical and cost issues associated with PIT tagging, we suggest the use of toe clipping with anurans like the blacksmith tree frog.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus