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Interactive 3D visualization of structural changes in the brain of a person with corticobasal syndrome.

Hänel C, Pieperhoff P, Hentschel B, Amunts K, Kuhlen T - Front Neuroinform (2014)

Bottom Line: Here, we present an application with two designs for the 3D visualization of the human brain to address these challenges.The application was developed to run in both, standard desktop environments and in immersive virtual reality environments with stereoscopic viewing for improving the depth perception.We conclude, that the presented application facilitates the perception of the extent of brain degeneration with respect to its localization and affected regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: JARA - High Performance Computing, IT Center - Computational Science and Engineering, Computer Science Department, Virtual Reality Group, RWTH Aachen University Aachen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The visualization of the progression of brain tissue loss in neurodegenerative diseases like corticobasal syndrome (CBS) can provide not only information about the localization and distribution of the volume loss, but also helps to understand the course and the causes of this neurodegenerative disorder. The visualization of such medical imaging data is often based on 2D sections, because they show both internal and external structures in one image. Spatial information, however, is lost. 3D visualization of imaging data is capable to solve this problem, but it faces the difficulty that more internally located structures may be occluded by structures near the surface. Here, we present an application with two designs for the 3D visualization of the human brain to address these challenges. In the first design, brain anatomy is displayed semi-transparently; it is supplemented by an anatomical section and cortical areas for spatial orientation, and the volumetric data of volume loss. The second design is guided by the principle of importance-driven volume rendering: A direct line-of-sight to the relevant structures in the deeper parts of the brain is provided by cutting out a frustum-like piece of brain tissue. The application was developed to run in both, standard desktop environments and in immersive virtual reality environments with stereoscopic viewing for improving the depth perception. We conclude, that the presented application facilitates the perception of the extent of brain degeneration with respect to its localization and affected regions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clipping artifacts depend on the definition of the distance value and are clearly visible when observing transitions in the sulci (dark gray) in the detail view. Left: Circular artifacts when using the closest voxel of the VOI. Middle: Diagonal artifacts when preferring voxels in straight alignment. Right: Smoothest result with homogeneous depth values for a nearby voxel.
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Figure 6: Clipping artifacts depend on the definition of the distance value and are clearly visible when observing transitions in the sulci (dark gray) in the detail view. Left: Circular artifacts when using the closest voxel of the VOI. Middle: Diagonal artifacts when preferring voxels in straight alignment. Right: Smoothest result with homogeneous depth values for a nearby voxel.

Mentions: The result of the first approach showed circular artifacts around small parts of the VOI that stuck out, and where depth changes of the VOI occurred (cf. Figure 6 left). For the second approach, we see hard edges in diagonal orientation (cf. Figure 6 middle). To create a smoother frustum top surface, neglecting small outliers, we implemented a third approach which is schematically shown in Figure 4 right. In addition to PV1 the texel PVd in TV was sought within a maximum distance ±d to PR in X- and Y- direction with the highest la value. was calculated as in the previous approaches, but was replaced with and the additional depth had to be included in the calculation of the frustum faces, resulting in(3)c=/RVd→/−/RVd→/·(/PRPV→/−r2)r1−r2.


Interactive 3D visualization of structural changes in the brain of a person with corticobasal syndrome.

Hänel C, Pieperhoff P, Hentschel B, Amunts K, Kuhlen T - Front Neuroinform (2014)

Clipping artifacts depend on the definition of the distance value and are clearly visible when observing transitions in the sulci (dark gray) in the detail view. Left: Circular artifacts when using the closest voxel of the VOI. Middle: Diagonal artifacts when preferring voxels in straight alignment. Right: Smoothest result with homogeneous depth values for a nearby voxel.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4017140&req=5

Figure 6: Clipping artifacts depend on the definition of the distance value and are clearly visible when observing transitions in the sulci (dark gray) in the detail view. Left: Circular artifacts when using the closest voxel of the VOI. Middle: Diagonal artifacts when preferring voxels in straight alignment. Right: Smoothest result with homogeneous depth values for a nearby voxel.
Mentions: The result of the first approach showed circular artifacts around small parts of the VOI that stuck out, and where depth changes of the VOI occurred (cf. Figure 6 left). For the second approach, we see hard edges in diagonal orientation (cf. Figure 6 middle). To create a smoother frustum top surface, neglecting small outliers, we implemented a third approach which is schematically shown in Figure 4 right. In addition to PV1 the texel PVd in TV was sought within a maximum distance ±d to PR in X- and Y- direction with the highest la value. was calculated as in the previous approaches, but was replaced with and the additional depth had to be included in the calculation of the frustum faces, resulting in(3)c=/RVd→/−/RVd→/·(/PRPV→/−r2)r1−r2.

Bottom Line: Here, we present an application with two designs for the 3D visualization of the human brain to address these challenges.The application was developed to run in both, standard desktop environments and in immersive virtual reality environments with stereoscopic viewing for improving the depth perception.We conclude, that the presented application facilitates the perception of the extent of brain degeneration with respect to its localization and affected regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: JARA - High Performance Computing, IT Center - Computational Science and Engineering, Computer Science Department, Virtual Reality Group, RWTH Aachen University Aachen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The visualization of the progression of brain tissue loss in neurodegenerative diseases like corticobasal syndrome (CBS) can provide not only information about the localization and distribution of the volume loss, but also helps to understand the course and the causes of this neurodegenerative disorder. The visualization of such medical imaging data is often based on 2D sections, because they show both internal and external structures in one image. Spatial information, however, is lost. 3D visualization of imaging data is capable to solve this problem, but it faces the difficulty that more internally located structures may be occluded by structures near the surface. Here, we present an application with two designs for the 3D visualization of the human brain to address these challenges. In the first design, brain anatomy is displayed semi-transparently; it is supplemented by an anatomical section and cortical areas for spatial orientation, and the volumetric data of volume loss. The second design is guided by the principle of importance-driven volume rendering: A direct line-of-sight to the relevant structures in the deeper parts of the brain is provided by cutting out a frustum-like piece of brain tissue. The application was developed to run in both, standard desktop environments and in immersive virtual reality environments with stereoscopic viewing for improving the depth perception. We conclude, that the presented application facilitates the perception of the extent of brain degeneration with respect to its localization and affected regions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus