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Colorectal cancer and NF-κB signaling pathway.

Hassanzadeh P - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2011)

Bottom Line: However, many cases show that tolerance develops to such treatments; therefore, new strategies are required to replace or complement current therapies.Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors play a key role in many physiological processes such as innate and adaptive immune responses, cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation.Hence, anti-NF-κB therapy may rescue many cases of CRC and should be considered as a therapeutic target.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death. Progress has been made in the development of chemotherapy for advanced CRC. Targeted therapies against VEGF or EGFR are now commonly used. However, many cases show that tolerance develops to such treatments; therefore, new strategies are required to replace or complement current therapies. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors play a key role in many physiological processes such as innate and adaptive immune responses, cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. It has become clear that aberrant regulation of NF-κB and the signaling pathways that control its activity are involved in cancer development and progression, as well as in resistance to chemo- and radio- therapies. Hence, anti-NF-κB therapy may rescue many cases of CRC and should be considered as a therapeutic target.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

NF-κB signaling pathways
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Figure 0001: NF-κB signaling pathways

Mentions: In mammals, the NF-κB family is composed of five members, RelA (p65), RelB, cRel (Rel), NF-κB1 (p50 and its precursor p105) and NF-κB2 (p52 and its precursor p100) (Figure 1).


Colorectal cancer and NF-κB signaling pathway.

Hassanzadeh P - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2011)

NF-κB signaling pathways
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4017424&req=5

Figure 0001: NF-κB signaling pathways
Mentions: In mammals, the NF-κB family is composed of five members, RelA (p65), RelB, cRel (Rel), NF-κB1 (p50 and its precursor p105) and NF-κB2 (p52 and its precursor p100) (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: However, many cases show that tolerance develops to such treatments; therefore, new strategies are required to replace or complement current therapies.Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors play a key role in many physiological processes such as innate and adaptive immune responses, cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation.Hence, anti-NF-κB therapy may rescue many cases of CRC and should be considered as a therapeutic target.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death. Progress has been made in the development of chemotherapy for advanced CRC. Targeted therapies against VEGF or EGFR are now commonly used. However, many cases show that tolerance develops to such treatments; therefore, new strategies are required to replace or complement current therapies. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors play a key role in many physiological processes such as innate and adaptive immune responses, cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. It has become clear that aberrant regulation of NF-κB and the signaling pathways that control its activity are involved in cancer development and progression, as well as in resistance to chemo- and radio- therapies. Hence, anti-NF-κB therapy may rescue many cases of CRC and should be considered as a therapeutic target.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus