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Assessment of NAFLD cases and its correlation to BMI and metabolic syndrome in healthy blood donors in Kerman.

Lahsaee S, Ghazizade A, Yazdanpanah M, Enhesari A, Malekzadeh R - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2012)

Bottom Line: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is now recognized as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome, which includes hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, obesity, and systemic hypertension. 2002 randomly selected blood donors were recruited for this study.Subjects with a persistently elevated ALT level, evidence of steatosis on computerized tomography and a negative cirrhosis screen (viral hepatitis B and C serology, autoimmune hepatitis, transferrin saturation <45% and a no history of excess alcohol consumption or hepatotoxic medication) were presumed to have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 378 donors (20.5% of all subjects recruited) had elevated ALT levels at first measurement. 35 cases had persistently elevated serum ALT level.The mean body mass index of the 22 cases was 31.18 ±5.7 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was associated with the metabolic syndrome in these subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kerman University of Medical Science, Kerman Iran.

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of this study was to review cases of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease cases and to determine the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as a cause of elevated alanine aminotransferase in healthy blood donors in the Permian area and also assess risk factors of NAFLD such as BMI and correlation with metabolic syndrome in these subjects.

Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has been increasingly recognized as the most common pathological conditions affecting the liver. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is now recognized as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome, which includes hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, obesity, and systemic hypertension.

Patients and methods: 2002 randomly selected blood donors were recruited for this study. Subjects with elevated serum ALT level (greater than two times the upper limit of normal) were chosen for further follow up. Subjects with a persistently elevated ALT level, evidence of steatosis on computerized tomography and a negative cirrhosis screen (viral hepatitis B and C serology, autoimmune hepatitis, transferrin saturation <45% and a no history of excess alcohol consumption or hepatotoxic medication) were presumed to have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Results: 378 donors (20.5% of all subjects recruited) had elevated ALT levels at first measurement. 35 cases had persistently elevated serum ALT level. In 22 of these 35 cases (62.9%) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was the diagnosis. The mean body mass index of the 22 cases was 31.18 ±5.7 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was associated with the metabolic syndrome in these subjects.

Conclusion: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common diagnosis for subjects with elevated serum ALT level in healthy blood donors in Kerman, Iran.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

NAFLD on liver ultrasound and CT-Scan
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Figure 0001: NAFLD on liver ultrasound and CT-Scan

Mentions: Although the gold standard test for diagnosis of NAFLD is liver biopsy, since we could not use biopsy as a diagnostic test in voluntary blood donors; we used liver CT-Scan as the last step of our study for diagnosis of NAFLD in subjects whose laboratory tests were negative for other aetiologies of elevated ALT. By using CT-Scan and diagnostic test for NAFLD, sensitivity and specificity of sonography for diagnosis of NAFLD in our study was 72.7% and 100% respectively. Positive predictive value was 100% and negative predictive value was 68.4% (Figure 1).


Assessment of NAFLD cases and its correlation to BMI and metabolic syndrome in healthy blood donors in Kerman.

Lahsaee S, Ghazizade A, Yazdanpanah M, Enhesari A, Malekzadeh R - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2012)

NAFLD on liver ultrasound and CT-Scan
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4017463&req=5

Figure 0001: NAFLD on liver ultrasound and CT-Scan
Mentions: Although the gold standard test for diagnosis of NAFLD is liver biopsy, since we could not use biopsy as a diagnostic test in voluntary blood donors; we used liver CT-Scan as the last step of our study for diagnosis of NAFLD in subjects whose laboratory tests were negative for other aetiologies of elevated ALT. By using CT-Scan and diagnostic test for NAFLD, sensitivity and specificity of sonography for diagnosis of NAFLD in our study was 72.7% and 100% respectively. Positive predictive value was 100% and negative predictive value was 68.4% (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is now recognized as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome, which includes hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, obesity, and systemic hypertension. 2002 randomly selected blood donors were recruited for this study.Subjects with a persistently elevated ALT level, evidence of steatosis on computerized tomography and a negative cirrhosis screen (viral hepatitis B and C serology, autoimmune hepatitis, transferrin saturation <45% and a no history of excess alcohol consumption or hepatotoxic medication) were presumed to have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 378 donors (20.5% of all subjects recruited) had elevated ALT levels at first measurement. 35 cases had persistently elevated serum ALT level.The mean body mass index of the 22 cases was 31.18 ±5.7 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was associated with the metabolic syndrome in these subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kerman University of Medical Science, Kerman Iran.

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of this study was to review cases of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease cases and to determine the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as a cause of elevated alanine aminotransferase in healthy blood donors in the Permian area and also assess risk factors of NAFLD such as BMI and correlation with metabolic syndrome in these subjects.

Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has been increasingly recognized as the most common pathological conditions affecting the liver. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is now recognized as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome, which includes hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, obesity, and systemic hypertension.

Patients and methods: 2002 randomly selected blood donors were recruited for this study. Subjects with elevated serum ALT level (greater than two times the upper limit of normal) were chosen for further follow up. Subjects with a persistently elevated ALT level, evidence of steatosis on computerized tomography and a negative cirrhosis screen (viral hepatitis B and C serology, autoimmune hepatitis, transferrin saturation <45% and a no history of excess alcohol consumption or hepatotoxic medication) were presumed to have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Results: 378 donors (20.5% of all subjects recruited) had elevated ALT levels at first measurement. 35 cases had persistently elevated serum ALT level. In 22 of these 35 cases (62.9%) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was the diagnosis. The mean body mass index of the 22 cases was 31.18 ±5.7 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was associated with the metabolic syndrome in these subjects.

Conclusion: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common diagnosis for subjects with elevated serum ALT level in healthy blood donors in Kerman, Iran.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus