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Microscopic Enteritis; clinical features and correlations with symptoms.

Shahraki T, Rostami K, Shahraki M, Bold J, Danciu M, Al Dulaimi D, Villanacci V, Bassotti G - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2012)

Bottom Line: Histopathology did not reflect the severity of gluten sensitivity.This would suggest that the degree of intestinal mucosal damage might not be a reliable prognostic factor.Significant symptoms can be present with minor histological change on biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess the clinical characteristic of CD as well as correlation of symptoms and the degrees of intestinal mucosal lesions in Iranian children.

Background: Microscopic Enteritis (Marsh 0-II) is associated with malabsorption.

Patients and methods: From August 2005 to September 2009, 111 cases with malabsorption and classical gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated.

Results: The mean (±SD) age of children with CD was 4.9±3.5 years (range, 6 month - 16 years) and the mean duration of symptoms was 8 ± 20.5 months. 50 cases (45%) were female and 61 cases (55%) were male. The most common clinical presentation was failure to thrive in 72%, chronic diarrhea in 65.8% and Iron deficiency anemia in 59.5%. Sensitivity of EMA was 100% in patients with Marsh IIIb and Marsh IIIc. EMA was also positive in 77% of cases with Marsh 0, 18% in Marsh I, 44% in Marsh II and 81.8% in patients with Marsh IIIa.

Conclusion: Histopathology did not reflect the severity of gluten sensitivity. This would suggest that the degree of intestinal mucosal damage might not be a reliable prognostic factor. Significant symptoms can be present with minor histological change on biopsy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sensitivity of serology (%) in patients with different degrees of mucosal abnormalities
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Figure 0003: Sensitivity of serology (%) in patients with different degrees of mucosal abnormalities

Mentions: The lack of relationship between pathology and symptoms was impressively supported by our data. We show that the percentage of patients with diarrhea, constipation and failure to thrive was even higher in Marsh I patients compared to marsh III. Anemia and positivity for autoantibodies were the only parameters that significantly correlated with the macroscopic lesions (Marsh III) in this study. Although we are not quite sure why sensitivity of serology is co-relating so closely with the degrees of mucosal abnormalities (22, 28–31) (Fig. 3) small bowel inflammation is not reported only as severe (Marsh III) in anemic patients in other studies (27, 32).


Microscopic Enteritis; clinical features and correlations with symptoms.

Shahraki T, Rostami K, Shahraki M, Bold J, Danciu M, Al Dulaimi D, Villanacci V, Bassotti G - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2012)

Sensitivity of serology (%) in patients with different degrees of mucosal abnormalities
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4017477&req=5

Figure 0003: Sensitivity of serology (%) in patients with different degrees of mucosal abnormalities
Mentions: The lack of relationship between pathology and symptoms was impressively supported by our data. We show that the percentage of patients with diarrhea, constipation and failure to thrive was even higher in Marsh I patients compared to marsh III. Anemia and positivity for autoantibodies were the only parameters that significantly correlated with the macroscopic lesions (Marsh III) in this study. Although we are not quite sure why sensitivity of serology is co-relating so closely with the degrees of mucosal abnormalities (22, 28–31) (Fig. 3) small bowel inflammation is not reported only as severe (Marsh III) in anemic patients in other studies (27, 32).

Bottom Line: Histopathology did not reflect the severity of gluten sensitivity.This would suggest that the degree of intestinal mucosal damage might not be a reliable prognostic factor.Significant symptoms can be present with minor histological change on biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess the clinical characteristic of CD as well as correlation of symptoms and the degrees of intestinal mucosal lesions in Iranian children.

Background: Microscopic Enteritis (Marsh 0-II) is associated with malabsorption.

Patients and methods: From August 2005 to September 2009, 111 cases with malabsorption and classical gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated.

Results: The mean (±SD) age of children with CD was 4.9±3.5 years (range, 6 month - 16 years) and the mean duration of symptoms was 8 ± 20.5 months. 50 cases (45%) were female and 61 cases (55%) were male. The most common clinical presentation was failure to thrive in 72%, chronic diarrhea in 65.8% and Iron deficiency anemia in 59.5%. Sensitivity of EMA was 100% in patients with Marsh IIIb and Marsh IIIc. EMA was also positive in 77% of cases with Marsh 0, 18% in Marsh I, 44% in Marsh II and 81.8% in patients with Marsh IIIa.

Conclusion: Histopathology did not reflect the severity of gluten sensitivity. This would suggest that the degree of intestinal mucosal damage might not be a reliable prognostic factor. Significant symptoms can be present with minor histological change on biopsy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus