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Suppression of Face Perception during Saccadic Eye Movements.

Seirafi M, De Weerd P, de Gelder B - J Ophthalmol (2014)

Bottom Line: Studying the reduced visibility of visual stimuli around the time of saccade-known as saccadic suppression-is a key step to investigate saccadic omission.The extension of the results from simple stimuli to more complex objects has been neglected.Here, we provide the first evidence of complete suppression of complex visual stimuli during the saccadic eye movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory, Tilburg University, 5037 AB Tilburg, The Netherlands ; Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, 6229 EV Maastricht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Lack of awareness of a stimulus briefly presented during saccadic eye movement is known as saccadic omission. Studying the reduced visibility of visual stimuli around the time of saccade-known as saccadic suppression-is a key step to investigate saccadic omission. To date, almost all studies have been focused on the reduced visibility of simple stimuli such as flashes and bars. The extension of the results from simple stimuli to more complex objects has been neglected. In two experimental tasks, we measured the subjective and objective awareness of a briefly presented face stimuli during saccadic eye movement. In the first task, we measured the subjective awareness of the visual stimuli and showed that in most of the trials there is no conscious awareness of the faces. In the second task, we measured objective sensitivity in a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) face detection task, which demonstrated chance-level performance. Here, we provide the first evidence of complete suppression of complex visual stimuli during the saccadic eye movement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sensitivity of individual participants in the face detection task.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig4: Sensitivity of individual participants in the face detection task.

Mentions: First, we calculated d′ as a measure of sensitivity for each participant (see Section 2). Four participants exhibited below-chance behavior (negative d′) in the face detection task (Figure 4). A negative d′ at subject level can generally be related to either mislabeling the response options by the subject or a case of sampling error similar to the most subliminal studies [16, 23]. The former is quite unlikely in our experimental setup due to presentation of response options on the screen after every single trial; hence, the latter is most likely the case in this experiment. In group analysis, resetting negative d′s to zero value or simply omitting them from the analysis might lead to an inflated estimate of group d′ [24, 25]; thus, we kept them for the main analysis. Nevertheless, a post hoc analysis excluding only the highest negative d′ (subject 1) exhibited no difference in the significance of the statistical results (below).


Suppression of Face Perception during Saccadic Eye Movements.

Seirafi M, De Weerd P, de Gelder B - J Ophthalmol (2014)

Sensitivity of individual participants in the face detection task.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4020295&req=5

fig4: Sensitivity of individual participants in the face detection task.
Mentions: First, we calculated d′ as a measure of sensitivity for each participant (see Section 2). Four participants exhibited below-chance behavior (negative d′) in the face detection task (Figure 4). A negative d′ at subject level can generally be related to either mislabeling the response options by the subject or a case of sampling error similar to the most subliminal studies [16, 23]. The former is quite unlikely in our experimental setup due to presentation of response options on the screen after every single trial; hence, the latter is most likely the case in this experiment. In group analysis, resetting negative d′s to zero value or simply omitting them from the analysis might lead to an inflated estimate of group d′ [24, 25]; thus, we kept them for the main analysis. Nevertheless, a post hoc analysis excluding only the highest negative d′ (subject 1) exhibited no difference in the significance of the statistical results (below).

Bottom Line: Studying the reduced visibility of visual stimuli around the time of saccade-known as saccadic suppression-is a key step to investigate saccadic omission.The extension of the results from simple stimuli to more complex objects has been neglected.Here, we provide the first evidence of complete suppression of complex visual stimuli during the saccadic eye movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory, Tilburg University, 5037 AB Tilburg, The Netherlands ; Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, 6229 EV Maastricht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Lack of awareness of a stimulus briefly presented during saccadic eye movement is known as saccadic omission. Studying the reduced visibility of visual stimuli around the time of saccade-known as saccadic suppression-is a key step to investigate saccadic omission. To date, almost all studies have been focused on the reduced visibility of simple stimuli such as flashes and bars. The extension of the results from simple stimuli to more complex objects has been neglected. In two experimental tasks, we measured the subjective and objective awareness of a briefly presented face stimuli during saccadic eye movement. In the first task, we measured the subjective awareness of the visual stimuli and showed that in most of the trials there is no conscious awareness of the faces. In the second task, we measured objective sensitivity in a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) face detection task, which demonstrated chance-level performance. Here, we provide the first evidence of complete suppression of complex visual stimuli during the saccadic eye movement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus