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Cryptococcal meningitis in a goat--a case report.

Stilwell G, Pissarra H - BMC Vet. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Treatment with antibiotics was unsuccessful and the animal was euthanized for humanitarian reasons.Encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans were identified from the lungs and meninges, showing that cryptococcal meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of goats showing paresis and hyperesthesia.The possibility of concurrent immunosuppression due to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection is raised.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, University of Lisbon, Alto da Ajuda, Lisbon 1300-477, Portugal. stilwell@fmv.ulisboa.pt.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cryptococcus spp. are saprophytic and opportunistic fungal pathogens that are known to cause severe disease in immunocompromised animals. In goats there are reports of clinical cryptococcal pneumonia and mastitis but not of meningitis.

Case presentation: The following report describes a case of a five year old buck showing severe neurological signs, including paraplegia and strong pain reaction to touch of the hindquarters region. Treatment with antibiotics was unsuccessful and the animal was euthanized for humanitarian reasons. Postmortem examination revealed lumbar meningitis, lung nodules and caseous lymphadenitis lesions. Encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans were identified from the lungs and meninges, showing that cryptococcal meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of goats showing paresis and hyperesthesia. The possibility of concurrent immunosuppression due to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection is raised.

Conclusions: Cryptoccocal meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis list of goat diseases with ataxia and hyperesthesia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Neurologic signs - buck showing signs of hind limb paralysis and self mutilation (skin excoriation on abdominal flank) due to hyperaesthesia.
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Figure 1: Neurologic signs - buck showing signs of hind limb paralysis and self mutilation (skin excoriation on abdominal flank) due to hyperaesthesia.

Mentions: The neurological signs were confined to the hindquarters and ataxia rapidly progressed to a complete flaccid paraplegia (Figure 1). Patellar, perineal and hind limb withdrawal reflexes were absent. Severe hyperalgesia and an intense pain reaction to touch were evident on both flanks and the hindquarters – for example, gentle stroking of the hind legs caused high-pitched bellowing. Constant scratching and self-mutilation occurred with the long horns resulting in a large alopecia on the right abdominal wall. There were no seizures, signs of blindness or other cranial nerve deficits. Head movements, reaction to touch and front legs’ muscle tone were reduced but considered normal due to the depression state of the animal, so the neurological examination suggested a lesion limited to the lumbosacral region.


Cryptococcal meningitis in a goat--a case report.

Stilwell G, Pissarra H - BMC Vet. Res. (2014)

Neurologic signs - buck showing signs of hind limb paralysis and self mutilation (skin excoriation on abdominal flank) due to hyperaesthesia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4020613&req=5

Figure 1: Neurologic signs - buck showing signs of hind limb paralysis and self mutilation (skin excoriation on abdominal flank) due to hyperaesthesia.
Mentions: The neurological signs were confined to the hindquarters and ataxia rapidly progressed to a complete flaccid paraplegia (Figure 1). Patellar, perineal and hind limb withdrawal reflexes were absent. Severe hyperalgesia and an intense pain reaction to touch were evident on both flanks and the hindquarters – for example, gentle stroking of the hind legs caused high-pitched bellowing. Constant scratching and self-mutilation occurred with the long horns resulting in a large alopecia on the right abdominal wall. There were no seizures, signs of blindness or other cranial nerve deficits. Head movements, reaction to touch and front legs’ muscle tone were reduced but considered normal due to the depression state of the animal, so the neurological examination suggested a lesion limited to the lumbosacral region.

Bottom Line: Treatment with antibiotics was unsuccessful and the animal was euthanized for humanitarian reasons.Encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans were identified from the lungs and meninges, showing that cryptococcal meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of goats showing paresis and hyperesthesia.The possibility of concurrent immunosuppression due to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection is raised.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, University of Lisbon, Alto da Ajuda, Lisbon 1300-477, Portugal. stilwell@fmv.ulisboa.pt.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cryptococcus spp. are saprophytic and opportunistic fungal pathogens that are known to cause severe disease in immunocompromised animals. In goats there are reports of clinical cryptococcal pneumonia and mastitis but not of meningitis.

Case presentation: The following report describes a case of a five year old buck showing severe neurological signs, including paraplegia and strong pain reaction to touch of the hindquarters region. Treatment with antibiotics was unsuccessful and the animal was euthanized for humanitarian reasons. Postmortem examination revealed lumbar meningitis, lung nodules and caseous lymphadenitis lesions. Encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans were identified from the lungs and meninges, showing that cryptococcal meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of goats showing paresis and hyperesthesia. The possibility of concurrent immunosuppression due to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection is raised.

Conclusions: Cryptoccocal meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis list of goat diseases with ataxia and hyperesthesia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus