Limits...
The traditional kampo medicine tokishakuyakusan increases ocular blood flow in healthy subjects.

Takayama S, Shiga Y, Kokubun T, Konno H, Himori N, Ryu M, Numata T, Kaneko S, Kuroda H, Tanaka J, Kanemura S, Ishii T, Yaegashi N, Nakazawa T - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Bottom Line: There was a significant increase in OBF 30 minutes after administration of TSS (100% to 103.6 ± 6.9%, P < 0.01).OBF increased significantly after TSS administration compared to control (P < 0.01) and also increased from 30 to 60 minutes after administration compared to baseline (P < 0.05).These results suggest that TSS can increase OBF without affecting BP or IOP in healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Comprehensive Education Center for Community Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-Machi, Aoba Ward, Sendai City 980-8575, Japan ; Department of Education and Support for Community Medicine, Tohoku University Hospital, 1-1 Seiryo-Machi, Aoba Ward, Sendai City 980-8574, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of oral administration of kampo medical formulas on ocular blood flow (OBF). A crossover protocol was used to randomly administer five grams of yokukansan, tokishakuyakusan (TSS), keishibukuryogan, or hachimijiogan to 13 healthy blinded subjects (mean age: 37.3 ± 12.3 years). The mean blur rate, a quantitative OBF index obtained with laser speckle flowgraphy, was measured at the optic nerve head before and 30 minutes after administration. Blood pressure (BP) and intraocular pressure (IOP) were also recorded. No significant changes were observed in mean BP or IOP after the administration of any of the kampo medical formulas. There was a significant increase in OBF 30 minutes after administration of TSS (100% to 103.6 ± 6.9%, P < 0.01). Next, TSS was administered to 19 healthy subjects (mean age: 32.0 ± 11.0 years) and OBF was measured before and 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after administration. Plain water was used as a control. OBF increased significantly after TSS administration compared to control (P < 0.01) and also increased from 30 to 60 minutes after administration compared to baseline (P < 0.05). These results suggest that TSS can increase OBF without affecting BP or IOP in healthy subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dynamic OBF changes in response to administration of TSS (●) and control (○). Data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The dagger indicates a statistically significant difference between TSS and control (two-way analysis of variance; ANOVA). The asterisk indicates a statistically significant difference from the baseline (repeated measurements of ANOVA, with post hoc Dunnett's test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4020465&req=5

fig1: Dynamic OBF changes in response to administration of TSS (●) and control (○). Data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The dagger indicates a statistically significant difference between TSS and control (two-way analysis of variance; ANOVA). The asterisk indicates a statistically significant difference from the baseline (repeated measurements of ANOVA, with post hoc Dunnett's test).

Mentions: OBF after the administration of TSS or water was significantly different (P < 0.01) (Table 4). OBF increased significantly 30, 45, and 60 minutes after administration of TSS (100% to 104.1 ± 5.3%; P < 0.05, 104.2 ± 4.8%; P < 0.05, 104.0 ± 5.5%; P < 0.05) (Figure 1). According to the results of the kampo diagnostic questionnaire, 5 subjects had “qi deficiency,” 3 subjects had “qi stagnation,” 6 subjects had “qi counter flow,” 4 subjects had “blood deficiency,” 10 subjects had “blood stasis,” and 8 subjects had “fluid retention.” OBF increased significantly 15 to 60 minutes after the administration of TSS in the group of subjects with “blood deficiency” and “blood stasis” (15 minutes, P < 0.05; 30 minutes, P < 0.05; 45 minutes, P < 0.05; 60 minutes, P < 0.05) and in the group with “blood deficiency” and “fluid retention” (15 minutes, P < 0.05; 30 minutes, P < 0.05; 45 minutes, P < 0.05; 60 minutes, P < 0.05) (Figures 2(a) and 2(b)). Figure 3 shows a representative image of OBF in the ONH before administration of TSS, as well as 30 and 60 minutes after administration.


The traditional kampo medicine tokishakuyakusan increases ocular blood flow in healthy subjects.

Takayama S, Shiga Y, Kokubun T, Konno H, Himori N, Ryu M, Numata T, Kaneko S, Kuroda H, Tanaka J, Kanemura S, Ishii T, Yaegashi N, Nakazawa T - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Dynamic OBF changes in response to administration of TSS (●) and control (○). Data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The dagger indicates a statistically significant difference between TSS and control (two-way analysis of variance; ANOVA). The asterisk indicates a statistically significant difference from the baseline (repeated measurements of ANOVA, with post hoc Dunnett's test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4020465&req=5

fig1: Dynamic OBF changes in response to administration of TSS (●) and control (○). Data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The dagger indicates a statistically significant difference between TSS and control (two-way analysis of variance; ANOVA). The asterisk indicates a statistically significant difference from the baseline (repeated measurements of ANOVA, with post hoc Dunnett's test).
Mentions: OBF after the administration of TSS or water was significantly different (P < 0.01) (Table 4). OBF increased significantly 30, 45, and 60 minutes after administration of TSS (100% to 104.1 ± 5.3%; P < 0.05, 104.2 ± 4.8%; P < 0.05, 104.0 ± 5.5%; P < 0.05) (Figure 1). According to the results of the kampo diagnostic questionnaire, 5 subjects had “qi deficiency,” 3 subjects had “qi stagnation,” 6 subjects had “qi counter flow,” 4 subjects had “blood deficiency,” 10 subjects had “blood stasis,” and 8 subjects had “fluid retention.” OBF increased significantly 15 to 60 minutes after the administration of TSS in the group of subjects with “blood deficiency” and “blood stasis” (15 minutes, P < 0.05; 30 minutes, P < 0.05; 45 minutes, P < 0.05; 60 minutes, P < 0.05) and in the group with “blood deficiency” and “fluid retention” (15 minutes, P < 0.05; 30 minutes, P < 0.05; 45 minutes, P < 0.05; 60 minutes, P < 0.05) (Figures 2(a) and 2(b)). Figure 3 shows a representative image of OBF in the ONH before administration of TSS, as well as 30 and 60 minutes after administration.

Bottom Line: There was a significant increase in OBF 30 minutes after administration of TSS (100% to 103.6 ± 6.9%, P < 0.01).OBF increased significantly after TSS administration compared to control (P < 0.01) and also increased from 30 to 60 minutes after administration compared to baseline (P < 0.05).These results suggest that TSS can increase OBF without affecting BP or IOP in healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Comprehensive Education Center for Community Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-Machi, Aoba Ward, Sendai City 980-8575, Japan ; Department of Education and Support for Community Medicine, Tohoku University Hospital, 1-1 Seiryo-Machi, Aoba Ward, Sendai City 980-8574, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of oral administration of kampo medical formulas on ocular blood flow (OBF). A crossover protocol was used to randomly administer five grams of yokukansan, tokishakuyakusan (TSS), keishibukuryogan, or hachimijiogan to 13 healthy blinded subjects (mean age: 37.3 ± 12.3 years). The mean blur rate, a quantitative OBF index obtained with laser speckle flowgraphy, was measured at the optic nerve head before and 30 minutes after administration. Blood pressure (BP) and intraocular pressure (IOP) were also recorded. No significant changes were observed in mean BP or IOP after the administration of any of the kampo medical formulas. There was a significant increase in OBF 30 minutes after administration of TSS (100% to 103.6 ± 6.9%, P < 0.01). Next, TSS was administered to 19 healthy subjects (mean age: 32.0 ± 11.0 years) and OBF was measured before and 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after administration. Plain water was used as a control. OBF increased significantly after TSS administration compared to control (P < 0.01) and also increased from 30 to 60 minutes after administration compared to baseline (P < 0.05). These results suggest that TSS can increase OBF without affecting BP or IOP in healthy subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus