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A 63 years old woman with progressive mechanical dysphagia and weight loss: a case presentation.

Baghbanian M, Salmanroghani H, Baghbanian A, Samet M, Amirbeigy MK - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2013)

Bottom Line: Endoscopy and / or a barium swallow are helpful in identifying the anatomical disarrangement.There were no respiratory symptoms.Diagnosis was made by a computerized tomography scan of the thorax, bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Shaheed Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

ABSTRACT
When considering a patient with dysphagia, an attempt should be made to determine whether the patient has difficulty only with solid boluses (suggestive of mechanical dysphagia) or with liquids and solids (suggestive of a motility dysphagia). Lesions such as an oesophageal tumor and external pressure effect from a lung tumor or aberrant vessel can lead to mechanical dysphagia. Endoscopy and / or a barium swallow are helpful in identifying the anatomical disarrangement. In this study a patient with progressive mechanical dysphagia is presented that finally diagnosed by as Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma. There were no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis was made by a computerized tomography scan of the thorax, bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bronchoscopy showing 50% narrowing and mucosal irregularity in the left main bronchus (left image) and normal right main bronchus (right image)
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Figure 0003: Bronchoscopy showing 50% narrowing and mucosal irregularity in the left main bronchus (left image) and normal right main bronchus (right image)

Mentions: The patient had no respiratory symptoms but since mediastinal lesion seen on the CT scan was taking over the left bronchus and was in close contact to it, bronchoscopy was performed; there was fine mucosal irregularity with about 50% narrowing without apparent mass lesion in the left main bronchus. Biopsy from this trivial bronchoscopic finding revealed bronchial squamous cell carcinoma (Figure 3).


A 63 years old woman with progressive mechanical dysphagia and weight loss: a case presentation.

Baghbanian M, Salmanroghani H, Baghbanian A, Samet M, Amirbeigy MK - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2013)

Bronchoscopy showing 50% narrowing and mucosal irregularity in the left main bronchus (left image) and normal right main bronchus (right image)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4017507&req=5

Figure 0003: Bronchoscopy showing 50% narrowing and mucosal irregularity in the left main bronchus (left image) and normal right main bronchus (right image)
Mentions: The patient had no respiratory symptoms but since mediastinal lesion seen on the CT scan was taking over the left bronchus and was in close contact to it, bronchoscopy was performed; there was fine mucosal irregularity with about 50% narrowing without apparent mass lesion in the left main bronchus. Biopsy from this trivial bronchoscopic finding revealed bronchial squamous cell carcinoma (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Endoscopy and / or a barium swallow are helpful in identifying the anatomical disarrangement.There were no respiratory symptoms.Diagnosis was made by a computerized tomography scan of the thorax, bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Shaheed Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

ABSTRACT
When considering a patient with dysphagia, an attempt should be made to determine whether the patient has difficulty only with solid boluses (suggestive of mechanical dysphagia) or with liquids and solids (suggestive of a motility dysphagia). Lesions such as an oesophageal tumor and external pressure effect from a lung tumor or aberrant vessel can lead to mechanical dysphagia. Endoscopy and / or a barium swallow are helpful in identifying the anatomical disarrangement. In this study a patient with progressive mechanical dysphagia is presented that finally diagnosed by as Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma. There were no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis was made by a computerized tomography scan of the thorax, bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus